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Ways to use Purslane?

 
pollinator
Posts: 1459
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Looking for different ways to use purslane.

I have added the bruised leaves to my tea and also like it minced and added to omlets.
I tried it in salads but it seemed a little too sour for me.

Also, I really want my husband to start eating it - he'll go along with just about anything if I can hide the taste - he doesn't like it.  But I don't want to ruin the benefits by cooking it to death either.
 
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I've tasted it before but have never tried this idea. Balance the sour taste with some fats and sweetener, aka oil and honey in an herb dressing

Toss some fresh herbs, good oil, garlic, mustard, purslane, an egg, maybe vinegar if needed, into a blender and give it a spin. just play around with ratios until you get what you like.
 
Posts: 488
Location: Foothills north of L.A., zone 9ish mediterranean
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I recently transplanted some wild purslane to my garden, and it is doing well.  I've nibbled on the leaves a little, and I like them just by themselves.  In a few weeks I'll be ready to try some recipes.  Anticipating.

This purslane pesto looks tasty:

http://www.grouprecipes.com/62049/greek-style-purslane-pesto.html

Turkish yogurt purslane salad sounds tasty, too.  


 
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
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purslane taco's, cook the meat with seasonings, mix with the raw purslane, fill taco's, load some fresh garden salsa, slap on some sour cream and enjoy.
 
Posts: 631
Location: NW MO
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South Carolina wrote:
Looking for different ways to use purslane.

I have added the bruised leaves to my tea and also like it minced and added to omlets.
I tried it in salads but it seemed a little too sour for me.

Also, I really want my husband to start eating it - he'll go along with just about anything if I can hide the taste - he doesn't like it.  But I don't want to ruin the benefits by cooking it to death either.



It seems that the malic acid /sour taste is 10 times greater if harvested in the morning:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portulaca_oleracea

 
Posts: 247
Location: Sierra Nevada mountain valley CA, & Nevada high desert
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Greetings, What you call purslane, we know as perper. We grew it on the ranch in southern California. It starts late here in the mountains at 6800ft, so we have it in the greenhouse.
I love it cooked with eggs, flavored with lemon.

Just found this forum, have a great day.

Richard
 
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Food that is too sour can be balanced out with salt and vice versa. I learned this from the food network, a la Jamie Oliver.
 
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I sauteed it with onions and garlic and it was pretty good. It grows in the cracks of my patio.
 
pollinator
Posts: 11799
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I made muffins with purslane seeds when I was a child.  I think I got the recipe from one of Euell Gibbons' books
 
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