Bill Crim

gardener
+ Follow
since Jan 31, 2014
Bill likes ...
cooking
Forum Moderator
Bill Crim currently moderates these forums:
Issaquah, WA
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
502
In last 30 days
68
Total given
88
Likes
Total received
525
Received in last 30 days
94
Total given
90
Given in last 30 days
30
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Pollinator Scavenger Hunt
expand Pioneer Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt Green check

Recent posts by Bill Crim

I had a glitch where the titles were saying "podcast 420 - stink - part2" I just fixed that.

It might appear in your podcast feed twice.  Opps!


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Credit: Eric Tolbert

Length: 53 minutes

Paul Wheaton and  Jocelyn Campbell continue their review of the movie Stink, a documentary by Jon Whelan, about chemicals and toxins that are in consumer products.

The movie points out there are approximately 80,000 chemicals that are in products we use and there is no regulation to  test to see if combinations of the chemicals are toxic. The FDA only relies on information provided to them by the manufacturers.

Jocelyn points out there is a false sense of security in America that this documentary attempts to dispel, that things being sold are being regulated and are safe. The filmmaker points out that the Toxic Substances Control Act actually allowed manufactures to avoid disclosing what chemicals are in manufactured products, in essence having exactly the exact opposite of the intended legislation.

The question was asked in the documentary how many chemicals are actually illegal out of the 80,000 currently used to in the US in manufacture of various products? The answer was actually only 10 in the US and 1,200 in Europe.  The movie points out the FEMA trailers deployed during hurricane Katrina that were making people ill were manufactured in China and used a lesser set of standards for the USA instead of the higher standards than required in China or Europe.  America seems to becoming a toxic dumping ground for all kinds of things because policies and regulations in the US are less stringent than in Europe and China.

Jocelyn discusses the ingredients in PAM cooking spray, including butane and propane, two things she is not interested in consuming.  Paul and Jocelyn discuss the "everything causes cancer now days" attitude that seems to prevail and how to Paul it seems that "just get the cancer and die" is what we are expected to get used to.

There is a segment in the move that Jocelyn and Paul find ironic and hypocritical. It appears that the Susan G. Komen cancer foundation was selling a perfume to raise funds to support breast cancer that was full of toxic chemicals. The justification for the perfume containing toxins was that selling it would raise lots of money for breast cancer research.

The movie discusses how California has passed legislation that requires more accurate labeling on products and Jocelyn points out that Coca Cola changed their formula so they would not have to change their label in California to reflect that some of their ingredients contained carcinogens.

Paul discusses the reduction of chemicals that they are attempting at Wheaton Labs. They require Organic or better food at the Lab and are working at producing more food themselves. Wheaton labs use natural cleaners and minimize any type of chemicals at the lab as much as possible.

Paul briefly discusses a earlier podcast where they reviewed the documentary Chemerical - Redefining Clean for a New Generation.  Paul's preferred cleaning methods are clean it up as soon as possible, try water first and hot water if that is not working well. Only use more powerful cleaners as a last resort and make sure they are as natural as possible. Jocelyn points out it really doesn't take longer or any more effort to use more natural cleaning products than it does to use chemical laden products.

The documentary points out ways to reduce toxins in your life, including making better personal choices and choosing companies that are more ethical and transparent in listing their ingredients. Jocelyn brings up the that children's toxic loads tend to be 5 times higher than adults because of their higher metabolisms, which is something the documentary does not really explore.

Paul overall finds the movie to be well done, powerful and easy to access. The bottom line for both is you can reduce toxins and chemicals in your life and you can slowly remove petroleum based products, including your "fire-based" clothing. Consider going Pool-Less (removing shampoos and soaps from your life).

Paul and Jocelyn wrap up the podcast with a discussion of local and cultural beauty standards.


