• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Shawn Klassen-Koop
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Bill Crim
  • Mike Jay

Methods of preserving fresh Turmeric - please share yours  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 1463
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
28
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am currently freezing my supply of fresh turmeric but as my harvest grows larger I would prefer not to depend on my freezer.

Does anyone else have experience with storing a years supply of fresh turmeric? 

Please share the methods that have been successful for you.
 
Posts: 186
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
29
cat chicken fish forest garden homestead hugelkultur cooking transportation trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Have only grown a small amount as a short term test, but researched long term storage as a consequence.

It's perhaps easier to dry and powder it, the dried spice could then be stored in airtight containers, certainly taking up less space per volume.

Another is to pickle it in jars.

I understand other root crops are commonly stored under sand. It may work for turmeric too. Never attempted it - on the list of things to try!
 
Posts: 101
Location: South of Capricorn
16
food preservation homestead rabbit
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I generally just throw it in the bin where i store my potatoes/onions/garlic/ginger (in a dark cabinet). I produce maybe 1 kg per year, I tend to use it whole (grate it as i need it). I usually get the harvest at the end of tropical fall and use it most during the winter, and it will last through to the next harvest. A friend who grows bushels of it keeps it in old fashioned root cellar type conditions, same thing, year round. It gets kind of ugly looking but the taste is the same. Powdering, i think you'd lose potency. I do like the idea of pickling it but I suppose it depends on how you generally use it. I grate it into salty and sweet dishes so I like to have more flexibility.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1161
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
197
books forest garden rabbit solar tiny house woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I grow a lot of turmeric. Being that I live where the ground doesn't freeze, I store most of it right in the ground. I think this means that one could successfully store it in damp sand or peat moss in a root cellar, but I haven't tried that.

I have also frozen some whole, bringing it out to grate as needed. I also sliced and dried it. Once dried and crispy, it was easy to crush into a granular powder. A blender or food processor could make it into a fine powder but I haven't done that. Once powdered, it could be frozen for long term storage without needing to use those deoxygenator packets or silicone packets, or nitrogen gas.
 
Tereza Okava
Posts: 101
Location: South of Capricorn
16
food preservation homestead rabbit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Su Ba wrote:I grow a lot of turmeric. Being that I live where the ground doesn't freeze, I store most of it right in the ground.


Su, how does your crop work in your weather? a single crop a year? constant harvesting? I notice that even in our (rare) frosts the greenery really doesn't die off and i'm never sure when to harvest. I started the garden journal this year to keep track of this, among other things, but so far, insufficient data! (we don't have defined dry/wet seasons, but I did harvest right after a long dry season this winter).
 
Su Ba
pollinator
Posts: 1161
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
197
books forest garden rabbit solar tiny house woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I get one harvest of turmeric a year. January is the primary harvesting month. I wait for the tops to brown and die back because that results in the strongest orange colored "root". Harvested early the roots are yellowish. Still ok for home use but the public doesn't want to buy it. They want a deep, brilliant orange color.

I don't know how to determine when to harvest in your region. I'm fairly a novice when it comes to this crop. I've been growing it for six years now, but I'm still learning. Luckily for me, the signal to harvest is when the plant dies.
 
gardener
Posts: 2448
106
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't particularly like the taste of raw turmeric. It's not worth it to grow it here.  Since it is a way better deal to buy 5 lbs. rather than 1 lb., I buy it in the fall and slice it thin, then ferment it. I like the taste when it is fermented.
John S
PDX OR
 
Tereza Okava
Posts: 101
Location: South of Capricorn
16
food preservation homestead rabbit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks, Su, I`m still learning! Will keep observing. I also note that when I plant them they don`t come up til they want to (i`m in Brazil, so southern hem, I planted some in August, end of winter. it hasn`t come up yet. The roots I have here in the house from last year just started sprouting in storage in the last month or so, since spring officially sprung).

John, do you ferment it like a normal lacto ferment (littl salt, sauerkraut-type)? It sounds great.
 
John Saltveit
gardener
Posts: 2448
106
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, Tereza,
Normal lacto fermentation.
John S
PDX OR
 
This is my favorite show. And this is my favorite tiny ad:
Permaculture Voices 1 - Purchase All the Video Here!
https://permies.com/wiki/pv1
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!