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Posts: 147
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama)
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Do Kiwi and Schisandra vines require chill hours to grow? 

I am wanting to keep my vines growing inside over the winter but am concerned this may be harmful. 

They are both very small and I know they wont fruit for a couple of years.

Thanks
 
garden master
Posts: 888
Location: SW Missouri
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Hardy kiwi? Issai? Or a regular kiwi? If so, variety name might be important...
A quick search gave me:
Vincent and Tomuri are very low chill varieties needing only about 100 hours of chilling. The Issai hardy kiwi differs in many respects from the other two. It is self-fruitful and the vine can be grown in Zones 5 to 9, withstanding much colder temperatures than Vincent and Tomuri.

So if it's an Issai hardy kiwi, looks like it can handle zone 9, which would be fine in Huntsville AL, zone 7 or 8 depending on your microclimate.

No guess on Schisandra.
And only one search on Kiwi.
Mostly just bumping your post so more people notice it :) Good question, needs a better answer than me :)
 
pollinator
Posts: 1622
Location: La Palma (Canary island) Zone 11
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My lowest is +8Âșc and I would like to grow some kiwi, if somebody knows which can grow in such conditions. Maybe the yellow one with less hairs? The north of the island is more fresh, and some people grow kiwi, still with only positive temps.

How "high" can be a "chill hour" for kiwi?

Schisandra grows in the island, but for me this is a tree! I have to check the exact name...
 
Posts: 1793
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Regular "fuzzy" kiwi are tropical and don't need chill hours.
 
gardener
Posts: 4890
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Good Info S Bengi, 
Hardiness means cold resistant. You can not grow Vanilla unless it is always warm, year round.
hardy Kiwi has been developed so people in non tropical climates can grow this fruit.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1793
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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If you stratify the seeds in a fridge they should sprout or if you can buy the live plant (potted or bare root). It will not die, but it might not produce any fruits or seeds for you. That happened to alot of "American/European" apple trees in the tropics in my youth.

The fact that Schisandra chinensis is hardy to USDA Cold Hardiness Zone 4 makes me think it will not be too happy in your tropical environment. But if you plant alot of seeds you might find a few that does well for you. I have seen that happen to American/European apples in the tropics.

That said the Schisandra genus has quite a few species that is native to tropical SE Asia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schisandra
And the family is listed as being tropical too. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schisandraceae

So with an entire genus and family with tropical members it is quite possible that the local Schisandra that is a tree vs a vine is okay and edible. But I would check with the locals to see if they eat from the tree and at what average dosage. Schisandra is listed as a Chinese medicinal and if the avg person only eats 5units and you start eating 60units. I would be on the lookout for possible complications.
 
Dennis Bangham
Posts: 147
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama)
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The local variety to me is also known as Bay Star Vine which apparently is "Threatened" because it is so hard to find.  I will keep on the lookout since the berries may be noticeable unless the squirrels beat me to them.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1793
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Dennis
I would plant both the hardy kiwi and the fuzzy kiwi, the males will pollinate both species but not artic kiwi and it's hybrids.
I would plant this species of schisandra, it seems tropical enough. https://onegreenworld.com/product/apricot-blush-2/

I am glad that you posted this question, I just remembered that I wanted to try growing some fuzzy kiwi all the way up here in New England. Hopefully my vendor still have some.
 
Dennis Bangham
Posts: 147
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama)
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Maybe in the future I will look for the other varieties of schisandra.  I have some of the Eastern Prince and another mystery type already on order.  I will grow them under 30% shade cloth after I let them get bigger by using an inside greenhouse.  If i have too I can increase the shade to 50%. 
I do have have several hardy and fuzzy males and will over plant in the spring to see what does best or even survives.  I have 50% shade cloth over the kiwi and will raise all the plants onto mounds over the winter. Sort of a struggle of not too hot and not too wet.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1793
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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I also have Chicago Hardy figs, are you growing figs?
The Bitter orange tree is covered with fruits, I plan on making some marmalade all these years and I have never made a citrus "jam".
Also have pomegranate too but lets just say I still haven't tasted one yet.
Muscadine Grapes also survive and also gives me a harvest too.
One of these days I will have to experiment with some Uzbek Pistachios, but I think the nuts will get eaten by fungi in the Humid east coast.  


Zone-pushing can be fun, when you finally get that one out of 10 cultivar that does will on your plot of land.
 
Dennis Bangham
Posts: 147
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama)
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I have some LSU Purple Figs that seem to be doing good.  I grow muscadines and bunch grapes.  Asian Pears and Asian Persimmons, Jujube and Goji Berry. Along with Kiwi, Pluots and Plums and this year Pawpaw and schisandra.  I grow mushrooms on logs but have learned that only the cool and cold varieties are worth pursuing because bugs get the warm and hot one.  I grow mushrooms inside but only fall to spring since there is no A/C in my workshop.
I have recently learned about citrus varieties at Mckenzie Farms, that can endure down to 13F to 15F.
 
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