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Granite dust  RSS feed

 
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Would it be ok to use granite dust as a type of rock dust to amend my soil?
 
gardener
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Absolutely.  It really is a type of rock dust and in my area granite is a common ammendment.   We're on limestone based soils here, so while I don't know exactly what minerals it brings,  I trust it adds some valuable variation.   With that in mind, I don't know if it would be as helpful in other soil types.
 
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I have to agree strongly with Casie on using granite dust to amend limestone base soils, even sandstone base soils benefit greatly.
Granite rock dust is a great amendment for soils that lean to the basic side of the pH scale, granite base soils lean towards the acidic side so they are very useful in pH balancing.

Most Granites will contain in the vicinity of 50-60 minerals, most will be compound minerals with some crystallization of items such as silica.
 
Michael Olivera
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Thank you both for sharing that information with me
 
pollinator
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What is the source? Around here we have decomposed granite. Its like a crumbly sand and is used for ammending.  With dust i think of byproduct from slab shops. Some slabs have fiberglass/resin backing. Some slabs are resin core(silestone,  etc). The dust cant be separated between slabs that have it or dont have it.
 
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wayne fajkus wrote:Some slabs have fiberglass/resin backing. Some slabs are resin core(silestone,  etc). The dust cant be separated between slabs that have it or dont have it.



That very thing kept me from getting "rock dust" from a local company here that makes counter tops.  They have really beautiful pieces of rock they cut, and I thought that would be a great place to get rock dust until I saw just what you are talking about.  Now I'm looking for a source again.
 
Michael Olivera
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wayne fajkus wrote:What is the source? Around here we have decomposed granite. Its like a crumbly sand and is used for ammending.  With dust i think of byproduct from slab shops. Some slabs have fiberglass/resin backing. Some slabs are resin core(silestone,  etc). The dust cant be separated between slabs that have it or dont have it.


Good point
 
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