Jocelyn Campbell

steward
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since Nov 09, 2008
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books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur purity

Jocelyn's life is all about balance. Maybe that's why she's an accountant and is such an advocate for keeping our natural systems healthy.
As a child, she perched on branches, collected moss and fungus, caught frogs and snakes, and climbed up into swaying tree forts in her beloved Pacific Northwest woods. Then, as a teenager, she learned that reining in sugar kept her more alert and energetic. These youthful observations grew into passions for walks in the woods, gardening, herbal remedies, and natural parenting with whole and traditional foods. More recently, Jocelyn's interest in the natural and healthy led to all things permaculture and she completed her first permaculture design course in 2010.
Jocelyn enjoys helping 1- and 2- person micro-businesses spend less time on their bookkeeping, or putting on feast nights at wheaton labs (the permaculture community where she lives with her guy, Paul Wheaton), or helping achieve further world domination for the richsoil.com/permies.com empire.
Missoula, MT
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Recent posts by Jocelyn Campbell

And I'd hoped my Monday *wouldn't* feel like this. Sigh. (And *giggle!*)

6 hours ago
Oh, and folks asked for two other recipes.

Beans
Here is what I do to cook beans - black beans, pinto beans, chick peas, etc. I usually start with 3 to 4 cups dried beans.

Rinse the beans and pick out any green, dried out, or unappetizing looking beans, pick out any debris.

Soak overnight in plenty of water with a splash of lemon juice (or a splash of apple cider vinegar).

In the morning, drain and rinse the beans again, and add to crock pot with enough fresh water to be slightly less than double the soaked, rinsed beans measure. (I never measure the water. Add extra water if unsure or if you're going to be away from the crock pot all day. If the top layer starts to dry out, add more hot water.)

In addition to the beans, add the following to the crock pot, too:
--1/2 capful Organic No Salt Seasoning (from Coscto)
--1 to 2 bay leaves
--1/2 to 1 onion, diced
--3-4 garlic cloves, minced

Cook on high to bring up to temperature, then after an hour or two, turn to low and cook another 6 hours or so until tender. If your beans are stale, they might need to cook on high longer.*

Do not add salt until beans are tender - then salt to taste, often 1-3 teaspoons, ideally at least half an hour before serving so that the salt incorporates into the beans.

If making beans for Mexican food, adding cumin, coriander, chili powder, oregano, thyme, basil, etc. are fun additions, too.

*Note, if your beans are a bit old or stale, they might not cook easily or could remain a bit hard after all day in the crock pot, even when the crock pot is left on high heat. If that's the case, and you have more stale beans to cook, either sprout your beans (more about sprouting beans here and here), or, add a "quick soak" method in addition to, or in place of, the overnight soak.

A "quick soak" is boiling the beans for 10 minutes, then draining off the water and rinsing, then starting the actual cooking (on the stove or in the crock pot) with fresh water. I have added 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda to the "quick soak" I've been doing for some of our older, less fresh beans recently and I think it has helped, too.

Hummus
I'd cooked some chick peas as above, and had lots leftover for hummus. I made this recipe twice, the first time with fresh squeezed lemon in the amount called for in the recipe and the hummus was a bit too lemony. The second time I made it, I used about 2/3rds the fresh lemon juice measure called for and it seemed just about right.

Easy and Smooth Hummus Recipe


I forgot that some folks asked about how to make the Switchel! See this post for a link to the Switchel (that drink) I served at the pizza party, and for a link to the dough recipe we used for the pizza crust.

David, those pictures are awesome, thank you!!

Some of the recipes you asked for are here.
Some folks were asking for some recipes, so I'll link a bunch here and write out one more.
  • stevia lemonade (a post earlier in this thread)
  • Switchel recipe
  • polydough - this is the bread dough we use for pizza crusts, plus dinner rolls, hamburger and hot dog buns, bread sticks, rustic bread loaves, etc.
  • recipes for surplus eggs - esp. Dutch babies
  • Allrecipes.com Ratatouille - we had a LOT of leftover mozzarella cheese from the pizza party - HA! So I put mozzarella on top of this to make it more of a main dish.


  • Overnight Oats
    These are cooked overnight oats, not the soaked overnight oats that are not cooked. This is breakfast cereal I can get behind! I think I first learned the basics of making these from Katelin Ginther who has cooked for our events several times and to rave reviews.

    One of my five (!) crockpots has a warm setting that I use overnight for these oats. This warm setting does not scorch the edges of the oats as some of my other crock pots do. Alternatively, bring the liquids to a boil and pour over the rest of the ingredients in a thermos or thermal cooker, or bring all to boil in a pot on a burner and then put the pot in a haybox cooker over night.

    These ingredients are based on two cups liquid to one cup old-fashioned rolled oats - the slow cooking kind, not instant or quick cooking. The apples technically do add a bit of liquid, but if you prefer three cups liquid to one cup oats, you might wish to increase the liquids a bit more. Basically, it's substituting half the water measure with full fat coconut milk. If you prefer steel cut oats, adjust the total liquids to four cups liquid per one cup steel cut oats, of course, again, with half the liquid being the full fat coconut milk. Steel cut oats - the kind that cook even slower than old-fashioned rolled oats! - do get fully done with this method, too.

