Eddie Johnson

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since Apr 18, 2013
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Recent posts by Eddie Johnson

That doesn't look like any hosta I've ever seen. I have a plant called Lords and Ladies that does well with Hostas. It has a similar flower (berry?) stalk. Mine are in bloom right now and the leaves are all gone & it's just the flower stalk. I'm in the South East U.S.
2 years ago
I have used comfrey to handle asthma attacks. I tear off a small portion of leaf no bigger than my finger tip and chew it up and swallow. I had read about it in a book somewhere and we had a comfrey plant so I gave it a try one day when I didn't have an inhaler handy. It did the trick so I never hesitated to turn to it again. I've not had any asthma symptoms in years  but I still keep some comfrey growing in the garden just in case.
2 years ago
It looks like Rose of Sharon to me
2 years ago
A few thoughts....
Last year I had the highest power bill I've ever had and it was between the heating and cooling seasons so it should have been lower than usual. When I called the power company to have them double check the meter, the representative told me it sounded to her like I had a water leak on a hot water line (causing the water heater to run continuously). She was 100% correct. It wasn't leaking enough for me to notice low water pressure, just enough to cause a huge bill.
The Dept. of Energy has a weatherization assistance program that is administered through regional organizations. Google weatherization program and your location to find the group closest to you. Get on their list.  If you're disabled and on a fixed income you will likely qualify. They do an energy audit on your home, insulate, repair furnaces, replace leaky windows, doors etc. It's free if you qualify and it can make a tremendous difference in your heating and cooling costs. Many cities offer programs that do renovations and repairs either through grant funding or through low interest forgivable loans (no repayment if you remain in the property a certain # of years).
If you have an electric dryer, vent it inside. You can buy a filter for the end of the hose or use a sock to catch lint that makes it past the lint trap. You'll get free heat and add a bit of humidity to the air as you do your laundry. You mentioned not using the oven much. Use it and when dinner is done leave the oven door open so the warm air vents to the room (don't leave the oven on). As others have mentioned, opening blinds/curtains during the day to let the sun warm things up helps. Make sure you close them when the sun sets or you'll lose heat. I'm assuming you do not have a fireplace. That's the best free heat around.
If you have a few extra dollars you can try space heaters. Kerosene heaters work if you can stand the odor. Don't use them when you sleep though. A couple of those electric radiators on the low wattage setting use less power than one on the high. So far, I've had the best luck with one of those edenpure style heaters. They blow air about as warm as a hairdryer but mine has had very little impact on my power bill and will keep the room it is located in quite warm. I live in a small house though. If you have huge rooms and really high ceilings, your experience may differ. That style is really safe and I leave mine on overnight and sometimes even when I'm not home. I've never done that with any other style of space heater. As my grandmother got older and more cold natured,  she bought an electric throw (electric blanket for covering up while on the sofa or chair) rather than raising the thermostat setting. I personally don't care for electric blankets b/c of EMF concerns and improper use (like piling other blankets on top) can cause fires.
Whatever route you take, I hope you find a cheaper way to stay warm

3 years ago
I'm not sure what the plant in the first pic is, other than a weed that grows in my yard too. The stuff climbing up the fence behind it is Virginia Creeper. The second pic looks like a wild blackberry to me.
7 years ago
Rain gardens are not ponds. They look like nicely landscaped beds. They are low areas where stormwater is diverted or caught naturally and planted with plants and shrubs (even trees) to filter pollutants and recharge the ground water supply. You will find a lot of info online that is really geared towards engineers and landscape architects that can overwhelm you with calculations and detail that you won't need. The following link is geared a little towards homeowners and also provides links to some of the more detailed info. http://www.catawbariverkeeper.org/issues/stormwater/rain-gardens
7 years ago
Growing up, my family had a neighbor who owned a small farm just outside of town where he had planted grapes. I don't recall the exact type that he planted(some wine variety I think) but I do recall him being really upset that they were cross pollinated with the wild grapes nearby. The wild grapes would have been muscadine or scuppernong.
7 years ago
Have you considered creating a rain garden in this area?
7 years ago