Relevant Threads

Stink the Movie: https://stinkmovie.com/
Chemerical Podcast: https://permies.com/wiki/28744/Podcast-Review-Chemerical
Poo-Less Podcast: https://permies.com/wiki/22356/Podcast-Poo-Shampoo-Soap

Building a Better World in Your Backyard (Instead of Being Angry at Bad Guys): http://buildingabetterworldbook.com/
Paul Patreon for Podcasts: https://www.patreon.com/paulwheaton/posts
Paul Patreon for Video: https://www.patreon.com/pwvids/posts


Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:


Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
Kerry JustTooLazy
anonymous
Wade Luger
Jocelyn Campbell
havokeachday
thomas adams
Sasquatch
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
Dominic Crolius
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Seth Gregory
Bill Erickson
David Ingraham
Michelle Martin
G Cooper
Miroslav Ultrama
Matthew Johnson
Lisa Goodspeed
Dylan Butler
Kyle Neath
Penny McLoughlin
HL Tyler
Dana Martin
Keith Kuhnsman
Mark
Arturo Ceron
Eric Tolbert
Mehron Kugler
Sean Benedict
We have recently had a spate of people having problems where their Permies email messages are being flagged by their providers as spam or being sent right to the junk folder. We have had it happen also where the first email notification for a thread update will be flagged as spam, but a subsequent update from the SAME THREAD won't be flagged as spam. Many email providers have systems to report false-positive spam reports, or to register as a "bulk mail" sender. We just need to know when things get sent to the spam folder.

Its infuriating to debug this with just the staff, so would like to enlist you fine Permies to help us track down email spam issues!

Please check your spam folder and see if emails from permies are being marked as spam. If you notice a recent email that has been sent to spam, can you make a post below telling me what your email provider is (Gmail, Yahoo, comcast, etc is good enough) and what the title of the emails are. For example:

A Good Report wrote:
Comcast

[Permies] Message posted: Your donkey is silly!
[permies] Thank you for your quality post
[Permies] Message posted: If pork is the other white meat, what is the other red meat?



Thank you for the help in advance. Hopefully some extra data from you will help us figure out what is wrong, so we can fix it.



Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Credit: Eric Tolbert


Paul Wheaton and  Jocelyn Campbell review the movie Stink, a documentary by Jon Whelan, about chemicals and toxins that are in consumer products.

Paul and Jocelyn start the discussion from the historic Florence Building in Missoula, MT.  Before they actually begin reviewing  the movie Paul and Jocelyn mentions that he will be recording an upcoming podcast with some of his Patreon followers in the near future and give a "shout-out" to some current Patreon supporters.

Jocelyn starts out by pointing out that by the end of the documentary that Jon is advocating that people make better choices in their personal choices, that the manufacturers are more transparent in disclosing the ingredients and chemicals in their products and that the government also do a better job of protecting the public.  Jocelyn and Paul are surprised that the movie proves while people think the government must be testing and restricting things that are for sale to protect the public there really are no regulations restricting chemicals in products.

The documentary does focus primarily on what contributes to cancer because Jon's wife passed away at a young age after contracting breast cancer and passing away in 2009.  The movie points out statistically in 1960 one in twenty women would experience breast cancer and the current ratio is now one in eight.

The premise of the documentary is that after his wife, Heather, passed away and Jon because a single parent to his two young daughters gift giving was not one of Jon's strengths. Jon ordered pajamas online for a Christmas present for his daughters and when they opened the pajamas there was a strong chemical odor to them, in other words "they stunk". Jon then sets about to find out what chemicals have been applied to the pajamas.

Jon starts his attempt to determine what has been applied to the clothing by talking with the company and gets vague and unsatisfactory answers. Jon attempts a conversation with the Chinese manufacturer and ultimately ends up having the pajamas tested by a lab. The lab returns results that the flame retardant being applied had been banned 30 years before.

Paul relays information from the movie that flame retardant materials are in almost everything that is in our homes. Turns out in the 70's most home fires were caused by careless smoking. The government required big tobacco to make self-extinguishing cigarettes but people didn't like the taste so big tobacco pressured the government to change the law to make household items flame resistant instead of the cigarettes.

