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Favorite fruit to make wine with?

 
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Please don't say grape.

I've made wine and fruitbeers with about ten types of fruit, my favorite (by a long shot) was Jaboticaba.
I think it's also one of the easier wines to make, as the tannins in the skin inhibit microbes and provide a strong flavor.

It's hard to describe how glorious it was, like a deep cherry lambrusco champagne - though that doesn't do it justice.
The dry, bitter notes in the after-taste on the tip of your tongue draw you back for the next sip.

I really regret gifting so much of it, it was lightning in a bottle.


So, what are your favorite fruits to make wine from?
 
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Mustang grapes. Yeast in the skin.

I've also made peach, white grape, and strawberry . Mustang wins everytime.
 
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I haven't made wine.  I aspire to make hard ciders from the various fruits I have in my food forest.  What I imagine I want is raspberry and blueberry infused Meads.  I don't have enough productions yet but I also have big plans for making hard ciders infused with whatever produces a bounty.

I have made some delicious meads and a  few stinkers.   My dream is to have enough mulberry production to make a mulberry mead.  

One of the meads I made was fresh strawberries and lemon balm.  I used way too much lemon balm and the mead tasted like Windex.  
 
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Dandelion wine???
 
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Scott Foster wrote:I haven't made wine.  I aspire to make hard ciders from the various fruits I have in my food forest.  What I imagine I want is raspberry and blueberry infused Meads.  I don't have enough productions yet but I also have big plans for making hard ciders infused with whatever produces a bounty.

I have made some delicious meads and a  few stinkers.   My dream is to have enough mulberry production to make a mulberry mead.  

One of the meads I made was fresh strawberries and lemon balm.  I used way too much lemon balm and the mead tasted like Windex.  




My Great-Grandfather was know for his White Lightning made from apple cider. He would get it nice and fermented, then on a day like today where it is below zero outside (f), he would drill a hole in the cider barrel and draw out the mixture that did not freeze. Obviously that was the really potent stuff. There was not much of it, but really potent.

 
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Kind of a funny farm story during the war.

Back then we had a lot of potatoe ground and he was doing well selling poatoes to the government for the Servicemen. However he needed a way to pick them coming harvest season, so the War Dept sent down the POW's from out of Bangor at the POW camp. They were actually great workers and did a fine job of getting the potatoes in the potatoe house. back then, when that was done, there was a party!

Out came the cider barrels...and that included the guards and POW's.

They went back that night all pretty well lit, so the Comander of the camp came down the next day and asked my Great-Grandfather what he was thinking as he got even the POW's drunk? As it was my Great-Grandfather had (5) boys fighting in against the Germans' to whom he got drunk!

My Great-Grandfather said he did not care, an honest days work was an honest days work and they deserved what they got. But as they talked the Commander of the camp got just as pie-eyed as the POW men the night before so nothing was said of the matter.

Later it was said that German/USA relations went much better because POW's reported back that their treatment in the USA was rather good. I would like to think we had a hand in that.
 
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Gooseberries. I have tons of them but don’t actually like them. However ferment them for a few months and it’s amazing.

My grandfather used to make a stunning nettle wine too but i’ve never been able to replicate it.
 
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I prefer to make liquor things with my fruit (mulberry whiskey or umeshu plum liquor... hard to choose my favorite there) but I also do like to put the fruit in my beer, so it's hard to choose one. ah and dandelion beer might have been the best beer I ever made. no recipe, just playing, it was FABULOUS.

Jabuticabas are awesome, we tend to make syrup out of them and use it for mixers (and pancakes, desserts, etc). I have two pitanga (surinam cherries) that just started and I'm thinking about wine for next year, their flavor is really mild (cherryish plus a pine flavor like jabuticaba) and next year I should get a much larger volume of fruit.
 
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