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Help identifying a bracket fungus

 
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Sooo last year I ordered pearl oyster mushroom spawn from Fungi Perfecti.  I got healthy looking plugs, and innoculated 3 logs.  This spring, I thought they looked ready and soaked them.  This is what came out of the logs (including the plugs):

Can anyone ID this?  I have e-mailed the company, but thought I'd share it here too.
IMG_2361.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_2361.JPG]
younger specimin
IMG_2362.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_2362.JPG]
older specimin
 
gardener
Posts: 6414
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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looks a lot like turkey tail, but Paul and company will tell you for certain.

When you are going to inoculate logs you want to make sure they are fresh cut live trees, this reduces the possibility of contamination by already there spores.
I have so many different fungi on my land now that I cut a tree and haul it to where I'm going to do the inoculating then I cut the bottom foot off after I've placed my plugs and waxed them, the fresh end cut then gets waxed and once that is hardened I support the log length and make the separation cut and wax it.

Last year I lost several logs that I had precut and let dry for a couple of weeks (per recommendations) and turkey tail was what I ended up with from airborne contamination.
That was when I devised the method I use now and it is working far better for me, as in, I get the mushrooms I wanted instead of something else.
 
pollinator
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Location: Mason Cty, WA
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:
I cut a tree and haul it to where I'm going to do the inoculating then I cut the bottom foot off after I've placed my plugs and waxed them, the fresh end cut then gets waxed and once that is hardened I support the log length and make the separation cut and wax it.



I too let the logs sit for a couple of weeks first, but I'm sure we're wetter here than where you are. But turkey tail contamination is very likely here, so I want to be sure I get your method.

By bottom foot, do you mean you're standing your logs up? In an A-frame shape, while processing? I guess that makes it easier to wax the fresh end. Then why do you lay them on supports? By "separation cut" it sounds like you're taking each log you cut and cutting it in two just before putting it to rest & colonize, horizontally, probably on supports off the ground. Do I have that right? So are you waxing both ends?

I've read a lot of instructions and there is soooo much variation, it's hard to know what's best especially given regional differences.

 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Since I am just one old guy without a 4 wheeler I have to drag my fresh cut trees, the end that drags on the ground is that "bottom foot" that I cut off. (it is most likely to be contaminated by my soil fungi)

After I wrote that entry I built two "saw bucks" so now I can drag the trunk to them, get it up off the ground, supported by the saw bucks.
Having the trunk fairly level is very good for my back, and I can slice off that soil embedded bottom foot then get to drilling for plugs.
I also have a 16 foot long 2x4 that I put into the saw bucks first, that way I can cut mushroom logs to length and rope them to that 2x4 while I drill and cut the rest of the trunk. (I'm getting lazy or efficient, either description works)

Yes I am waxing both ends of each cut mushroom log and every hole that I drill and plug.

I have a concrete block mushroom log pad, and I lay my logs on this and work my up with criss crossed layers of logs. Once I have everything stacked I get a water hose and soak them down, then a piece of plastic is suspended by ropes and rocks so the stack is covered but the plastic doesn't touch the logs.
Over the first 3 to 5 weeks I water the logs at least 2 times a week.

for fruiting time I built a stand up rack (looks like a military rifle rack) so all I have to do is stand one end of a long on the bottom board and lean it against the upper 2x4 cross piece.
Then I can soak them and wait for tasty mushrooms to grow. Once I harvest I return those logs to the "stack".
 
pollinator
Posts: 418
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
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I am only now getting mushrooms from the logs I inoculated in Spring 2017.  I often find I have parchment mushrooms invading my logs and other times cheese polypore and of course turkey tail.  But I am now finding my cool and cold weather varieties of Shiitake and Oyster are showing up as well as Reishi.  

I am also finding that a warming spell after a freeze often results in more mushrooms.  

Growing mushrooms teaches me patience.
 
pollinator
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I think the second one might be a Ganodetma sp.
 
Dennis Bangham
pollinator
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Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
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Ken you may be right.  I was thinking G. Curtisii or yellow Reishi.  The other may be Turkey Tail but I would recommend taking the Turkey Tail Test at MushroomExpert.com  I often go to the Mushroom ID page on Facebook and before I think of injesting any I try other sources also.
I grew Turkey Tail on sawdust bags until I went to the woods next door and found it in many locations.  Funny thing is you start growing mushrooms at home and then you start noticing them everywhere.  
 
pollinator
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Location: Sunizona Az., USA @ 4,500' Zone 8a
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Reishi
 
steward
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Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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Well... Below, I present the strain of reishi Fungi Perfecti is selling.



Note the "stem" on it? Would growing locale change this feature soooo much?
 
Wayne Mackenzie
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Location: Sunizona Az., USA @ 4,500' Zone 8a
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I’ve grown literally hundreds of pounds of conks and antlers. You can manipulate them with light and CO to grow in all sorts of ways.
That’s Reishi.
 
Seriously? That's what you're going with? I prefer this tiny ad:
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