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Buying a Permaculture Property

 
Posts: 167
Location: MAINE
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question: Based apon Sepp's design of water ponds on top of his property.

is that a much better  "Value"  for water storage and power generation (because of gravity)
at a lower cost per acre than say a property that is already cleared has rolling hills or flat.

Or is it more cost productive to not farm on a slope
build some ponds and just pump water to where ever you need it?

in other words:  If you want to purchase the ideal property for permaculture
is there a formula (type of land) for sucess that you want to look for?
 
pollinator
Posts: 11802
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Personally I would look for land with a slope.  Preferably slopes facing various compass points, but in the north, most facing south or southeast.  Not too steep.
 
Posts: 418
Location: Eugene, OR
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Some rolling land on a gentle south-facing slope.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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well most of our land is fairly flat but does slope slightly to a wetter area where we put in our pond..

as for sepps land..it takes years of work to build all those ponds on a steep slope, and lots of money and equipment..so if you have the time, equipment and money to do it..then go for it if that is what you want..

myself I'd rather have land that is more natural for ponds than to have to work so hard to get them
 
Posts: 631
Location: NW MO
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I always recommend that it is easiest to buy land that has no zoning and no restrictions.
 
Raven Sutherland
Posts: 167
Location: MAINE
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ronie wrote:
I always recommend that it is easiest to buy land that has no zoning and no restrictions.



helps to have cash...no colateral needed for raw land (no dwelling)
and no mortgage to pay

Good Point Brenda....
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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North facing slopes are very useful in regions that often get hit by a late frost.  Fruit trees on a N slope will bloom a little later, and be less subject to the late frost killing the blossoms.
 
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