Jocelyn Campbell

master steward
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since Nov 09, 2008
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Jocelyn's life is all about balance. Maybe that's why she's an accountant and is such an advocate for keeping our natural systems healthy.

As a child, she perched on branches, collected moss and fungus, caught frogs and snakes, and climbed up into swaying tree forts in her beloved Pacific Northwest woods. Then, as a teenager, she learned that reining in sugar kept her more alert and energetic. These youthful observations grew into passions for walks in the woods, gardening, herbal remedies, and natural parenting with whole and traditional foods. More recently, Jocelyn's interest in the natural and healthy led to all things permaculture and she completed her first permaculture design course in 2010.

Jocelyn enjoys helping 1- and 2- person micro-businesses spend less time on their bookkeeping, or putting on feast nights at wheaton labs (the permaculture community where she lives with her guy, Paul Wheaton), or helping achieve further world domination for the richsoil.com/permies.com empire.
Missoula, MT
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Recent posts by Jocelyn Campbell

Ah, the concentration to really take in a good poem has been lacking in my life. I keep thinking I'll get there again.

The thing is, I can't seem to simply / only read good poetry. It takes an engagement that is more comprehensive than mere vocabulary in my book.

Maybe being outside, away from domestic distractions makes that easier to do. Maybe that type of engagement would be more soul-filling than some distractions I employ these days to escape stress. What a great reminder for me to try!

When I do wish to plunge into the depths of poetry, I enjoy Mary Oliver or May Sarton.
3 days ago
art
Speaking of dogs, here's hoping my cousin's sign is effective!



4 days ago

Nicole Alderman wrote:It appears I'm outnumbered here. I live in probably the darkest green area on that map, and those are definitely potato bugs!


I'm from the green, Seattle area, too, and grew up calling them potato bugs!

I love these kinds of language/dialect idiosyncrasies and found it can be an issue with common plant names.

See my post about chenopodium album:

I did a Google search and found this, Lamb’s Quarters? Pigweed? Scientific Names, Please!.

In this picture from that blog post,



‘Chenopodium album’ is in hand, on the left (which we usually call lambsquarters, though some call it pigweed! or goosefoot) and  ‘Amaranthus retroflexus’ is on the right, (which we usually call pigweed around here).



I imagine a similar map could be made for where folks call Cheno. album lambsquarters, goosefoot, or pigweed!

When I was in junior high (think of the emotional/maturity context of that age), a friend lived in New Zealand for a while. When she returned, she told us she was laughed at for calling the dot at the end of  sentence a 'period' since that is a woman's cycle! There, if I recall, they just call them 'dots.' Though she had many chuckles herself over the kiwis calling pencil erasers 'rubbers!'

Oh, and biscuits in America are usually not sweet on their own. Not like the bickies in English-speaking places across the ocean. English biscuits are often what we call cookies, am I right?

I suppose it's more expected to have different meanings or names in different countries, so perhaps I digress. I think it IS surprising how distinctly different the linguistics are in different American regions!
5 days ago
On Tuesday we saw two moose near Cooper Cabin - wow! They were amazing to catch a fleeting glimpse of! Paul was surprised they ran off because they usually aren't bothered by mere cars and mere humans. They scoff at our puny-ness!

It was very near this photo of the road to Cooper Cabin that we saw them:



Though that picture is from December and we don't have quite as much snow around now, a few weeks later.

Since I DIDN'T get a photo of the moose, I will share this rather crappy/slightly boring video of the wild turkeys outside the Fisher Price House dining room window. On Christmas Day no less! Those windows are what we come times call "turkey TV."


When you receive a signed copy like this....


...it's rather awesome!!

Thanks David The Good!

5 days ago
A wonderful person sent Paul this book with a lovely note.

Change  Everything by Christian Felber (Amazon affiliate link)

THANK YOU!!
Hi Frank, I was thinking we had some threads for that already, and I found some! I thought about merging threads, but have left them each on their own for now. Maybe we'll merge some later.

your outdoor kitchen:  where, how.. - started six years ago!
Outdoor kitchen - an example of what Paul Abbott built five years ago
Outdoor kitchen - a thread started by Sally nine months ago who had similar questions to yours and cob oven questions, too
ROCKET CHUCK-WAGON - Outdoor Kitchen - amazing example that Steve Simons built

Paul has some video examples, too:





1 week ago

Chris Kott wrote:Hi Jocelyn.

The outer layer of Tesla's solar roofing tile is glass, isn't it? I hadn't thought about it that way, but that's genius.

If you take a look at Tesla's new solar roofing tile and start counting the possibility of stacking the functions of roof cladding, cleaner rain water capture, and power generation, you might be a Permie.

-CK



My thoughts, exactly! :-)
1 week ago
Enjoying the wildlife that comes with the eco system you're developing or looking forward to the box that comes with a gift - these are definitely permie things!

I was watching a video (not this one, but it's close) of Tesla's new solar roof tiles...



...and I thought, you know you're a permie when you are wondering about the rainwater collection opportunities* with a roof like this!

(*As in, would the runoff be cleaner, safer, less toxic than with other materials, such as composite roofing which leaches toxins into the water?)

(There is a thread to discuss the tiles here, tesla solar roof shingles, in our solar energy forum.)

1 week ago