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uses for sorbus berries?

 
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How about Mt. Ash berries? It's been a great year and there's so many of them. We're thinking maybe some sorbus juice mixed with a sweetener? Maybe make a jelly out of it?

It sure is a protector against scurvy!
 
Kelda Miller
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I just went for it and brewed something up. There's a great contraption called a 'steamer-juicer', a three compartment stovetop deal that has a spout that eventually fills up with juice. We threw in the berries whole, no pitting, with stems, and out comes juice.

My two experiments. Sorbus + sugar. And another sorbus+ apple+ sugar. I'll wait a month or so to see how it tastes (hopefully I can find more fresh and do another batch, but right now the preserved stuff is precious.) Taste: sugary and tart!

I'd say about two pounds sorbus berry made enough to fill a small (16 oz?) glass juice container. I'll get more specific if anyone is interested. 
 
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Location: Western WA
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There is an interesting article on the harvesting and use of these berries, plus a couple of recipes at Sacred Earth
http://www.sacredearth.com/ethnobotany/foraging/rowan.php

When I looked up 'sorbus recipes', they tended to lean heavily in the direction of jams, jellies and wines.

Sue
 
Posts: 298
Location: Orcas Island, WA
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Kelda,

Make sure to report back! I'm curious to hear how the experiment goes.

For the record there has been a fair amount of breeding work done on the Sorbus spp. In fact I was at Burnt Ridge Nursery a couple years ago and I tried the fruit from one there that was quite tasty out of hand.

Might look into planting a few of those, huh?

Daver
 
Kelda Miller
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Report Back:
(well, since I canned it, I felt like I had to wait for just the right time to pop it open, ie Winter)

A 16oz jar of Sorbus-Apple concentrate I diluted into about a gallon of water, and added a little sugar. Then presented it to my fellow Native Plant Stewards at our Friday training. I added sugar while canning it, then now, and then left out the sugar for any Stewards who don't like tart.

So Instead: I'd do more apples. Maybe 1/10th berries and 9/10th apple. And I'd let it be tart and people can add personal sweetness however they choose.

And, the juice was Really good. A rich pink with some lovely tang. I wish I'd made more.
 
              
Posts: 133
Location: West Iowa
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I have three hybrid varieties called ivan's beauty, ivan's belle, and shipova.  Also have cultivar called rabina mountain ash.  They all suppose to be edible fresh, but if I don't like them, guess wildlife might utilize them. 
 
Dave Boehnlein
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Location: Orcas Island, WA
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Iowa.lk,

I think the one I tried at Burnt Ridge was the Rabina variety. The birds have routinely beat me to the Ivan's Beauties & Ivan's belles. Most importantly, the shipovas are absolutely awesome. Be patient, though. Our tree didn't produce until about year 12. However, it is a stunning ornamental and the fruits are excellent when they come. Although they are partially self-fertile, I would recommend planting a Bosc pear in the vicinity for improved pollination.

Good luck!

Dave
 
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