Win a copy of Straw Bale Building Details this week in the Straw Bale House forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
stewards:
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Burra Maluca
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Mike Barkley
  • Shawn Klassen-Koop
  • Pearl Sutton

Coffee Drippers -- Finally discovered these great little devices  RSS feed

 
Posts: 538
Location: Middle Georgia
79
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just bought a stainless coffee dripper like the one below off ebay ($6). I am sick of standard coffee makers, my last one died a year ago and I never replaced it. Lived off tea for a while, then began each day with some instant coffee but that stuff really is rather nasty.

I always thought a little filter thingy over a cup should work but didn't know they were a "thing". Turns out there are LOTS of them on the market!

Plus I learned stainless filters make a better richer cup of coffee, turns out the paper filters remove the coffee bean oils which reduces flavor/body. And of course these are perfect for off-grid situations or camping since they only require hot water.

Maybe I am the only one that was unaware of this option, but in case others were too here is a photo:

 
steward
Posts: 3086
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
587
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That is a cool item.  I haven't seen that before - thanks for sharing.

If I can figure out an affiliate link, I want to add this to the "cowgirl coffee" thread over in the frugality forum.
 
Lucrecia Anderson
Posts: 538
Location: Middle Georgia
79
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Julia Winter wrote:That is a cool item.  I haven't seen that before - thanks for sharing.

If I can figure out an affiliate link, I want to add this to the "cowgirl coffee" thread over in the frugality forum.



Amazon sells a bunch of coffee drippers, not sure if they have a $6 stainless model but they probably have something darn close. I assume you are hooked up to the Amazon affiliate program (though if not good for you -- they are evil).

The one I bought off ebay had all 5-star review: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Stainless-Steel-Pour-Over-Cone-Dripper-Reusable-Coffee-Filter-w-Cup-Stand/152805459833?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649
 
Posts: 345
Location: Abkhazia · temperate climate
20
cat forest garden solar trees wood heat woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just don't filter the coffee at all. It sits in the pot for a few minutes – but not long, I drink it hot – and is then decanted into cups. Most of the grains remain in the pot and some at the bottom of the cup.
 
Lucrecia Anderson
Posts: 538
Location: Middle Georgia
79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Sebastian Köln wrote:I just don't filter the coffee at all. It sits in the pot for a few minutes – but not long, I drink it hot – and is then decanted into cups. Most of the grains remain in the pot and some at the bottom of the cup.



Us 'Mericans don't know how to do it that way. :)
 
pollinator
Posts: 156
Location: Zone 3-4 (usually 4) Western South Dakota, central Black Hills
38
bike books building cattle chicken dog food preservation homestead hunting cooking sheep
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lucrecia Anderson wrote:

Sebastian Köln wrote:I just don't filter the coffee at all. It sits in the pot for a few minutes – but not long, I drink it hot – and is then decanted into cups. Most of the grains remain in the pot and some at the bottom of the cup.



Us 'Mericans don't know how to do it that way. :)



😂 Some of us do... the cowboys and girls amongst us. 😉
 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 3086
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
587
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There are many different versions on Amazon. . .  

This one here is in two pieces, the cone sets into a frame, which seemed nice, because you'd only need to wash the cone most days.
 
gardener
Posts: 1593
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
226
food preservation greening the desert solar trees
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like this one that I got on Amazon, with very very fine holes. Since it sits down in your coffee cup, it soaks the coffee for several minutes, like a French press. It's called FORLIFE Extra-fine Tea Infuser and Dish Set. It's easy to carry when travelling or camping. All steel, no glue or plastic.
ForLife-extra-fine-infuser.jpg
[Thumbnail for ForLife-extra-fine-infuser.jpg]
Coffee infuser, light and easy for travelling
 
Lucrecia Anderson
Posts: 538
Location: Middle Georgia
79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Rebecca Norman wrote:I like this one that I got on Amazon, with very very fine holes. Since it sits down in your coffee cup, it soaks the coffee for several minutes, like a French press. It's called



I didn't see that type before. That is neat and yes, like a mini-french press.

