Patricia Boley

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since Aug 26, 2014
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bike chicken dog
Rittman, OH
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Recent posts by Patricia Boley

Jean-Paul Calderone wrote:

Patricia Boley wrote:There are laws in the state of Ohio about how you store eggs if you plan to sell them retail.  Small egg handlers (less than 500 hens) are required to refrigerate at a temperature around 4 degrees F.  I sell eggs at the farmer's market during the summer (no real requirements) and keep them in a cooler with ice packs, since they've already been refrigerated. Whatever I don't sell at the marker and during winter months I sell them retail at a local co-op.  As far as cleanliness of eggs, the chicken eggs are usually pretty clean, unless it's been a rainy day.  I spot clean with water.  Duck eggs are usually filthy as they are indiscriminate as to where they lay. Again, a brief soaking in warm water and a scrubby pad occasionally.



Are you sure it was 4 degrees F?  That sounds like freezing, not refrigerating.  I've had eggs go solid in much warmer temperatures than that.  Perhaps 4 degrees C?



Sorry, I work in a lab and everything is metric. The correct temp is 45 degrees F.  I doubled checked on the website.
3 weeks ago
There are laws in the state of Ohio about how you store eggs if you plan to sell them retail.  Small egg handlers (less than 500 hens) are required to refrigerate at a temperature around 4 degrees F.  I sell eggs at the farmer's market during the summer (no real requirements) and keep them in a cooler with ice packs, since they've already been refrigerated. Whatever I don't sell at the marker and during winter months I sell them retail at a local co-op.  As far as cleanliness of eggs, the chicken eggs are usually pretty clean, unless it's been a rainy day.  I spot clean with water.  Duck eggs are usually filthy as they are indiscriminate as to where they lay. Again, a brief soaking in warm water and a scrubby pad occasionally.
3 weeks ago

Ryan M Miller wrote:Does anybody have an idea what insect this is?



It looks a little like an antlion.  Honestly, when I don't know, I email someone at entomology department since I work on campus.

https://www.insectidentification.org/insects-by-state.asp?thisState=Ohio

This is a helpful web site.
2 months ago
I saw this a few years ago and still watch it occasionally. While spoofing prescription drug commercials, I find it rings true.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bf5TgVRGND4
4 months ago

Carla Burke wrote:Yes, please!?! And, thank you!




Recipe for Rhubarb wine is as follows:

Makes about 4.5 gallons

13.5 lbs rhubarb
1 apple
6 lbs of sugar
Juice of one lemon

Stew rhubarb and apple in a large stock pot for about 20 minutes. Add about 4 lbs of sugar and mixed in during stewing. Leave in the pot overnight or until cool enough to strain. Strain into a 5 or 6-gallon carboy and add enough filtered water to make 4.5 gallons.  If you want to make 5 gallons just use more rhubarb. That is all that was available last year.  Take Brix reading. It should be around 16. If not use more sugar dissolved in warm water. I ended up using 6 lbs for 13.5 lbs rhubarb. The mixture will be very foamy, so taking the reading may be problematic. Add lemon juice. I waited another day to pitch yeast (ec1118 champagne yeast) Fermentation should commence in about 8 hours. Leave in the carboy for a minimum of 4 weeks. Your final Brix reading before bottling should be 2-4. Bottle and be patient! I usually wait until Thanksgiving to open a bottle.

I keep a log of everything I brew so I can refer back to it.
4 months ago
Rhubarb wine is very delicious. I set some aside and distilled it into Brandy. Also very tasty. I'm happy to share the recipe if someone wants it.
4 months ago
I can't seem to grow fava beans well, here in Ohio. I had great success in Northern CA, but the last two seasons, the favas will grow, flower and fruit but during the summer get attacked by aphids (?). I have tried spraying with soapy water, neem oil, capsaicin/garlic concoction to no avail. They just wither and die from the attack. Last year I tried companion planting marigolds. That didn't seem to help either.

I also had a vole problem last year. They ate all the cucumbers and melons they could get to, ate all the broccoli seedlings and chewed on the beetroot sticking out of the ground. I put out mouse traps with peanut butter and grains and only caught one sparrow. :{ The traps got too rusty to work after a while. I am trellising most of that stuff this year. The melons are Sakata sweet and they are so delicious. I only got a few!

My lovely red Russian kale was attacked by cabbage moth last year, too. I took off all the affected leaves and drowned them or gave them to the chickens. My Brussel sprouts were also infested. I need to keep a better eye on it this year. The kale recovered nicely and gave me a few more crops at the end of the year.

Also, every ear of corn had at least one worm last year.
This will be my third growing season on my farm.  I had several volunteer tomatoes near my back deck that must have been from the previous owner. I didn't recognize the variety and there wasn't anything remarkable about them. I used them for sauce and the chickens found them and wiped them out quick. Last year, a different variety came up in the same spot. They were yellow with pink bottoms. I researched and think they were Marizol Gold. Other than the color, they were not special.  I also had cantaloupe growing among the potatoes. Must have been seeds in the compost because I have never planted it. They weren't very tasty, either. Chickens!  I had some other squash volunteers in my compost heaps. They were delicata. I let them flourish. One ground cherry volunteer also came up where I had planted them the previous year.  I hope to see more of that this season.  I usually let volunteers do their thing unless they are interfering with something I planted.  My Calendula, Borage and Dill were planted once and have been coming up on their own. As my garden matures I hope to see more volunteers!
6 months ago
Pancakes, pitas and other flatbreads. I don't think it is a good idea to purchase a starter. You should cultivate your own with the yeasts in your area. I tried a San Francisco starter in Ohio a few years ago and it didn't work that well.
6 months ago
This is truly chilling. My lab recently learned that there is a pig virus circulating that can also infect and sicken commercial poultry. We want to screen poultry farms in the state to see if the chickens or turkeys have it circulating in their bloodstreams. My boss is afraid that none of the farms in this state will allow us to test their flocks because they don't want to be identified as infected. We will have to get archived serum from some other researcher.
6 months ago