pal lane

+ Follow
since Jul 27, 2013
pal likes ...
forest garden homestead
Macal River, Cayo, Belize
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
0
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
6
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Pioneer Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by pal lane

A lot of good advice here, but what I see missing is the reason people begin to have joint problems in the first place, and that is lack of nutrients in the diet that build up bones, joints and tendons. Back in the good old days, people made soups from bones, and all that good cartilage and gelatin around the bones and feet made it into the diet. That doesn't happen much today, and usually takes special effort when it does. Also missing are the "slimy" vegetables like okra, nopales, christophene and a few others. Seeds like flax and chia also have that mucilaginous character when soaking.... this is very important nutritionally. Joint problems will heal if given the proper diet. Go to the butcher shop, buy a big bag of bones, and make bone broth!
5 years ago
I have several caves here, and at one time had planned to live in a huge rock shelter, open at both ends, but was denied permission by the Archaeology Department due to some prehistoric bones and stone tools found in one area of it. I've also considered one as a "bunker" shelter in case of CME or other radiation event needing long term protection, so have given it a lot of thought. The main problem here is the humidity... a dry climate might make it more comfortable to live in a cave, but a humid climate would not be pleasant to live in long term. Think dripping stalactites all over the ceiling. There is also the cold factor, 20 degrees or more below the ambient temperature, sharing with bats, the perpetual darkness and limited access. In the man-made caves those problems might be overcome easier, but natural caves don't have human comfort in mind as they are evolving. In some ways I think they are fragile as well, and would have major damage with any kind of earthquake or flooding, both possible in this geological area. It's the same with real estate wherever you go... location, location, location.
5 years ago
I have a lot of condensation on cooler walls, and use candles or lamps to keep the wall surface just warm enough to halt the condensation. If I had electricity, I would use light bulbs or some computer fans. It might be a good temporary solution and less expensive than running a dehumidifier while you ponder the big plans. Good luck with it!
5 years ago
A great idea for sure... although the Japanese have been doing it forever, too.... http://en.biwako-visitors.jp/reports/harie/?PHPSESSID=877fe1652075863ca151050e08e368e0 . There is also a youtube video that I've seen, but couldn't locate it at the moment.
5 years ago
I read one recently too... 'we become our memories.' I think they both refer to the universal law that "you are what you think." So if you don't like what your memories have turned you into, perhaps your imagination can turn it around by seeing beyond the memories, to the greater truth and higher potential we all instinctively know we have.
5 years ago
I read on a university web site that poultry was better after freezing, as it helps to break the cellular structure and tenderize it... very different from other meats. I've been doing that with better results ever since. My free-range roosters were very chewy!
5 years ago
Thank you for bringing this up... I've been wondering why everyone isn't freaking out about Fukushima.... too many other things to worry about?
5 years ago
I never waste a broody hen... I can always buy fertile eggs somewhere if I don't have my own, and why feed them if they're not doing something productive? You might have access to eggs from a variety of breeds, and do a mixed batch.

I need to store eggs for the moulting... here it's late fall. I've read about both oiling and waxing the shells to keep them fresh... will have to research a bit more. Wish I had a freezer to store them <sigh>.
5 years ago
I've raised a LOT of roosters in the past 2 years, and they don't fight if there are enough hens to go around, 10-12 each. They're too busy! If I were doing it, I'd get a young one that isn't quite "roostering" yet, and let them get acquainted without any competitiveness going on. The first rooster I bought killed the second... not outright, but he never fully recovered and later died. Fortunately the second had had enough time before that happened to father some beautiful sons, so I've been covered ever since. When your new rooster takes over the "duties," just make sure the old rooster has someplace he can escape to once the young one begins to get the upper hand. When I raise roosters from chicks and they fight, we eat the most aggressive ones and leave the nice ones for the hens.

I remove the chicks from the mothers as soon as they're dry and walking... if they stay with the hens for long, they don't do as well on their own... besides getting trampled on, they're always waiting for someone to tell them what to eat, and they're never as easy to handle when they get older. It allows the hens to start laying much quicker as well. Good luck... hope you don't get addicted to chicks like I am... they can be pretty time consuming (wasting).
5 years ago
I agree 100%! They have many skills and talents, and are so industrious that many would benefit from more exposure to them... but they shun the negative influence of the outsiders, and in some ways I don't blame them for feeling that way. I have some beautiful round back Shaker-style mahogany/cabbage bark chairs that I got them to make for me 20-some years ago, and have had untold equipment fixed by some of their world-class machinists. More than likely they will also be instrumental in the hydro system I'm planning to install when I get it figured out, too. If anyone has thoughts about that, please check out my post in the hydro forum.
5 years ago