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sharpening a knife

 
steward
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Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
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this video covers a lot of amazing stuff.  From creating a knife to sharpening to detecting a sharp knife.

(old video died - repaced w new video)

 
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I love this video. So awesome. I love to sharpen knives. I use Japanese water stones myself. And totally agree with the guy in video about Japanese knives. Probably some of the best knives in the world. I have a 10" Sugimoto chefs knife from Japan, it is so gorgeous. The interesting thing is, Sugimoto also made, or maybe still does make samurai swords.
 
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Location: rainier OR
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japan does not have a monopoly on good steel, personally I find may Japanese blades overly hard  (just a little to brittle) for kitchen use and prefer those made in Austria, and by a couple of Finnish companies they leave the edge easy to sharpen and repair with reasonable durability
 
Steven Baxter
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Brice Moss wrote:
japan does not have a monopoly on good steel, personally I find may Japanese blades overly hard  (just a little to brittle) for kitchen use and prefer those made in Austria, and by a couple of Finnish companies they leave the edge easy to sharpen and repair with reasonable durability



I'll have to check out some knives from Austria and Finland. I used a Swiss knife for many years and it always performed well. Even the German knives I used were good quality also.

What are some of the brands of those Austrian and Finnish knives?
 
pollinator
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Location: Vancouver Island
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I had some knives I liked (Kiwis) but after regrinding to take out holes in the blades, I figured out my wife needed a couple of cleavers ... Yeah, a small axe, cuts through chicken bones (and others) just fine. The big problem at our house is matching the tool to the job. I grew up with the idea a tool is something to be passed down... everyone else seems to be from the replacement school.
 
                                
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Len, I hear ya! My "good knives" don't get used as much 'cause I have to use them and hide them or find them in a drawer with all manner of knife-dulling implements.
 
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