Win a bunch of tools from Truly Garden and Loma Creek! this week in the Gear forum!

Tim Clauson

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since Aug 10, 2014
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Recent posts by Tim Clauson

Mike Haych wrote:GEORGIA JET

Short season variety. They store really well if properly cured. We've tried other varieties but none yielded like Georgia Jet so that's all that we grow now. Price $2.00 per slip plus postage. Payment is by Paypal or Interac.

We've been growing this variety for 4 years so they're well adjusted to a growing season of ~ 120 frost free days. They are virus free so far.

What area are you in Mike?

Kyrt Ryder wrote:I'll have to look him up, thanks for the tip.

Sure hope he's still in good health, he was already 77 when that article was written in 2004.


Same here. We were at his house 3 years ago and he was going strong at that time \
4 years ago

Kyrt Ryder wrote:So I'm looking for cultivars which do well here. Typically that means the earliest ripening cultivars I can get my hands on. [I'm doing the same with apples and plums but that's because I want those fruits to ripen during our limited solar dehydrating season, rather than out of necessity to ripen the fruit.] Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.



Look up "Nick Botner" in (I think) Yoncalla, Oregon. We met Nick at his ranch a few years ago when we drove the 1/2 hour to his nursery to buy some apple trees from him. He has FAR more than just apple trees! He grows a lot of various fruit trees and other cultivars there in Oregon and has been doing this for many, many years in his private nursery. While we were there, he showed us a couple of older PawPaw trees in his yard and gave us a couple of young PawPaw trees and had several varieties of Persimmon trees that did well there in the PNW. He is very knowledgeable on what trees do well there and what doesn't.
http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/one-mans-apple-orchard-zmaz04fmzsel.aspx
4 years ago

David Sharp wrote:Parbuckling was the term I was looking for, but if others know it by other names throw them out there, and thank you for the responses.


I've learned a new term. I've never heard it called that before. Thanks!

David Sharp wrote:Ok, it's not really an emergency but it's driving me nuts. I know there is a term for the method of pulling logs up an inclined plane (ramp) using ropes. I CAN'T REMEMBER IT. It's driving me bonkers. I believe I saw it here on Permies.com but can't find it, and I googled it and found thousands of references to the technique but didn't find the term. I am a long time reader but have never posted before. I absolutely love this site and the people here. So, I guess I'm no longer a lurker. "Hello my name is David, and I'm a Permie"


We always called it "cross hauling" or "crosshaul". Not sure if that is what you are looking for.

Adam Chisholm wrote:

Is there a chance you could do a basic sketch of the toilet with the diverter itself? What I see in the pictures all make sense.



Sure Tim, I'll see what I can sketch up quick after work today as well as our other option we're considering instead of the very expensive SunMar. If I wind up building a large scale chambered unit similar to the SunMar, I'll use the same urine diversion I built for the bucket system in the woods. We've considered the cinderblock chamber like you mentioned, but it's not as feasible on our location. I like the idea of longer time between clean outs too. Hopefully I'll have something posted this afternoon.


Thanks Adam! I really appreciate it. Sounds like we are both on the same page for the end result. The sketch would be great! No hurry though

Thanks,

Tim
4 years ago

Wyatt Barnes wrote:I dream of building in an area with no building code. Not going to happen, the nanny state is here to stay. I do hope to take some of the petty stupidity out of our local code gradually. I should have started 20 years ago. In the jurisdiction next to us you can't have more than three buildings on a lot without a minor variance. ( at $500 +) A women I know had a house, a shed and a gazebo on her property. Before she could get a building permit for a garage she had to agree to remove one of the other buildings after the garage was finished.


I hear you there. That sounds like the kind of foolishness you would find in Oregon. It is so refreshing to be in an area that is still somewhat reasonable. But it will chance soon enough. I have no doubt.
4 years ago

Adam Chisholm wrote:First off, Tim I just clicked over to your YouTube channel and I love what you guys are doing. Great job doing life together as a family.

We are a family of six starting a homestead on 16.5 acres in Central Kentucky. We are also planning on using a composting toilet. I think that we will eventually use a SunMar unit (maybe) or a similar design (we're permitting our timber-frame and straw bale house, so we've got to work with inspectors who won't issue a certificate of occupancy with just the humanure bucket system. But, right now we use a simple bucket system when we are camping on our property. I'm a teacher (for now) so we have summers off to work on our land, so this is our only toilet when we live in the camper for two months, and it works fine. I'm attaching a few pictures of what we have now, and I'll describe the rest and try to post some pics again later when I can get through the snow-pack to our place. These pics are in our summer bathhouse which has a loo on one side and a shower on the other. This is the bucket loo in the bath-house before we put the skin on. The water is gravity fed from rain catchment up slope, there is a homemade urine diversion unit underneath that seat which separates our solids from the liquids. The urine diverter is flushed by the sink water, and it simply empties into a mulch pit down grade at the base of a big cedar tree. The solids are then composted. Here's closer look at the toilet itself when it was just surrounded by a tarp on a clothesline in the woods. The wood is just scrap that I salvaged. The top piece had a big map painted on it. (sorry no inside photos, but I can arrange that if you like). The two black pipe elbows you can see are air intakes that allow air into the chamber, and what you can't see is the tall black chimney that rises out the back to vent air out. Not as important in the woods, but I'm experimenting for the future. That "tank" on the back of the toilet is for our carbon (sawdust, coffee hulls, shredded barley straw, etc.) We put in a scoop each time we poop and and it works to break down when the bucket is emptied into the compost bin. Right now ours only gets seasonal use by the family. I hope this helps. Good luck on the homestead.



Thanks Adam! 16.5 acres would be really nice. Where we live there is no permit nor even a building department. We couldn't get a permit if we wanted one! Coming from Oregon that is so odd to me. You couldn't do anything in Oregon without a permit. Is there a chance you could do a basic sketch of the toilet with the diverter itself? What I see in the pictures all make sense. When we bought our place here (10 acres) it already had a good conventional septic, well and electric pole on the property. That was really nice even though we hope to go off grid when we can afford to slowly change over. For now, the electric is convenient. We don't use the outdoor shower in the winter here of course, but will likely set it up again in warmer weather. For now, the strong winds destroyed the temporary one we set up when we first started staying here (camping). I would love to timber frame a house, but we have no timber here so that's out Since we haven't a permit requirement here we are thinking on building a composting toilet system, but I think one more as I described above rather than a bucket system (which would work quite well). I think with 7 people, a bucket system would get pretty tiresome pretty quickly. All of these posts are giving me more and more of the pieces I need to figure out the right system for our place. A commercial system would be nice, but at this point would cost more than our whole house

Thanks,

Tim
4 years ago

Wyatt Barnes wrote:These houses people want removed, could you charge 75 percent of what an excavator demolition with trucking away and tipping fees would be? Not sure how things are done in your area.



I have to look into that. Not sure how it works here either. Good thought.

Thanks!
4 years ago

Wyatt Barnes wrote:Ethical demolition. One that reuses or repurposes the materials. I think its time has returned, I don't think it was unusual 30 years ago but has gone out of fashion.



So true!
4 years ago