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Fruit Tree - protection from bugs

 
                              
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Hi there,

I'm looking for advice about how to get the bugs out of my fruit trees.

My plum seems to have worms in all of the fruit and the apples have what I believe are moth larvae trails through out.

I've tried the red sticky bug balls to keep the bugs away but it didn't work. Is there something I can do short of the bug spray my dad always used?
 
Leah Sattler
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I'm no expert but I think there are some spray solutions that are organic. Keeping old fruit off the ground as well as thinning the fruit when neccessary helps too. Maybe someone with more expertise will chime in.
 
paul wheaton
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I think the first step is to identify the bug!

Can you post a picture here? 

It also helps to give us an idea of what region you are in. 

 
Susan Monroe
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Location: Western WA
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Could you be more specific as to why the sticky balls didn't work? 

When did you put them out?  Your local cooperative extension service* should be able to tell you when is the optimum time.

Did the balls collect so many bugs that there was no place left for a bug to stick?  If you clean the balls, then cover them with plastic wrap and then coat them with the Tanglefoot sticky stuff, you can replace the plastic and stickum fairly quickly and easily.  If you are in a high-density insect area (for the insects you're having trouble with), you may need to add more sticky balls.

Some insects (larvae) hatch out in the soil from last year's infested fruit, then crawl up the tree trunks to get to the new fruits.  You can help to prevent this by wrapping some plastic wrap firmly around the trunk and applying Tanglefoot to it.  If necessary, replace it, or the new wave of larvae will crawl right over the top of the dead ones.

If you have a place where you can have chickens, they can be a big help in cleaning up fallen fruit and the insects they contain.  Otherwise, you'll have to pick them up and dispose of them yourself.  Leaving them on the ground just multiplies your problems for next year.

Sue
 
Susan Monroe
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Location: Western WA
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Oops!  I meant to include a website for all American Cooperative Extension Service offices:
http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/

Sue
 
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