Jocelyn relates how the filmmaker researches the Cancer Act of 1971, the Consumer Product Safety Commission and how the government actually does not require manufactures to list any ingredients in products if they are lumped under the heading "Fragrance".

The documentary also highlights the case of a high school freshman who is highly allergic to ingredients in Axe body spray. The kid was hospitalized three times in a week from allergic reactions to people around him wearing Axe. The film also covers a reporter who had her blood tested for chemicals as an experiment and discovered that she had 175 chemicals linked to cancer, 210 linked to heart disease and 196 linked to birth defects currently in her blood. The documentary also discussed how infants were being born "pre-polluted" by chemicals they could only be exposed to through the blood of the mother.

Paul circles back to the teenager with the allergic reaction to Axe body spray and how when the parent contacted the company the company refused to disclose the chemicals in the Axe fragrance so they were unable to find out what was triggering the boy. The company insisted it was not their problem because they were complying with all Federal laws.

Paul and Jocelyn discuss in some depth how the movie covers the concept of fragrance, which by law does not have to disclose what components make up "fragrance". Jocelyn discusses how some women are starting to make their own make up so they can control the ingredients.

Paul and Jocelyn finish up the first segment of the podcast discussing "natural" beauty vs. societal pressure to use make up.

Relevant Threads

Florence Building Missoula: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Hotel_(Missoula,_Montana)
Stink the Movie: https://stinkmovie.com/

Building a Better World in Your Backyard (Instead of Being Angry at Bad Guys): http://buildingabetterworldbook.com/
Paul Patreon for Podcasts: https://www.patreon.com/paulwheaton/posts
Paul Patreon for Video: https://www.patreon.com/pwvids/posts


Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
Kerry JustTooLazy
anonymous
Wade Luger
Jocelyn Campbell
havokeachday
thomas adams
Sasquatch
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
Dominic Crolius
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Seth Gregory
Bill Erickson
David Ingraham
Michelle Martin
G Cooper
Miroslav Ultrama
Matthew Johnson
Lisa Goodspeed
Dylan Butler
Kyle Neath
Penny McLoughlin
HL Tyler
Dana Martin
Keith Kuhnsman
Mark
Arturo Ceron
Eric Tolbert
Mehron Kugler
Sean Benedict
Try finding some cheap burlap bags.

Small burlap bags with drawstring. These are $20 for 50 small bags. I am sure you could find bigger or smaller ones with a little googling.

This is also something where if you went to a wholesale dealer directly, you could probably get them in bulk radically cheaper. Most end-users don't need 100 burlap bags.
2 weeks ago



Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Credit: Eric Tolbert

Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop discuss Paul's attempt to bring PEX/PEP (Permaculture Experience according to X, where in the current example it is P for Paul) to life.

Paul is constantly amazed at the lack of interest and progress on the Rocket Mass Heater front. Paul is baffled that the world is not beating down the RMH "door" to improve and document the technology and companies are not springing up to build shippable cores.

Paul is concerned that people will not experience buy-in to the PEP concept until it is documented with pictures, videos and thousands of certified PEP participants.

Paul goes through a list of reasons why a PEP certification would be helpful:
  • There are many, many older people who own land that are desperately looking for younger people to will the land to in order to maintain the homestead and farm momentum.
  • Many younger people are looking for an alternative to traditional university education that costs an enormous amount of money.
  • People who want to shift their land to industrious people who are not qualified based on the standards of the land owner
  • People are looking to exit the "Rat Race" and find a deeper experience and meaning, and skills certification and instruction could help.
  • People are looking for certified and qualified Land Managers, speakers and instructors and need a way to measure the experience and competence of those individuals.
  • The system will need the ability to scale and the ability to ability to qualify the level of expertise the individual has


  • The program would be based on the concept you Crawl before you walk, Walk before you Run and Run before you Fly. There could be an online component for the more basic skills and instructor based training for the more advanced skills.

