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Does anyone recognize what type of herb this is?  RSS feed

 
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Does anyone recognize what type of herb this is? Thank you.
 
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I can't see clearly but if there is a rosette of big soft big pale green leaves at the base, I would say it is mullein.
It's a keeper

 
pollinator
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Looks like Lamiaceae, mint tribe. Could be a basil...gotu kola?
 
Judith Browning
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I got a better look...I'm way off with mullein

Mint family looks right as Phil says...doesn't look like a basil I'm familiar with though.

I do see some purple flowers on the seed stalk.

I have two kinds of skull cap and one has similar leaves and a shorter flower stalk with purple flowers...

Is this something you've planted so there are choices of what it might be?
 
garden master
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A closer look at the leaves and some information about the height of the plant and where it is located might be helpful, maybe the zone.

The flowerhead reminds me of my blue sage after the petals have fallen off, like this:




Blue Salvia:




.

 
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How about Hyssop?
 
Judith Browning
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Anne, your blue salvia photo looks a lot like the leaves I see in the OP's photo.  I found if I click on that image it opens another page and there I can click to enlarge and get a nice view of the leaves and flower.

 
Judith Browning
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Daniel Brockett wrote:How about Hyssop?



Anise hyssop might be close.  Mine has similar leaves but shorter flower stalks.

That would be easy to distinguish by smell for sure.

 
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Anne Miller wrote:A closer look at the leaves and some information about the height of the plant and where it is located might be helpful, maybe the zone.

The flowerhead reminds me of my blue sage after the petals have fallen off, like this:




Blue Salvia:




.

Ann what a stunning plant and love the colour :)
 
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It looks like mullein to me.  The fuzzy-leafed rosette at the base combined with the tall flower stem with yellow blossoms....just like what I have on my property.
 
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Looks a lot like a member of the sage family to me.
 
Judith Browning
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Jane Reed wrote:It looks like mullein to me.  The fuzzy-leafed rosette at the base combined with the tall flower stem with yellow blossoms....just like what I have on my property.



Hi Jane...I think you probably saw my photo in the second post? I thought the OP's image was of mullien also until I was able to enlarge their picture...it does have a few purple flowers showing and much different leaves.

I should probably remove my picture
 
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Mint Family:
Erect, square, branched stems. (YES)
The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs, from oblong to lanceolate, often downy, and with a serrated margin.  (YES)
Leaf colors range from dark green and gray-green to purple, blue, and sometimes pale yellow.  (YES)
The flowers are on a continuum from purple to white and produced in false whorls called verticillasters.  (YES)
The corolla is two-lipped with four subequal lobes, the upper lobe usually the largest. (Hard to see)
The fruit is a nutlet, containing one to four seeds. (Would need a close up)

Sage/Salvia Genus
Unlike the rest of the mint family they ONLY have two stamen vs the usual 4. (I can't really see the flowers clearly in the OP picture)
More often then not they are a bit hairy.


 
Anne Miller
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Gail said:

Ann what a stunning plant and love the colour :)



Blue sage like the bottom picture is what I have.  A permies posted a picture of her garden and it was so pretty that I bought seeds.  They are stunning and easy to care for.  Almost no water needed and the bees and butterflies love it.  And hummingbirds, too!
 
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Judith Browning wrote:I got a better look...I'm way off with mullein

Mint family looks right as Phil says...doesn't look like a basil I'm familiar with though.

I do see some purple flowers on the seed stalk.

I have two kinds of skull cap and one has similar leaves and a shorter flower stalk with purple flowers...

Is this something you've planted so there are choices of what it might be?



I almost said mullein too.
20180716_082931.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20180716_082931.jpg]
 
Gail Dobson
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Judith Browning wrote:I can't see clearly but if there is a rosette of big soft big pale green leaves at the base, I would say it is mullein.
It's a keeper




Judith yours is a "Verbascum Mullein"
 
Gail Dobson
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Herb King wrote:Does anyone recognize what type of herb this is? Thank you.




It looks similar to an Asian foxtail
 
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