Still wonder how I never heard of these drippers after all these years especially since it seems like it would be a "recommended" item when purchasing prep/camping stuff online.

I was at the thrift store the other day and bought an electric kettle, those things heat up water so darn fast they are great for tea, soups, hot water for dog food etc...  The electric kettle got me thinking about making real coffee again and only then did I try different search terms and find the drippers.
 
pollinator
Posts: 535
Location: Southern Oregon
82
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My parents have made their coffee with this type set-up my whole life. It is handy for travel, but, seriously, it's not much cheaper than a cheap coffee maker. My current coffee maker cost $10, new, with the reusable filter.
 
Lucrecia Anderson
Posts: 538
Location: Middle Georgia
79
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Stacy Witscher wrote:My parents have made their coffee with this type set-up my whole life. It is handy for travel, but, seriously, it's not much cheaper than a cheap coffee maker. My current coffee maker cost $10, new, with the reusable filter.



It doesn't take up counter space or require electricity which is the big selling point for me. The price is just an added bonus.
 
Stacy Witscher
pollinator
Posts: 535
Location: Southern Oregon
82
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lucrecia - I get that and I'll likely move to such a system when I need to worry about those things so much, but in my current household, coffee is always brewing. Making a cup of coffee when we drink multiple pots in a day just don't make sense.
 
garden master
Posts: 920
Location: Maine, zone 5
226
food preservation forest garden homestead solar trees wood heat
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Stacy.  For a pot at a time I like using my ceramic drip cone that takes #6 paper filters that get composted with the grounds and it's super easy to use, but I think I'd prefer moving to a paperless stainless version.  One big reason for me moving to that was that I could taste the plastic....yuck....no more coffee makers where anything plastic touches the liquid for me.  I don't miss the plastic ones even a tiny bit.
 
Cindy Skillman
pollinator
Posts: 156
Location: Zone 3-4 (usually 4) Western South Dakota, central Black Hills
38
bike books building cattle chicken dog food preservation homestead hunting cooking sheep
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Rebecca Norman wrote:I like this one that I got on Amazon, with very very fine holes. Since it sits down in your coffee cup, it soaks the coffee for several minutes, like a French press. It's called FORLIFE Extra-fine Tea Infuser and Dish Set. It's easy to carry when travelling or camping. All steel, no glue or plastic.



Thanks for the link. This is PERFECT for me. Simpler and quicker than a French press and good for tea as well! I’m getting one. Ever since DH swore off caffeine I’ve been sporadic with my coffee drinking and I feel my system really benefits from it. It cheers me up.
 
Lucrecia Anderson
Posts: 538
Location: Middle Georgia
79
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In the interest of full discosure, I have gotten my coffee dripper and well...errrmmm...not what I expected.

Pros: Very well made little device. Came with surprisingly nice packaging, Nice branded box with a fancy/elegant little pamphlet inside. The packaging must have cost as much as the dripper itself.

Cons: Takes 3 minutes of constant attention to make a cup of coffee!

First time I used it I poured the water in and it ran out IMMEDIATELY as if the dripper was just a strainer (because it actually IS a fine strainer).  I thought "this can't be right" so I read the instructions. It says "very slowly pour the water for 2-3 minutes over the dripper". Huh??? I am not going to stand there slowly dripping hot water for 2-3 minutes! It never said that in the description!

So now I am dumping a spoon of coffee inside a small jar, filling it with hot water, then after 3-4 minutes pouring it into my cup with a regular cheapo strainer filtering out the grounds.
 
gardener
Posts: 878
Location: Ohio, USA
144
dog fish food preservation forest garden fungi solar trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I got one for my husband and he loves it. No complaints. Sorry yours isn't working out... maybe it's defective??
 
Lucrecia Anderson
Posts: 538
Location: Middle Georgia
79
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Amit Enventres wrote:I got one for my husband and he loves it. No complaints. Sorry yours isn't working out... maybe it's defective??



