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cooking blind spot  RSS feed

 
Len Ovens
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Location: Vancouver Island
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I think sometimes we have a (cultural?) blind spot. We have this list of how certain dishes are to be cooked and on/in what type of cooker. Take pancakes for example... cooked on a stove top... right? Check this out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vq-XUGzqMOo&feature=player_embedded

Obviously a cooler climate... notice the child peeking out from their bed... on top of the Teplushka. Notice how the pancake is lifted from the pan... try than on your non-stick cheapo pan...

Heres a better explanation:

http://kirpichiki.pro/engl/pancakes-in-russian-oven.html

A Teplushka can be fired in two ways. It looks like the weather is warm when this was done because it is being fired in the oven. This heats the house the least amount because the smoke (flue gas) goes straight up flue. There is also a fire box for for remote firing and when used the flue gas goes through the oven, back down under the oven and then up the flue so that the whole mass is heated (2 or 3 tons?). This particular Teplushka must have the remote firebox at the back, but there are variants with the firebox at the front that also heat an iron cooking surface where the ledge is just in front of the hearth in this one... making a complete cooking set up.

Sometimes we forget there are more ways of doing things than we are used to... like baking bread on a vertical surface as in a tandoori oven. The whole solar cooker area also requires different cooking techniques. (slower cooking at lower temperatures... but free heat) Or retained heat (which already has it's own thread).

Anyone else have some unusual cooking methods/devices? Ways of making do without an "essential" cooking appliance? I think there is a key to cooking off grid without electric or propane in the idea that things don't have to be cooked in a certain way that we've always done before.
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Thermettes boil water really fast with a few sticks.
'Invented' in New Zealand, although the design's so simple I find it hard to believe it's not pinched.
They used to be standard kit for families to take along on outdoor missions but were mostly forgotten. Then like many old-school, low-tech things, they've been rediscovered and now cost a bomb.
If you come across a cheap old one that's not rusted out, get it!
http://www.thermette.com/thermette_history.htm
 
Ken Peavey
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That's it!  The Thermette-there was a post with a photo of one of these, the poster was asking around to figure out what it was.
 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
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Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Wow!  I would really like to have one of those.  For just the two of us we could do all of our daily cooking with just a few sticks.  And coffee or tea at the same time.  Thanks for posting the link.
 
                              
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Hey Leila, there's a guy in Chch making them out of copper (so they'll last indefinitely). You can get them on trademe. Not totally sure if this is the same buy but looks like he's exporting to the US too -

http://www.thermette.com/
 
Robert Ray
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Siilar to a storm kettle. Think I've seen them on Lehmans and in permaculture magazine.
http://www.eydonkettle.com/
 
Thelma McGowan
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Location: western Washington, Snohomish county--zone 8b
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Did that guy add the oil to his pan with half of an onion on a fork??

That was a really interesting way to add seasoning?? I am gonna try that.
thanks for shareing
 
Len Ovens
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Location: Vancouver Island
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auntythelma wrote:
Did that guy add the oil to his pan with half of an onion on a fork??

That was a really interesting way to add seasoning?? I am gonna try that.
thanks for shareing


yes he used onion... recommends using the bottom half as it stays together better. Potato works too.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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