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Resistant to Round Up Hedge

 
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Hiya,

I am looking for a plant which is a bit resistant to herbicides which could be used as a hedge. My mothers property has some highly unpleasant, drug cooking and doing neighbors to one side, she has a large fence which she had planted climbing roses all over but is currently heartbroken as they have all been killed by said neighbors via herbicides. She is not in the financial position to move sadly (and her property is lovely) so I suggested a hedge to help screen her out further, I know some plants are more sturdy against poisons, we would plant them a bit away from the fence line so they wouldn't be as vulnerable as the roses were but still need to be tough. We live on the west coast of New Zealand and her property gets very cold and wet over winter so it has to be something that can endure that.

Any suggestions?
 
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If not a hedge, could you add a privacy fence of wood or something on that side? That would stop spray drift, then you could plant something a bit in front of that
 
pollinator
Posts: 1003
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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A farmer who uses lots of Roundup told me that pine is pretty resistant. The leaves are pretty waxy so it makes sense. I’d try to shield whatever you plant the first year or so.

Did they kill her plants on purpose or just let the Roundup blow her way?
 
Rose Thurston
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It may be possible to try and raise the fence a bit but it would be an obvious move to make (she tries to discreetly not offend). We are not sure if it was deliberate, they just sprayed heavily on their side and it leaked under into the soil, there was some drift though as other parts of her garden were damaged too, they have nothing alive on their side of the fence. Seems only the Blackberries don't mind it.

Perhaps a small variety in the pine family may be an option, I will have a look at what is available, thanks for that.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 514
Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
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Harakeke (NZ flax) is just about impervious to Roundup. I have never seen any of mine get damaged when the council bods spray the footpath. Bonus is the food it provides for tui and bellbirds (and bees).
 
Posts: 75
Location: Cape Town
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Don't see what is wrong with Blackberry, the wilder and thornier the better. I would also suggest Acacia spp., leaving a barrier zone of about 2 ms from the boundary. I have a sweet thorn tree which has grown along the roadside through years of spraying and it is now sweetly developing its own fungus in self-defense, which hangs from the branches in winter. With luck it may inoculate the ground beneath it.

On which note, it might be worth it to,try replanting some climbing roses of the old fashioned heritage type, say "Albertine", "Dorothy Perkins", "Mermaid" or any local variety which thrives well. If you mulch thickly and water once or twice with kombucha or other effective microorganism techniques you will find that the roses' capacity to resist Round Up vastly increases. Climb them up the thorn trees and it will be a lovely sight.

I understand one has to get along with neighbours but no point in being too kind. I suggest a basket of Round Up blackberries in season together with a mild request to please not kill the roses might work your way towards a solution of some sort  :)
 
pollinator
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Location: Toronto, Ontario
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In addition to the microbial boost offered by either kombucha or perhaps an oxygenated compost extract applied liberally to your border area, perhaps amended liberally with organic matter like woodchips, a fungal slurry will start working to break down most contaminants. I don't know what current research says about the ability of fungi to break down glyphosate, but I'm positive that it could only improve the situation for you.

-CK
 
gardener
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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For a hedge you want the species that are very waxy leafed like holly or yew.

Black berry will succumb to roundup. Remediate the soil with a microbial booster as others have mentioned and then add some mushroom mycelium to clean out the herbicides.
 
gardener & author
Posts: 2020
Location: Manitoba, Canada
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I think a nice big berm would help a lot. But I'm saying that without knowing much about your situation.
 
Rose Thurston
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Thank you for those ideas, especially the flax that may work best but will also look at some of the more waxy leaves varieties too. They are violent people so not the sort of folk you can be reasonable with sadly, will likely end up in jail shortly, until then we shall plant a tough hedge
 
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