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How do I dispose kitchen waste and garden waste in an eco-friendly manner?

 
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Ideas to dispose kitchen waste!!!
 
gardener
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Simplest method is to bury it. Feeds the worms and the soil. Very easy if you have established beds with loose soil. It takes no further work vs worm beds, compost piles, etc. Morel mushrooms can be grown in soil. Instructions call for burying kitchen scraps for several weeks to feed them.

Do not dispose of it, utilize it. Interesting choice of words.

 
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Make a food-scraps heap with straw or other high carbon material and put the scraps out there gradually/daily, covering them with straw. Turn occasionally to keep it aerobic. I find this works well. Whenever I go to turn it I find that most of the scraps have decomposed. If you find that you have too much straw Vs nitrogen you could try peeing on it or, if modesty is an issue, adding some manure/blood&bone.
 
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To expand on what Wayne advised:

Dig a trench no more than 30cm (one foot) deep with the dirt piled along one side. Fill it progressively with kitchen scraps and optionally a small amount of manure and/or lime and cover with the soil. Keep moist.

It will breakdown to very good compost-like, worm attracting and water holding loam.
 
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Depending on your situation, chickens and/or pigs might be an excellent choice. I like the idea of my food scraps turning into bacon!
 
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Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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Between the pigs, poultry and dogs we have 0 kitchen waste. Every single thing gets eaten.
 
master steward
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Everyone has giving some great suggestions.

I have almost zero kitchen waste.

We do a good job of cleaning our plates so there is no leftovers. If we do have some the dog gets almost all the leftovers, except ham and pork which usually goes into the bone broth.

Bone are made into bone broth then ground to be added to the garden.

Coffee and tea grounds go into the garden to build up the soil.

What doesn't go into the bone broth, like potato peeling and other scraps are given to the wildlife.
 
wayne fajkus
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Anne, how are you grinding the bones? Sounds interesting.
 
Anne Miller
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I read about making bone meal here at permies.  I can't seem to find that post.  I haven't tried it with anything other than chicken bones.

After making bone broth, the chicken bones are reall soft so I put them in a blender.

Here are a couple of posts that might be of interest, they just don't tell how to do it.

https://permies.com/t/69025/Compost-Bin#580233

https://permies.com/t/22228/Bokashi-Bones
 
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Location: SW PA USA zone 6a altitude 1188ft
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When I kept pigs the only thing they didn't eat was citrus peel. They also didn't eat meat or bone scraps cause they never got any. But no matter how you disguised the peels they were left. untouched, but licked off.
 
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We started drying our citrus peels and using them for the woodstove.  The oils in the peel make them great as kindling.  I also soak some in vinegar for cleaning solutions and occasionally make candied peel for baking and snacking.
 
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