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Plants with beautiful Fall leaf colors

 
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I know this is right after most of the leaves have fallen this year, but I thought it would be neat to have a place for all of the different plants that have beautiful Fall leaf colors.

This blueberry picture was taken after the prime colorarion had passesd, with a bolder and brighter coloration a few weeks before this, but I think even now it still looks nice.

It's a double bonus when plants can be both edible and beautiful!

20181216_163339.jpg
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Oregon grapes,  the leaves turn red, look like holly, and don't drop. They make a tart little treat. Roots are medicinal and can make a yellow dye.
 
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Aronia melanocarpa - the true miracle fruit with highest antioxidant levels
Aronia-melanocarpa.jpg
[Thumbnail for Aronia-melanocarpa.jpg]
 
Steve Thorn
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Tom Digerness wrote:Oregon grapes,  the leaves turn red, look like holly, and don't drop. They make a tart little treat. Roots are medicinal and can make a yellow dye.



Very neat, I had never heard of this plant. From the pictures I saw online it looks very atttactive with nice looking berries too.

It sounds like it has a lot of other great uses too, what a great plant!
 
Steve Thorn
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Gurkan Yeniceri wrote:Aronia melanocarpa - the true miracle fruit with highest antioxidant levels



Amazing plant! We have these native in my area, however I have yet to taste or find one, but I admit that I haven't really searched hard for one yet.

Do you eat them fresh, or make them into other things?
 
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For those of you in the Pacific Northwest here are a list of some of our native plants that have really nice fall leaf colors. Some of these are not native to the whole region - the Cascades tend to keep some plants on one side or the other.

- Pacific Dogwood
- Vine Maple
- Big Leaf Maple
- Western Serviceberry
- Paperbark Birch
- Red Osier Dogwood
- Black Hawthorn
- Oregon Ash
- Western Larch
- Quaking Aspen
- Black Cottonwood
- Cascara
- Red Flowering Currant
- Golden Currant
- Nootka Rose

I have found these native plants can be hit or miss in terms of fall colors depending on the year. For example, big leaf maple can be amazing and last year the trees around Olympia looked great. But this year they were not as golden as last year - but this year had a much better seed crop than last year.

Some of these plants also have really nice flowers. Red flowering currant is really great in the early spring and I also really like serviceberry flowers too!
 
Steve Thorn
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Daron Williams wrote:For those of you in the Pacific Northwest here are a list of some of our native plants that have really nice fall leaf colors. Some of these are not native to the whole region - the Cascades tend to keep some plants on one side or the other.

- Pacific Dogwood
- Vine Maple
- Big Leaf Maple
- Western Serviceberry
- Paperbark Birch
- Red Osier Dogwood
- Black Hawthorn
- Oregon Ash
- Western Larch
- Quaking Aspen
- Black Cottonwood
- Cascara
- Red Flowering Currant
- Golden Currant
- Nootka Rose

I have found these native plants can be hit or miss in terms of fall colors depending on the year. For example, big leaf maple can be amazing and last year the trees around Olympia looked great. But this year they were not as golden as last year - but this year had a much better seed crop than last year.

Some of these plants also have really nice flowers. Red flowering currant is really great in the early spring and I also really like serviceberry flowers too!



Great list Daron, I really like all the diverse colors. I don't know why, but the golden ones have always stuck out to me and are my favorite!

Those red flowering current flowers were awesome too!
 
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Steve Thorn wrote:It's a double bonus when plants can be both edible and beautiful!



Well, in that case...

 
Steve Thorn
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That looks very nice! What kind of plant is it?
 
Crt Jakhel
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Those are Prima and Sunflower pawpaws (asimina triloba). For 10 years we only had the pretty autumn leaves to look forward to. This year we finally had fruit; 5 years to start flowering + 4 years of various mishaps. It was worth the wait. (But nobody would really mind if it were shorter.)
 
Steve Thorn
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Crt Jakhel wrote:Those are Prima and Sunflower pawpaws (asimina triloba). For 10 years we only had the pretty autumn leaves to look forward to. This year we finally had fruit; 5 years to start flowering + 4 years of various mishaps. It was worth the wait. (But nobody would really mind if it were shorter.)



Very cool!

I thought they looked familiar. I have a paw paw of unknown variety that is a little younger. It flowered for the first time this year but with no fruit. Hoping to get some first fruit this year too!
 
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