    A program of small, simple things you can do yourself, for example making a simple mallet. Paul can create a list of framework skills, starting small and working through a progression of more complex projects to build skills.

    Paul envisions courses PEP1 through PEP4. Each course would have levels of badges (tasks and projects) associated with the level. The more complex levels would take longer and the tasks would be more complex.
  • PEP1 is going to be a short course, probably about 2 weeks and require 16 Sand Badges.
  • PEP2 a formal program, probably supervised or actually taught by an instructor, that would take a summer or possibly spread out over evenings and weekends over a longer period of time and would consist of 1 Wood Badge, 7 Straw Badges and 14 Sand Badges.
  • PEP3 would be a formal program and take about 9 months. For example, growing and harvesting a million calories, which would feed one person for a year. This level would require 7 Wood Badges and 15 Straw Badges.
  • PEP4 would take about two years, Grow and harvest 4 million calories, naturally build a house and fill it with handmade furniture, etc. PEP4 certification would consist of 3 Iron Badges, 12 Wood Badges and 7 Straw Badges.


  • There are four badge levels with 22 aspects to each badge. Sand Badge (about 5 hours each), Straw Badge (about 40 hours each), Wood Badge (180 hours each) and Iron Badge (6 months each). Higher badge levels will be certifying lower levels and it will take at least three Iron Level instructors to certify an Iron Badge (Paul will probably be the one to certify the initial Iron Badge instructors).

    The first PEP1 event will be held at Wheaton Labs from May 20th thru June 1st in 2019. There will be a maximum of 12 students. The fee for the event for people who have never been to the Labs is the $100 Gapper fee. If you have ever been to the labs or participated in an event you will be able to sign up for this event for free. Pod People are welcome and even preferred as the initial participants.

    Paul goes on to discuss Badge Bits (seven Badge Bits that make up a Badge) and walks through an example using the Roundwood Framing badge, breaking down samples of the bits (tasks) and what it would take to complete each in order to gain the Badge.

    Paul ends up with a shout-out to his Patreon supporters and Bill Crim who has been working diligently to get the  podcasts out in a timely fashion.


    Relevant Threads


    Building a Better World in Your Backyard (Instead of Being Angry at Bad Guys): http://buildingabetterworldbook.com/
    Paul Patreon for Podcasts: https://www.patreon.com/paulwheaton/posts
    Paul Patreon for Video: https://www.patreon.com/pwvids/posts

    PEP Explanation: https://permies.com/t/96687/PEP-PEX
    PEP Forum: https://permies.com/f/178/

    PEP1 Certification Workshop: https://permies.com/wiki/98047/PEP-Certification-workshop-gathering-event
    Boot Camp starting Feb 2nd (two openings available): https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp

    Support the Empire

    Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

    To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



    This podcast was made possible thanks to:

    Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
    Bill Crim
    Kerry JustTooLazy
    anonymous
    Wade Luger
    Jocelyn Campbell
    havokeachday
    thomas adams
    Sasquatch
    Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
    Dominic Crolius
    Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
    Seth Gregory
    Bill Erickson
    David Ingraham
    Michelle Martin
    G Cooper
    Miroslav Ultrama
    Matthew Johnson
    Lisa Goodspeed
    Dylan Butler
    Kyle Neath
    Penny McLoughlin
    HL Tyler
    Dana Martin
    Keith Kuhnsman
    Mark
    Arturo Ceron
    Eric Tolbert
    Mehron Kugler
    Sean Benedict


    Listen Online
    Download

    Get all of the podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
    Subscribe on iTunes

    Summary

    Credit: Bill Crim

    This is part 2 of a podcast that was made from a YouTube live broadcast. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8zlsjGmi68

    Modern bee keepers will keep all of the queens that are hatched. Bad keepers will also sell queens from colonies that have hybridized with Africanized honey bees. They will also take all of the honey away from the bees, and feed them sugar water instead.

