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Automatic chicken doors: fox proofing a coop for when away or late  RSS feed

 
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Forgetting to close the chicken door, or having to work late one day, and the fox sneaks into the coop: all chicken dead.

What are the ways to stop the fox?

Fly-in door: an opening for the chicken is placed 2 m above the ground, chickens fly in, the fox don’t.
Pro: no maintenance needed
Con: only works with light breeds
Needs training
Does not work against owls

A variant to this is made by using ladder steps on poles, so the chicken can climb up instead of flying all the way. I was thinking to electrify 1 step from 2, and the others are grounded. So if a chicken is on it, no problem, but as soon as the fox makes a contact PAF!
Counterweight door closing:
Made public by a contest of mother earth news https://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/raising-chickens/automatic-coop-door-contest-winners-zw0z0113zbla
The drawing is needed to understand the concept: As soon as the chicken all sit on the roost, their weight puts down the door. Needs adjustments to the amount of chicken, but seems to work quite well according to the article.

Automatic doors with light sensors or timers:
Different models exist, some with timers, others with light sensors. The timer can be a problem as the chicken may be outside when it closes in summer… the fox has a party!
https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/metal-aluminum-automatic-chicken-coop-opener_60737298159.html?spm=a2700.galleryofferlist.normalList.22.72c593afxJn0wN&s=p
https://www.thehappychickencoop.com/automatic-chicken-coop-door/
Gravity led chicken doors (the cheaper ones) seem to be a problem in areas with raccoons, as they learn how to open the door.
Some reviews of the light sensors say that in cloudy weather the chicken may be locked out.

What else?


 
pollinator
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I use the "pullet shut" automatic door. I can elaborate on its pros and cons.

1. Use the light sensor, not a timer. As the seasons change (sundown comes sooner) you can get in trouble trying to adjust it in time,  not to mention the hassle of doing so.

2. Get their upgraded solar panel with charge controller. Its a peace of mind thing. If the battery drains down you just lost your chickens. The charge controller has a digital readout showing battery voltage.  You can glance at it when you walk by, give them feed and water, etc.

3. Theres a magnet included. Place the magnet on the circle and it will open and/or close it. Boom. You just verified it works. I attached it to a string and tied it to the coop.

4. Only maintenance needed is a drop of oil on a hinge. Twice a year? Easy enough.

5. Since its a hinged door vs a guillotine door that slides down, it can't get cocked and stuck.

6. Cant think of any cons right now.
 
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Just lock them up for the week that you are away,
and setup automatic feeding/water and clean out the coop and laydown alot of carbon.


This is a wonderful topic. It is a struggle to go on vecation when you have animals on your homestead.
CAT (pet) is the most self-sufficient. but automatic feeding/watering can be set up and safety is pretty okay
DOG (pet) would need need automatic feeding/watering set up, not sure how it would interact with other farm animal and also roaming
CATTLE/GOAT/SHEEP There exist automated commercial feedlot operations, if you are only going for a week. You might be able to just leave them on a couple acre pasture.
FISH if it is natural pond, then you are already good, you could also setup some automated feeding system too.
BEE okay bees are officially the most vacation friendly animals to have.
 
wayne fajkus
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Another option is a fenced area for their daytime running area. The coop is in this fence. It could be 4 fenced paddocks to rotate them through. It could be electric or not.
 
S Bengi
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pioneer
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S Bengi wrote:Just lock them up for the week that you are away,
and setup automatic feeding/water and clean out the coop and laydown alot of carbon.


We usually have a farm-sitter come feed and water the animals when we are away. My ducks are new to the equation, and we haven't gone away since the ducks have been out in the run and gotten their own house to sleep in. I like the lock 'em up idea. I know I could get a farm-sitter to feed and water in the duck house. I think I'd have a really rough time getting anyone to come out daily at dawn and dusk to open and close the house. My ducks do go in their house at night, but usually I have to herd them. I'd worry that an automatic door on a light-sensitive timer would close without the ducks inside.
 
pollinator
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I used the Ador automatic door on the coop. I have it on a 6v battery which I change a couple times a year. When I tire of that I will make a small solar setup, but honestly I just haven't gotten to it.

My chickens are in a poultry solar electronet paddock anyway, so they should be safe with or without the door.

Automatic feeder was easy, just a 4" PVC tube with a J on the bottom. It lasts them easily a week with a dozen chickens.

Waterer is a nipple waterer connected to a 20 gal tank that gets refilled from the coop roof. I haven't ever had to take water to them.

We leave them for a week without worries.
 
gardener
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My solution is a secure coop with an automatic door that leads to a secure run with a manual chicken door on it.  In the summer the auto door lets them into the run at 7am.  When I get around to it, I let them out and they free range all day.  At dusk they come into the coop and the auto door closes them in.  Then I manually close the run door. If I forget then they birds are safe but they get to crow at my bedroom window at 7:01.

This way if we're going on vacation or have a garden tour we can leave them constrained to the run.

I have the "add-a-motor" automatic chicken door which is ok (not great).  I installed a Pullet Shut door for some friends and I liked it a lot.

I was going to do the counterbalanced (chicken operated) door but I'm glad I didn't.  The weight of my flock keeps changing so I'd have to keep rebalancing the system. 
 
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How about pigs?
 
pollinator
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Great discussion. The foxes decimated our Guinea hen flock this year. I did not know what killed so many of them until one evening I heard  our dogs barking at something in a tree and went to look at what the hubbub was. I didn't even know foxes could climb trees! With Winter coming fast I need to do something for the one Guinea hen we have left. With these suggestions I feel perhaps we can replenish the flock this Spring knowing we did our best to keep the birds safe. I like the idea of an electric fence around their run area. I still need to finish the top for the poultry pen. I hadn't come up with a plan for opening and closing the door to their house. With this information I think I can build a door that operates on a light detecting circuit. Light detecting circuit tutorial
Great idea thanks. I'll update you on how this goes.
Brian
  
light-detecting-circuit.jpg
[Thumbnail for light-detecting-circuit.jpg]
 
hans muster
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One other thing I was thinking about:

Some people complain that when the automatic door is closing, sometimes some chickens are still outside. To avoid this, how complicated would it be to have, seconds before the door closes, a sound and an automatic distribution of a few grains the chickens like? The sound would train the ckicken in a Pavlowian manner to go in, eat the snack, and the door closes.

If someone versed in electronics (Brian?) could tell me if it is feasable...
 
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I have never seen a pig attack chickens
 
Brian Rodgers
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hans muster wrote:One other thing I was thinking about:

Some people complain that when the automatic door is closing, sometimes some chickens are still outside. To avoid this, how complicated would it be to have, seconds before the door closes, a sound and an automatic distribution of a few grains the chickens like? The sound would train the ckicken in a Pavlowian manner to go in, eat the snack, and the door closes.

If someone versed in electronics (Brian?) could tell me if it is feasable...


Absolutely it is possible, in fact it should be exceedingly simple, I think.
Their construction should be exceedingly simple, I think
No seriously, having electronics knowledge is really helpful for creating these little projects. I haven't done electronics in ten years, but I still have many components left after closing down my last service shop. I'll see what I can do and post the results and questions here.
Brian
 
hans muster
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Great, please keep us up to date. On instructables.com there are a few really nice systems, self-locking among others.
What do you think of the idea of the Pavlov bell to teach the chicken to enter the coop?
 
Brian Rodgers
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I'll go check out instructables and get an idea what people are already doing. The Pavlov bell idea is great, I wish we would have done the dinner bell thing when we fist got the Keets. This is giving me hope that we can try a flock of birds again.

Brian
 
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