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Beekeeper suit that prevents bees from dying

 
Posts: 30
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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I made a video about the new suit that I have designed to prevent bees from dying when stinging the fabric, it contains the measurements and details of all suit sizes for the beekeeper so that it can be used by anyone who wants to make it.

https://youtu.be/BZP0E2eNABg

 
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Location: On the plateau in TN
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Possible visitar los bees weekly.  Use smoke to calm them down?
 
Oscar Perone
Posts: 30
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Michael Moreken wrote:Possible visitar los bees weekly.  Use smoke to calm them down?



Thank you for writing to me, Mr. Michael Moreken.

In Permapiculture, we do not use smoke, because we only open our hives to harvest them, and we do it at night using red light that is invisible to bees.

But there is a more powerful reason why we do not use smoke.

I explain myself:

The bees are native to the forests, and for not less than 80 million years, they inhabited immense trees with hollows produced for them by lightning, because the rays fall methodically at telluric crosses and the bees NEED to live on a crossing of this type.

Beekeepers have been convinced that the smoke calms the bees.

But in the native forest, for the bees, the smoke means FIRE, and the forest fire means almost certain DEATH.

The nearness of death stresses any living being, and a being of any species that is stressed is lowering its defenses and opens the door to any predator, such as a disease, who wants to take advantage of the situation in which is: DESPROTECTED, UNARMED.

That is why the smoke does not calm the bees, puts them in alarm, stresses them, they feel in danger of disappearing and act accordingly, filling the crop with the nectar that has been elaborated, or with honey if there is no entrance of nectar, to make sure you have provisions if you need to look elsewhere that is not in danger of fire, a hole to move the colony.

In 1966 I read a magazine called Gaceta del Colmenar, published by SADA, an acronym in Spanish of Sociedad Argentina de Apicultores, and in that number of the 50s, there was a scientific work made in the United States that showed that EVERY OPENING of a hive, It loses about five kilos of honey from the next harvest.

I think it's to meditate.

I beg you to forgive me if there is an error in my language because I am translating by software.

I greet you from Argentina.
 
Michael Moreken
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Typical normal bees when they encounter smoke they load up on honey and prepare to leave, so they tend to be calmer.
 
pollinator
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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I prefer spaying bees with sugar syrup, which makes them unable to fly due to wet wings, and it is food (like feeding a dog steak to break in, hehehe), and the other bees that didn't get sprayed will even come over to help groom and feed.

I smoking does work too, but I think it works on the lessor of two evil. If I saw a river of lava coming down to my house I would be less worried about someone picking a few apples from my backyard and more worried about grabbing my emergency bag and running away.  But in regular/calmer times I would instead put down my drink and run outside to get rid of the unknown person on my property taking my things.
 
pioneer
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Oscar Perone wrote:

Michael Moreken wrote:Typical normal bees when they encounter smoke they load up on honey and prepare to leave, so they tend to be calmer.



Let me ask you a question with all due respect Mr. Michael Moreken:

Would you be calm if your house was filling with smoke and therefore in danger of disappearing by fire?



This is a false analogy. Bees are not people, and it serves no one to speculate on what bees might be experiencing based on human behaviour. On the other hand we can directly observe bees behaviour with and without smoke without any need for dubious analogies.

In my own bees I find smoke incredibly useful and their behaviour is markedly more aggressive toward me and others when smoke is not used. When keeping bees in an urban area, and in my case within a school, it is essential for me to use what ever methods are needed to manage their behaviour.
 
Oscar Perone
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Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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I hope this information serves you.

I greet you from Argentine
 
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