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Cooking in the riser??

 
pollinator
Posts: 613
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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That looks interesting ... using the riser to cook Tandoori chicken.  I'm unclear if that is charring or soot we are seeing in the video.
Anyway, it's an interesting idea to use the heat once the flames have died back.  I'm definitely going to try that out!
 
Graham Chiu
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Need to get longer skewers!
 
gardener & author
Posts: 1978
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Hey, so nice to see someone here post a link to my good friends at Himalayan Rocket Stoves!

That is delicious roasting and slight charring, not soot at all. Chozang, the Ladakhi guy in that video gave me chicken roasted in the same rocket stove a week ago. Delicious! (He's an excellent cook, so it was spiced perfectly, too). He roasts tandoori kebabs in the heat riser, not in the feed box; in the second video I thought it looked like you were roasting in the feed box, but I'm not sure. Chozang also uses the top of the feed box / burn tunnel for cooking chapatis and pots of food.

Chozang, the Ladakhi seen in the video, and Russell, the Australian voice heard in the video, have been fabricating and selling these for the past two winters. They sold a few dozen last year, and the word of mouth is great, so they sold out earlier than expected this autumn. The local custom is to bring your woodstove inside in the autumn and set it up, and remove it for summer storage. So, although Russell has made some rocket mass heaters, their business here is metal rocket stoves.

They use high-temperature rated stainless steel (SS310) for the hexagonal heat riser, and some kind of ceramic wool for the insulation. The stove you see in the video is in its second winter of use, and seems not to have suffered any destruction of the metal. It gets heavy use -- when it's -20 to -25C (-4 to -13F) outside, Chozang likes to crank it up to +25C (77F) indoors with the rocket stove. It gets regular use from October through March or April.

The stove in the video is their first model, but this year they've introduced taller ones that should be even more efficient.
 
Graham Chiu
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Hi Rebecca

I'm definitely cooking in the riser.  Since these Himalyan stoves are not insulated except in the riser, the stainless steel will likely last a long time since it's not being subjected to very high temperatures as in a RMH.

if they put the stove away in summer, what other cooking appliance do they use instead?
gift
 
Unofficial Companion Guide to the Rocket Oven DVD
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
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