    There are several ways to keep bees strong. Let the bees eat more of their own honey. Plant lots of polyculture forage close to the hives. Keep hives 100 feet apart and off the ground. Let the bees control their own environment by reducing the amount of hive opening.

    Relevant Links

    Jacqueline Freeman

    Song of Increase, Podcast 395

    Vanishing of the Bees, Podcast 013



    Support the Empire

    Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

    To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



    This podcast was made possible thanks to:

    Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
    Bill Crim
    Kerry JustTooLazy
    anonymous
    Wade Luger
    Jocelyn Campbell
    havokeachday
    thomas adams
    Sasquatch
    Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
    Dominic Crolius
    Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
    Seth Gregory
    Bill Erickson
    David Ingraham
    Michelle Martin
    G Cooper
    Miroslav Ultrama
    Matthew Johnson
    Lisa Goodspeed
    Dylan  Butler
    Kyle Neath
    Penny McLoughlin
    HL Tyler
    Dana Martin
    Keith Kuhnsman
    Mark
    Arturo Ceron
    Eric Tolbert
    Mehron Kugler
    Sean Benedict


    Listen Online
    Download

    Get all of the podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
    Subscribe on iTunes

    Summary

    Credit: Bill Crim

    This is part 1 of a podcast that was made from a YouTube live broadcast. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8zlsjGmi68
    Paul and Shawn talk about honey bee care as an example of quality animal care. The complex problems of Colony Collapse Disorder have many causes. Raising bees in a way that is more aligned with their natural tendencies will keep them stress-free and healthy.

    Paul and Shawn would like feedback on this chapter in the podcast forum post. Jacqueline Freeman has also reviewed this chapter and many of her suggestions were incorporated.
    Continued in Part 2.

    Relevant Links

    Jacqueline Freeman

    Song of Increase, Podcast 395

    Vanishing of the Bees, Podcast 013



    Support the Empire

    Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

    To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



    This podcast was made possible thanks to:

    Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
    Bill Crim
    Kerry JustTooLazy
    anonymous
    Wade Luger
    Jocelyn Campbell
    havokeachday
    thomas adams
    Sasquatch
    Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
    Dominic Crolius
    Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
    Seth Gregory
    Bill Erickson
    David Ingraham
    Michelle Martin
    G Cooper
    Miroslav Ultrama
    Matthew Johnson
    Lisa Goodspeed
    Dylan  Butler
    Kyle Neath
    Penny McLoughlin
    HL Tyler
    Dana Martin
    Keith Kuhnsman
    Mark
    Arturo Ceron
    Eric Tolbert
    Mehron Kugler
    Sean Benedict
    As I understand it, many plants can only absorb chelated calcium. (Calcium that has been bound with amino acids or proteins.) So I think your calcium needs to go through bacteria or fungi regardless of your method. So I don't think that a high degree of processing like making bone char is really needed. Bone char is OK too, it might just not be worth the effort if you don't specifically need bone char distillates or the bone char itself for some specific purpose.

    Like Bryan was saying, You just need to cook the protein or fat off. The bones themselves don't need further processing to be useful. It might easier to just use a basic recipe for bone stock(broth). Make bone stock by simmering(just below a boil) the bones with a bit of vinegar for 8-12 hours in a stock pot or crock pot. You just need enough cooking to get all the fat and protein off the bones. The vinegar helps break up the collagen(boiling collagen with an acid makes gelatin) and helps demineralize the bones.  If you don't need much broth(or you have a lot of bones) you can feed the broth to pigs, chickens, or pets mixed with their food. The bones still retain most of their minerals, but they start to get crumbly. I make bone stock a lot, and the resulting bones really don't have much smell once they have dried off.

    Once you have gotten the meat and fat off the bones, just break/grind them as coarse or as fine as you want. If you don't have an immediate need for calcium in the soil, there should be nothing really wrong with just using coarse chips. They would be broken down in the dirt directly instead of in the compost pile.
    1 month ago
    I think I found my issue. I updated the post, but it probably takes some time for it to be requeried by iTunes. So hopefully it will be up in an hour or two.