nustada adatsun

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since Mar 05, 2013
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Recent posts by nustada adatsun

Bill Bianchi wrote:

Other than labels, do you disagree with this premise? Or, do you feel that using some of the wasted energy in the operation of a vehicle, like movement of the shock absorbers, braking, and heat from the exhaust, to produce hydrogen and feed it into the engine as a partial suppliment to the gasoline consumed will not reduce the amount of gasoline burned for each mile driven? In other words, would the addition of hydrogen somehow reduce or have no effect on MPG?



I don't disagree, I guess I assumed you were trying to state that the flaw of over unity water engines is where the hydrogen was produced.

However hydrogen gas burns very hot and very fast. I don't now enough about engines to know if that is a good thing or not. I would assume hat the slowest burn, that burns completely before the exhaust phase would be most efficient. But then again, I know next to nothing about gas engines.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIwEDoRhTf4

http://www.40fires.org/Wiki.jsp?page=Hydrogen%20Safety%20-%205.%20Gasoline%20Vs.%20Hydrogen
6 years ago
Installing solar is best when you are selling your house, as long as you get whatever permits you need. It will raise the value of your house dollar for dollar and you basically can pocket the subsidies. Just install an grid tie in with optional cutoff.
6 years ago
"

The biggest problem would be how to deal with 4,000 Amps of current trying to discharge all at once. esp if I am the one touching it after it is charge, yikes.



The current is still dependent on voltage and total circuit resistance\impedance. Battery internal resistance is also small enough that it often ignored when designing simple circuits.
6 years ago
@Bill Bianchi

It is irrelevant where the power came from, you cannot get positive useful energy in any closed system. And inputting energy is not actually anything new. Not to discount hydrogen gas as a fuel, but as with any fuel, it is just an energy storage mechanism, with different efficiency curves.

If truly "free" energy is to be found, I think we need to look at what happened at the big bang.
6 years ago

Aaron Harris wrote:I'm thinking of buying a property and building, but the average yearly property tax being something like $20 per $1000 is a daunting commitment.

I did a search for "Assessors" and "tax" and didn't really find anything relevant.

Does anyone have experience with how their earth berm, tiny house, wofati, or small quaint passive solar structure is assessed, relative to the average stick and siding job? Do assessors see this as a decrease in value, or an increase? and do they take into account the idea that it may cost almost nothing to heat year round? How do assessors view permie edges that may look like chaos to the uninitiated?

Thanks for any input.



As a rule of thumb, I would suggest looking at it like a lender would if you were to get a loan for your project, and document your costs so you can argue with something when they rape you. Assessors are globally and fundamentally incompetent and will pull arbitrary numbers out of their rear end. Usually on subjective comparisons of recently sold property. If they have nothing to compare a living structure to, they would probably compare it to a high end house of the same square footage, or a shed for a non-living area.

There is a fundamental problem with assessment, in that the only time anything has any monetary value is at the time it is bought and sold. Also value is different than price as price can change wildly depending on conditions of the transaction and value is subjective to whims of the individual. For example if a seller is willing to wait a year before selling, he is likely to get a higher price than someone who must sell the same property within a week. Or someone who is sentimentally connected to a property, may be less likely to take a low ball offer. Thus any number assessors come up with is arbitrary, speculative, biased and largely random.
6 years ago
I am new to brewing beer, but I add oats to increase the foamy head due to protein, maybe nuts would do the same thing. I can taste it now, pumpking hazlenut winter porter.
6 years ago
Thanks.

Because of the high temperature of roasting, I am suspecting at the moment that it might be close to charcoal, but obviously different because it has water slicking properties. I will have to look into how they get these numbers. I found a roaster who will give me some, but they are an hour away and only open during my busiest working hours, so it will be hard to get any in.
6 years ago

R Scott wrote:VERY similar to the first two pictures, but with a geodesic dome on top.

We also came up with a square design made from insulated shipping containers with a hoop house on top for a low-buck version, but not nearly as cool.

Greenhouses are exempt HERE as a farm building. YMMV



True, but where I live they would kick me out if it wasn't up to code. They won't let me live in a classic greenhouse.


I have also been looking at nanogel glass. But I can't find any costs to make an estimate. That probably puts it into the category "if you have to ask, you cant afford it".

http://www.advancedglazings.com/product-overview/solera-lumira-aerogel-r18/
6 years ago

Miles Flansburg wrote:I am wondering if placing cold manures on the ground in January is creating an icy insulative covering that will take longer to warm up just because of when it was put down and what it is made of ? Maybe just breaking it up, raking, hoeing, will make a difference?



The issue with insulation, is that it works in both directions resisting heating and cooling. So if you have long winters and insulate the ground, you may actually be keeping the ground cold for your growing season. But I suppose it would work if you have short winters. But if you had short winters, I suspect you probably would not be asking for solutions.
6 years ago

Guarren cito wrote:Do you know if the average has to be R30 or if every square foot has to be R30? I averaged the R value of 15 inches of spray foam and Low Emissions glass and it worked out to be about that. I dont remember exactly. It's probably different in every state.

The vacuum could be accomplished by the glass being Low E treated and double/triple paned. I hope it can work well enough!

I want to include a trellised living area/kitchen in the middle to protect us from the sun with grape vines, etc. Also shade from semi tropical dwarf fruit trees, etc.



It seems that vacuum insulated windows loose their vacuum only after a few years, in a geodesic dome you would have to find someone to make all the "odd' shapes which may be too expensive.

But a passive greenhouse would be able to use normal panes. Passive greenhouse

Sorry if I didn't state this clearly. When saying what I wanted to say, this forum wouldn't let me post saying it was spam. I guess "big" words are prohibited.
6 years ago