    For 8 or so healthy oat eaters (or adjust for your circumstances), in a crock pot combine:
    --4 cups organic old fashioned rolled oats
    --2 cans (4 cups) full fat organic coconut milk
    --4 cups water (optional:  substitute half a cup of the water measure with half a cup of butter or butter flavored coconut oil or regular coconut oil - extra yum!)
    --3/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
    --2-3 teaspoons cinnamon, or to taste
    --3 small or 2 large apples, cored and chopped (we prefer to leave the skins on)
    --1.5 cups raisins, optional (or add in the morning after cooked)

    I might stir just a bit to combine and distribute the seasonings. For large quantities like this, or starting very late in the evening, I use hot water and start the crock pot on high to get it up to a good, hot temperature to start. (I haven't found that necessary for smaller batches or earlier evening starts.) Just don't forget to turn it down to warm after about a half hour or hour! No need to stir again until just before serving in the morning.

    I think cooking the coconut milk, apples, and raisins makes the oats plenty sweet enough for me, though I see some folks adding sweeteners. In the morning, we typically put out these toppings for folks to choose from:
    --brown sugar, and/or honey, and/or maple syrup
    --shredded, unsweetened coconut
    --raisins
    --pumpkin seeds
    --sunflower seeds
    --chia seeds
    --flax seed meal
    --applesauce
    --whole milk, unsweetened yogurt
    --coconut or almond milk

    Paul and I eat leftover overnight oats cold out of the fridge as a snack - yum. Or I convert them to muffins or pancakes for workshop attendees.

    At the Rocket Oven Pizza Party, folks asked for the Switchel recipe. While I recommend reading through the links and the comments in the first page (this is page two of the thread) for more tips and info, here is the simple way I made the Switchel that was served.

    First, I use these handy, glass two-quart pitchers (whose square shapes are very friendly in a crowded refrigerator) Amazon link to Bistro Glass Pitcher.

    So, in the 2-quart pitcher, add:
  • one cup organic maple syrup (we get ours at Costco)
  • one cup organic apple cider vinegar
  • one healthy splash organic ginger juice - any were from a teaspoon or a tablespoon or so, or to taste (Amazon link)
  • fill rest of pitcher with water

  • That's it!

    I some times prefer honey instead of maple syrup, but then the Switchel would not be vegan friendly, and some times the honey is a bit more work to dissolve in the water, especially if the water is nice and cold. For a crowd, maple syrup is quicker!
    1 week ago
    More repairs - YAY! Photos from Chris McClellan aka Uncle Mud. Featuring Mud, Kirk Mobert aka Donkey, Fred, and David McGhee.















    I'm so excited about the new curated, clean and affordable wines at Thrive!



    If you want to look at the prices and offerings, and you sign up through this Thrive Market affiliate link, you get 25% off your first order and permies.com gets a $25 kickback!

    Btw, Thrive did have some growing pains at the beginning, which seem to have smoothed out. Paul and I order from Thrive every month, some times a few times per month, because they have the best prices on foods that fit our limited diet choices, including foods that are difficult to find elsewhere. Their shipping has gotten speedier as well.

     
    1 week ago
    From this reply in the Rocket Oven Pizza Party thread, we talked about two plants in our hugel berms. While these aren't photos from our place, they still show what's growing there.

    Jocelyn Campbell wrote:Thank you both, Matt and Pat - we sure enjoyed having you here and appreciate all your help setting up for the pizza!

    Ah, yes, we do have what some call red valerian, though I've always called it Jupiter's beard or Centranthus ruber (Wikipedia link here) in the hugel berms.

    (picture source)
    It's not a true valerian, which is an herb that most know for it's medicinal properties; so this plant, which today I learned is edible, does not share true valerian properties.

    The other (more prolific) red blossom in the hugel berms is from the "Ice Plant" Sedum spectabile - Boreau. (Plants For A Future link here).

    (picture from pfaf.org link)
    I knew this plant was a sedum and probably edible, but since the great folks in the tour identified it as such, I tried a leaf and was "meh" about the flavor and texture. The pollinators LOVE these blossoms and they can be covered in all kinds of insects in late summer. And this plant has survived several drought condition summers like a champ!



    Thank you both, Matt and Pat - we sure enjoyed having you here and appreciate all your help setting up for the pizza!

    Ah, yes, we do have what some call red valerian, though I've always called it Jupiter's beard or Centranthus ruber (Wikipedia link here) in the hugel berms.

    (picture source)
    It's not a true valerian, which is an herb that most know for it's medicinal properties; so this plant, which today I learned is edible, does not share true valerian properties.

    The other (more prolific) red blossom in the hugel berms is from the "Ice Plant" Sedum spectabile - Boreau. (Plants For A Future link here).

    (picture from pfaf.org link)
    I knew this plant was a sedum and probably edible, but since the great folks in the tour identified it as such, I tried a leaf and was "meh" about the flavor and texture. The pollinators LOVE these blossoms and they can be covered in all kinds of insects in late summer. And this plant has survived several drought condition summers like a champ!