Cris Fellows

pollinator
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since Apr 01, 2014
Cris likes ...
forest garden urban bike
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Biography
Wife, mother of 3 awesome and eclectic grown boys, grandmother. Pediatric ER suture nurse. Urban Food Forest tinkerer. Herbal medicine maker and learner. "Together is our favorite place to be" at UnAbandoned Gardens.
www.unabandonedherbals.com
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Recent posts by Cris Fellows

The stitches look like knitting.  It could be accomplished using technique similar to that used when making raglan sleeves for a sweater,  only not done in the round as shown.  If you expand the pictures,  you can see the characteristic nested loops of knitting.
5 days ago
So many ambitions.
1. Leave a living legacy.  My garden and my children (including daughters in law and grands).  
2. Develop a relationship with the land and plants.
3. Collaborate with said plants and make healthy people.  Currently we (My daughter in law and i) run a small herbal business.   We enjoy crafting herbal products, and especially thinking through the process to create individualized preparations.
4. Collaborate with our community in making our world a beautiful place.
1 month ago
We too have urban rocks.  I mostly use them as edging for beds.  They work nicely and after plants grow in they aren't even ugly.   😂
1 month ago

Jay Angler wrote:Some sort of sunchoke dish?



Are there actual recipes with sunchokes???
1 month ago
Our experience with comfrey:
I have a lovely bed of Russian bocking, almost straight gravel (on top at least there was a driveway right beside it) and full sun.  It does well and we use it to chop and drop and occasionally for medicine.  I later was gifted a comfrey plant and placed it under the newish apple tree...I did not realize it was the standard variety.... and I chopped some and threw it in the compost pile.  
The Russian has pretty much stayed put from what I can tell.   The standard is trying to take over the world.   I don't really mind that it has spread under the tree but compost row I am going to try to reclaim this year.  
Both varieties have a purplish blue flower.  The leaves are slightly different,  and side by side I could probably identify them,  but not it in the wild.
Unless you are digging or plowing your beds,  i would highly recommend Russian bocking.  In my experience,  I would never recommend standard comfrey (pictured).
2 months ago

Maieshe Ljin wrote:

Cris Fellows wrote:

My husband was tricked into eating- " Indian turnip", not sure if that is what it is actually called,  but it had a delay then turned his mouth into a blast furnace.

Weeds I enjoy: chickweed,  yarrow,  nettle,  lamb's quarters.

Growing a huge patch but have yet to try Japanese vegetable Fuki. (Pictured behind the tripod trellis frames)



I’m interested to hear about Fuki. What inspired you to grow them and how has the process been? Are you waiting for them to mature like rhubarb? There are some scattered but impressive of European butterbur growing by our river in the gravel bars and stream banks (biggest leaves I had ever seen!) and I’m considering trying to prepare them in the same way. It sounds as if they shouldn’t be significantly less edible.



I was trying out several perennial vegetables.   All of the other (I don't even recall what I planted) rooted cuttings/ seedlings that I put in that fall dematerialised.  I planted one Fuki.  It has taken over the little plot under the black locust.   It is beautiful.   Related to coltsfoot, it looks just like the fall coltsfoot leaf, but the flower is alien looking in the spring and nothing like coltsfoot.  The difference in the leaves is Fuki is HUGE!  I haven't tried it because the few recipes I found involve fussy double cooking.  I want to try this year.   Regardless,  between Fuki and Jerusalem artichoke,  my apocalypse garden is full.
2 months ago
Before I became a nurse I worked at several fancy restaurants and country clubs.  
Alligator- Cajun style,  just tested like Cajun
Sweetbreads- thymus gland,  looks like brains... couldn't get past that
Pork tenderloin-basically rare,  as long as it is up to temp it is safe,  but really pink pork scared me a bit.

My husband was tricked into eating- " Indian turnip", not sure if that is what it is actually called,  but it had a delay then turned his mouth into a blast furnace.

Weeds I enjoy: chickweed,  yarrow,  nettle,  lamb's quarters.

Growing a huge patch but have yet to try Japanese vegetable Fuki. (Pictured behind the tripod trellis frames)
2 months ago
Judson, yay!  You're the best.   ♥
2 months ago
Much of this is an echo of what had been said above.   But I will add my two cents.   Ginger is quite astringent and warming.   Cutting up a 1 inch knob and steeping for 15 minutes,  adding lemon and raw honey and optionally a pinch of cayenne is great for sore boggy throats.  Elderberry is great IMO as daily immune support but needs to be hit hot and heavy as soon as you are aware you are sick... like a T every hour or two while awake.   We have a tincture blend with elderberry,  reishi and echinacea for this purpose as well.  Rest, hydration and movement are all important.   Getting outside and getting fresh air perhaps equally so.   Vitamin D, optimally with added vitamin K seems essential during these short days, adding zinc if you are not feeling well.   And,  during the viral onslaught of 2020, we used Sweet Annie (artemesia annua) with excellent effect in the whole family.
Well, I'm going to give it a go!  I will let you know in the fall if we have had success!
3 months ago