So the one your husband has drips slowly on its own? Instead of the water flowing through it too fast to brew?

I don't think mine is defective since the instructions even say "pour water slowly over grounds for 3 minutes".  I thought the "dripper" in the name meant IT would do the dripping, not me.
 
Cindy Skillman
pollinator
Posts: 156
Location: Zone 3-4 (usually 4) Western South Dakota, central Black Hills
38
bike books building cattle chicken dog food preservation homestead hunting cooking sheep
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I got mine (the one that sits down in the cup) a couple of days ago and yes, it does take more time than I expected to make a cup of coffee. It doesn’t run straight through, though. My problem with it is that it doesn’t hold a lot of water. It’s not working to just fill it and sit it down in, either because it’s too hard to keep the coffee from floating over its edge. I’m using three heaping Tbsp (ground slightly coarsely) for a mug (2 cup capacity). The water runs through slowly but I still have to stand there pouring a teensy bit at a time or I’d overrun the strainer. All I can say is that it’s a good thing I like tea. It was meant for tea and it’s great for tea. I ordered one of the cone shaped drippers. Will let you know how that works for me.
 
Amit Enventres
gardener
Posts: 878
Location: Ohio, USA
144
dog fish food preservation forest garden fungi solar trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is the one I got him. He says it uses less coffee grounds and about one filling of water is about 1 cup of copy.

E-PRANCE Honeycombed Stainless Steel Coffee Filter, Reusable Pour Over Coffee Filter Cone Coffee Dripper with Removable Cup Stand and Bonus Brush(2nd Generation)
 
Lucrecia Anderson
Posts: 538
Location: Middle Georgia
79
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Cindy Skillman wrote:I got mine (the one that sits down in the cup) a couple of days ago and yes, it does take more time than I expected to make a cup of coffee. It doesn’t run straight through, though. My problem with it is that it doesn’t hold a lot of water. It’s not working to just fill it and sit it down in, either because it’s too hard to keep the coffee from floating over its edge. I’m using three heaping Tbsp (ground slightly coarsely) for a mug (2 cup capacity). The water runs through slowly but I still have to stand there pouring a teensy bit at a time or I’d overrun the strainer. All I can say is that it’s a good thing I like tea. It was meant for tea and it’s great for tea. I ordered one of the cone shaped drippers. Will let you know how that works for me.



Glad to hear it works for tea!

While you wait for your new dripper you might want to try the "jar" method. Works pretty well. Put your coffee and boiling water in a jar (or in the pot that holds the boiling water) and let it brew for 3 minutes, then pour over a strainer and into your mug. I tried that when our European friend Sebastian Köln suggested it.

Kind of funny, making coffee is so simple but somewhere along the line many of us got brainwashed into thinking we need a machine or a special device in order to do it.
 
Cindy Skillman
pollinator
Posts: 156
Location: Zone 3-4 (usually 4) Western South Dakota, central Black Hills
38
bike books building cattle chicken dog food preservation homestead hunting cooking sheep
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good point, Lucretia! I do love me some gadgets, though. I got the pretty shiny thing yesterday and it works great. Not even a teensy dusting of grounds at the bottom of the mug. I’m still gonna try the jar. I always wondered “why not tea bags for coffee?” They did make those for a little while but I guess they didn’t catch on. Yes! We do make things too complicated—or at least I do.
 
Posts: 39
Location: Eastern Kansas
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lol. Makes my butter tub and coffee filter contraption seem almost legit!
 
pollinator
Posts: 168
Location: Manila
29
cooking solar urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lucrecia Anderson wrote:turns out the paper filters remove the coffee bean oils which reduces flavor/body.



wasteful too - how many of those melitta filters aren't properly disposed off?

I assume you are hooked up to the Amazon affiliate program (though if not good for you -- they are evil)

AMEN!!!
 
Surfs up space ponies, I'm making gravy without this lumpy, tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!