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Hep! Hen lethargic, not moving!  RSS feed

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HELP! One of my hens isn't moving! Shes not drinking or eating either. She can stand on her legs for a few seconds, if I pick her up and get her to stand. She appears to be unable to move, sinking slowly back onto her side. She appears to be tired, always closing her eyes. Please, any help would be appreciated. Also, is something like this contagious? I have 11 other hens, and don't want something happening to them
 
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Move her into her own area, preferably in a climate controlled space, quiet, and keep an eye on her.  Sometimes chickens just get sick and die.  Sometimes they get sick and recover if they can avoid stress.

 
steward
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AGREED!  Whenever you have a sick bird, quarantine her until you can determine that it is not something that could spread.  As much as any of us hate to lose a bird, losing an entire flock is inexcusable.  Chix are very easily stressed, so put her in a safe, comfortable, and quiet location.  Whether she is eating or not, provide ample cool water, and a variety of food stuffs.  Only time will tell.
 
Tyler Ludens
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I had a chicken who suffered multiple seizures, almost seemed to be in a coma at one point, no visible cause.  She recovered and lived many years and was our single best laying hen (an Araucana).

 
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Location: Virginia
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cull her.  and burn the carcass.  keeping sick animals around is a gamble with hellacious odds against you.
 
                                    
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The hen died . Thanks anyways guys.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Sometimes they just die. 
 
T. Pierce
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yup.  made the choice easier on ya.  now keep an eye on all the rest of um.
 
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Location: Western Pennsylvania
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Did she have mites?  I have lost a few to mites.  It seems that they aren't well to begin with, but nothing really noticeable and they stop dust bathing, then the mites come and finish them off.  Both times it happened it was too late by the time they showed symptoms.  None of the other hens had mites, so I am thinking they go after the sick hen who isn't keeping up on her natural defense, dirt.

Tami
 
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xxwhyyxxx Hatfield wrote:HELP! One of my hens isn't moving! Shes not drinking or eating either. She can stand on her legs for a few seconds, if I pick her up and get her to stand. She appears to be unable to move, sinking slowly back onto her side. She appears to be tired, always closing her eyes. Please, any help would be appreciated. Also, is something like this contagious? I have 11 other hens, and don't want something happening to them



I have had the very same symptoms but also a bit of fluid coming from the mouth if any one knows a cure or what this is please tell me this is my favorite chicken out of 18

 
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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forest garden trees urban
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I had a chook die this way. After a lot of reading, I currently suspect it was botulism.
Apparently it can come from fly maggots.
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William Bronson wrote: I had a chook die this way. After a lot of reading, I currently suspect it was botulism.
Apparently it can come from fly maggots.



Thank you for telling me what this was. my chicken had died last week thought. but for for further notice of other chickens that may get this again I'll know what it is thank you very much
I have all the info here (:

I forgot my password for my old account josh Cavell I made a new one (:


A: Botulism Also called
Food poisoning

Prevalence-
Infrequent

Signs
General signs -
Fatigue, weakness, ruffled feathers, diarrhea, sudden death
Cardinal or diagnostic signs -
Neurological symptoms, including flaccid (floppy, not stiff) paralysis of limbs and neck, eyes partially closed, shaking or trembling, stumbling, torticollis. Your vet may be able to determine what was eaten from an analysis of crop or stomach contents.

Cause/s -
Eating rotten or spoiled food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum bacteria, or eating bugs or grubs (particularly maggots) that have been feeding on contaminated material, or drinking from water/eating feed soiled with botulism-containing matter, such as dirty litter. It is not actually the bacteria that causes an infection; instead, it is the toxin produced by the bacteria, which causes poisoning. The type that affects poultry needs warm temperatures to reproduce, so most cases occur in summer and fall.

Communicability -
Not passed from bird to bird, but if your flock is eating/drinking from the same source/s, several or all might come down with botulism at once.

Communicability to humans -
No. Humans can suffer from botulism from consuming spoiled food, but it is not passed to them by pet chickens. In addition, chickens are generally affected by a different type of botulinum bacteria than humans are, although there is rarely some overlap. That said, be sure to practice good biosecurity and wash hands after contact with your chickens (the same way you would with any pet), to prevent inadvertently putting soiled hands in your mouth.

Incubation period -
Depends on the amount of toxin eaten

Latent
No.

Endemic
Various botulism causing bacteria are found nearly everywhere, however they multiply chiefly in wet, rotting organic matter. This includes compost piles, where chickens often like to scratch.

Home treatment and/or prevention -
Prevention: Practice good biosecurity. Keep coop clean and dry. If litter gets wet, remove it before bacteria can proliferate. Iodine is a good sanitizer for this bacteria. Control flies by keeping coop and run clean. vaccines may be available in some areas, but are not generally practical unless you know there is a source nearby (in a neighboring yard or area) that you have no control to clean up.

Treatment: Home treatment is complicated, but can be managed by flushing your pet’s crop several times a day with an epsom salts or molasses solution. Home flushing can be dangerous, because it is easy for an inexperienced person to accidentally cause the solution to be aspirated, and drown the bird

Veterinary care - Your vet may be able to provide an antitoxin injection, or to provide detailed instructions and even a demonstration of flushing. .

Recovery - How a bird will respond to treatment will depend on the amount of “poison” ingested, and on how quickly the problem was identified and treatment began. If small amounts were ingested, the bird may recover spontaneously. If large amounts were consumed, the bird may die too quickly for treatment
 
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