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Using Giblets

 
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What are your favorite ways to use giblets from turkeys or chickens? Do you use all the parts together or do you have separate uses for hearts, livers, gizzards, and other organs?
 
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I make Giblet Gravy or I might use them in the stuffing.

I used to buy them to feed my dogs.

My husband loves fried gizzards and fried liver.  I assume the hearts would be good fried also.

 
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Giblets and rice.  Mom made this regularly.
Clean hearts and gizzards. Cut to bite sized.  Fry with onion. Add enough water, bring to a boil and add rice.
 
Greg Harness
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Anne Miller wrote:I make Giblet Gravy or I might use them in the stuffing.


This is the only way I have ever eaten giblets. Anytime my mother roasted a turkey she always put the giblets in her dressing.
 
Greg Harness
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Roy Hinkley wrote:Giblets and rice.  Mom made this regularly.
Clean hearts and gizzards. Cut to bite sized.  Fry with onion. Add enough water, bring to a boil and add rice.


This sounds wonderful and simple.
 
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The giblets are my favorite part of the bird.  Gizzards are my particular favorite, but I cook, chop, and add all to stuffing.  (And I love my homemade bread stuffing more than anything!)  I boil or bake the giblets, eat a lot of the gizzards and share some with the dogs, before adding them to the stuffing.  
 
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I dice them all (liver, gizzard, heart) and use in a cajun dirty rice recipe.  

Sauté diced onion, celery, pepper with sausage. Add the diced giblets and seasonings. Saute til done and serve with cooked rice.
 
Anne Miller
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Tina, thanks for reminding me that I had forgotten how much I love dirty rice.  I like your recipe because it is simple and easy.

Here is a link to an Cajun recipe:

https://howtofeedaloon.com/authentic-cajun-dirty-rice/
 
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Anne Miller wrote:I make Giblet Gravy or I might use them in the stuffing.

I used to buy them to feed my dogs.

My husband loves fried gizzards and fried liver.  I assume the hearts would be good fried also.


You'd assume correctly! They were one of my dad's all-time favorites, and I love them, too! (As well as the gizzards!)
 
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I mostly just fry them in butter and gobble them down.

I used to make gravy out of them, but I don't eat potatoes or stuffing anymore.
 
Greg Harness
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Roy Hinkley wrote:Giblets and rice.  Mom made this regularly.
Clean hearts and gizzards. Cut to bite sized.  Fry with onion. Add enough water, bring to a boil and add rice.


I like all the suggestions for rice, including dirty rice. How does everyone like to cook their rice? I have an electric stove and I cook rice on the stovetop in an old Revere Ware sauce pan we got for our wedding thirty-some-odd years ago.
 
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In Oz, when referring to poultry, the 'giblets' usually means the gizzard - the part surrounding the grit sack.

After killing several chooks and/or ducks the giblets and hearts would be curried and served as one of the many side dishes to a main curry meal. The same was done with tripe curry, and capsicum & eggplant curry - they're all very rich, so make interesting side dishes with very different flavours, textures and aromas.

We used the livers, fried in butter, with bacon, eggs, tomatoes and potatoes or 'bubble & squeak' for breakfast ... with buttered toast ... yum!
 
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I second what everyone else said.  I rarely do anything special, just throw them right in the pot when making soup or stew.  Or if doing BBQ, I'll scewer them and put them on the grill.  Really nice flavor.  Here in Luhya Land, the gizzard is usually for the man of the house.  So i claimed the heart and liver and proclaimed them the woman's parts.  The liver of a pasture raised chicken is my favorite!
 
Anne Miller
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Greg Harness wrote: How does everyone like to cook their rice? I have an electric stove and I cook rice on the stovetop in an old Revere Ware sauce pan we got for our wedding thirty-some-odd years ago.



This is the recipe that I use

https://www.thespruceeats.com/how-to-cook-rice

Like you I cook on the stovetop of my propane stove, my pan is Revere Ware.

If I am in a hurry or just lazy I heat the water to boiling, throw in the rice, when boiling I put the lid on, turn the heat to really low, cook for 20 minutes then turn burner off and wait 10 minutes before removing the lid.  I use a two parts water/1 part rice.   A lot of times I use bone broth and just add some rice without measuring using the above way.  
 
Greg Harness
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F Agricola wrote:We used the livers, fried in butter, with bacon, eggs, tomatoes and potatoes or 'bubble & squeak' for breakfast ... with buttered toast ... yum!


I will definitely have to try this.
 
F Agricola
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Greg Harness wrote:

F Agricola wrote:We used the livers, fried in butter, with bacon, eggs, tomatoes and potatoes or 'bubble & squeak' for breakfast ... with buttered toast ... yum!


I will definitely have to try this.



We prepare them thusly:

1. Wash thoroughly and remove excess fatty bits, veins and membranes, being careful not to break or tear them
2. Don't slice or cut them up, leave whole
3. Cook slow and low in butter, with salt and pepper - otherwise they'll go hard, become tough, and be mushy in the middle - yuk!

If you like strong flavours such as duck liver pate, this'll hit the mark - breakfast of champions!

We always cook at least a dozen and refrigerate the leftovers for successive days because they're so moreish.



 
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My mom still boils them in a pot with water. They usually go over potatoes or potato-flour dumplings with a mushroom gravy.

I haven't had the chance to try my hand at it yet; my much better half isn't as fond of organ meats as I am, which is to say she doesn't eat them at all. No liver and onions, no haggis, no rokeg blood pie. More for me, I suppose, but I have to save them for when she's not around.

I like the idea of a slow braise in the oven, in covered glass or ceramic ware, in juices that become its own gravy, probably including the broth of the bird, and mushrooms.

-CK
 
Tina Hillel
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Like Chris' wife, I also am not a fan of organ meat.  Being anemic, I need to eat it and I refuse to waste any of the chickens I raise.  I found that dirty rice is the only way I dont mind eating it. I guess the seasonings and cooking with diced sausage or kielbasa is enough to "hide" the giblets.

I have also cooked liver (usually venison, sometimes chicken) with bacon, onion and mushrooms which my husband is a fan of.  

I also cook rice on an electric stove with Revere Ware pan.  I usually cook the rice in a 2 to 1 ratio with chicken bone broth.
 
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The turkey giblets and all the veg peelings go into a huge pot to make the stock for giblet gravy. After the main meal, I strip the turkey and put the bones int the remai ing stock, top it up and continue to cook untill I have a sumptuous stock that I use when I cookup  all the leftovers - turkey pie, turkey and bubble and squeak, turkey curry.
Chickenlivers are used for pate, with Irish butter and the feet go into the chicken bonebroth to make it extra yummy and then they go into the dogfood I make.  I have never heard of cooking the gizzards though. I might give it a go.
 
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Greg Harness wrote:What are your favorite ways to use giblets from turkeys or chickens? Do you use all the parts together or do you have separate uses for hearts, livers, gizzards, and other organs?


hearts ground and formed into patties make a slightly chewier burger


livers for pate, mousse or parfait.


gizzards can be marinated for 24 hours in soy sauce, ginger, garlic and your favorite spice mix and skewered and char-grilled yakitori style.
(zest is fine in the marinade but acids like vinegar and citrus will noticeably alter the texture of gizzards and should only be added right before serving)


and these recipes work for most offal, not just giblets from poultry.
 
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