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Is my chicken a rooster?

 
Sarah Doeden
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My barred rock is 4 months and just started crowing to get out of coop and sometimes just walking around. I’m thinking he may be a rooster?? Please help!?
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James Freyr
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I'm going to hazard a guess and say that I think you do, based on the pictures provided. The barred rock appears to be a little larger than the other ladies, which rooster are most often larger in stature than hens; he appears to have some tall arching tail feathers developing, which is also indicative of roosters with their tail plumage; and you mentioned the crowing. Another indicator which I am unable to see in the pictures provided is roosters tend to have much longer, more narrow feathers around their neck compared to hens. If you see the barred rock trying to do a funny little "sideways quick-step shuffle type dance" with his feet and try to jump on the back of one of the ladies, that's another positive check-mark for a rooster. Hope this helps!
 
Sarah Doeden
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Thanks James, shortly after I posted this I took this video so I’m definitely sure he’s a rooster now. If he’s crowing during the day and not early morning, does that mean he’ll normally crow mid morning/afternoon?
 
Andy Parker
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Does it say cock-a-doodle-doo or any-cock'll-do???
 
Terri Matthews
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Location: Eastern Kansas
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That look like a hen to me, though it Is easier to tell when they are older. Rosters get pointy feathers around their necks and on the back just in front of the tail. I usually look at the neck feathers for the first signs of roosterhood.

Speaking of tails, I did see the arching tail feather and that is more often seen in a half grown male than a female. I have seen that in hens but it is more common in the male. If that feather gets any longer I would say it is a male.

Pictures of barred rocks, both male and female:
http://www.swagbucks.com/?f=52&t=w&p=1&q=barred+plymouth+rock+pics
 
Tina Hillel
pollinator
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Our roosters tend to crow at any time. This morning at 3 am for instance. There was a skunk in the area so I can't blame them.  One is crowing as I type to alert us that a car is coming down the gravel road.  There are times I wish it only happened once a day, but they usually have their reasons for crowing and it can come in pretty handy.
 
Terri Matthews
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I am going to change what I just said. I notice a change in the barred pattern on the neck and hackle feathers: i bet those feathers are starting to grow longer and get pointy. I now think it is a roo.
 
n murray
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I agree with many others that you likely have a rooster on your hands.

I borrowed your image and highlighted what helped me make the decision -- the saddle feathers and the large comb. It's hard to see the saddle feathers on a barred rock, but I'm pretty certain there are saddle feathers starting to show up on the back of your rooster. The comb and wattles are also pretty large for his age/size (though barred rocks do seem to have big combs on hens). I've been able to use saddle feathers to identify roosters when they are relatively small, as the feathers themselves tend to be a very different size and shape (very long and thin). In a group of chicks we hatched out under a hen, we could tell the roosters at 6 weeks because they would spar with one another and pop their hackles up in doing so -- if one of them tried to spar with one of the hen chicks, she just sat down or wandered away. I've never seen hatchery chicks do this.

I think that the first baby crows of roosters are the funniest things. Our roosters crow literally all day long, but tend to keep quiet once the sun has set (thankfully!).
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Sarah Doeden
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Thanks everyone,

Here’s the video I took this Morning, shortly after posting. Needless to say Rooster for sure..  


Couldn’t figure how to upload video so added to YouTube

Any information on what to do next? We got chickens for the eggs, so now with a rooster would they all turn to chicks if we don’t separate him 100% of the time? Would keep him if it’s manageable to still get eggs.
 
Tina Hillel
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You will still get the same number of eggs the chickens would lay with or without the rooster.  The only way they will turn into chicks is if you are lucky enough that one of your chickens decides she wants to be a mom and goes broody.  She would have to sit on the eggs for about 21 days before you get any chicks. Lots of great info is on Permies! If you don't want any chicks, just keep taking the eggs and you don't have to worry about separating him.
 
Andy Parker
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I would say its a rooster tho you can get macho hens and girly roosters, I had a hen that took the role as left without a rooster they need a boss if you see what I mean. Also as previously said the comb and wattles are way too big for a young hen.
 
Chris Kott
pollinator
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I think that's a question only your chicken could answer. After all, is your chicken even binary?
 
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