Juli Anne

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since Oct 14, 2014
I grew up on a little farm in southeast Idaho. My parents homeschooled myself and six siblings and none of us turned out socially retarded! I love to garden, spin, knit, milk goats, and eat good food!
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Recent posts by Juli Anne

raven ranson wrote:Wow!  $140 a pound for a raw fleece?!  Fantastic.  She says she grows the fleeces to over 12 inches long with no vegetation in it, to get that price.

Great video.

The coats are really interesting.  Even more interesting is that she doesn't coat the ones she wants to grow the extra long wool.  

Mostly I just love the dogs.  When I get enough sheep, I want a pair of dogs like that.  


Interesting what a hot dry area she's in.  Many of the fine wool breeds like merino come from hot, dry places like (in the case of merino) Spain.  I wonder if her climate is part of what makes the wool so fine?



I have spun her fiber quite a bit and the long fleeces are definitely not fine like merino, what they are is lustrous kind of like angora (mohair). One of the best parts of her fleece is that those wools pick up color in such an amazing way. I do make wearable yarns out of her fiber but definitely not something shaped like sock or gloves! Mostly it is just amazing to play with and stare at...I make embroidered landscapes out of the wool by tacking down the wool in different shapes to represent trees and people and it is the simplest form of embroidery...and I sell the for a lot of money so it isn't just about the artsy fartsy part of me. Her Scrap Boxes are just a great way to get introduced to different luxury fibers in amazing colors. Yes, I do have a pretty powerful girl crush on her and her processes!
1 year ago
I have three good batches of nettles that I have carefully tended and I think this year I will be playing with them as a fiber source. I understand soaking is the way to rot away the non-textile part and just leave the fibers?
1 year ago
I went and visited Natalie Redding in Southern California and that is how she makes her living, raising longwool sheep and teaching others how to dye, spin, and which wools to use for the best outcome. She has been my wool guru for years and pretty much taught me how to dye and even to delve into the world of art yarn rather than just worsted and woolen. Here is the video I made while I was at her place.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Humk8xMr6PI
1 year ago
I have a very small plot of 1.67 acres in cold southeastern Idaho and sheep have been a gamechanger. I buy a bum lamb and raise it on my goats so that I don't have to bottle feed and I can raise two or three easily on one goat for meat in the Fall. If I put them on bottles I sell them for $80 apiece once I see they are healthy and can hand them to someone less experienced. 4-H lambs they are called here. I keep one ewe to raise her own babies and she is the only sheep that I shear. Her wool keeps me in spinning and knitting wool for the year. I do put some items on my etsy store and was making $250 for a two layer hand dyed, hand spun, hand knit hat. I receive much more for a sweater but all of these products are very time consuming and I only make a few of them a year for special requests. The wool is the least valuable part of the sheep to me as far as money goes. I do also love that sheep graze on rough ground so well...we started with dead pastures but when the sheep rotate grazing with the goats they are lush without an overabundance of any one plant.
1 year ago
Hi, I am in a zone 3-4. We are in alkaline soil in southeast Idaho. My favorite living fence plants are riverbank willows and cottonwoods. It sounds like you want something with a painful component as well and I think you are on the right track with the wild roses and black locust for sure. I think the biggest pain in keeping a living fence going is the grooming you do twice a year. If you are using prickly plants it becomes hard to get yourself to go in and tend to it. I would maybe start with a small food hedge to get some practice before starting on the pricklies? It is sometimes hard to get the bottom of the hedge to fill in completely because all of the small branches are growing at the top of the tree or shrub, not at the bottom. To fix this plant very thickly...but then you can't do as much shaping. It is an interesting hobby and really the only way to figure it out for your property is to just jump in and try multiple methods all at the same time and see which you like best. Here is a link to my video talking about living fence.
1 year ago
Welcome to permies. Can't wait to read your book. Juli
2 years ago
I so agree Jocelyn.  I love to spend time alone with little touches here and there with the people I love. I am happiest when researching or building my farm. As far as help from community I find offering payment in money or bartering best so that if I am having a low energy time I don't owe others help unexpectedly.
2 years ago
We had nothing but cobblestones and an icky orange moss on our pastures when we moved to our homestead. I read 'One Straw Revolution' and decided to  figure out how to fix my pastures with mulching...but I had no mulch except the nasty pesticide and herbicide filled straw in our area. I bought a really nice scythe and cut or weeds down several times a year, leaving them in place. By the second year our pasture was growing grass and by the third year our invasive weeds were gone. This is the video showing my process with the scythe:  
2 years ago
I learned about growing your own soil after Paul suggested 'One Straw Revolution', I developed my own twist on this for our area and in two years I created topsoil on top of cobblestones by cutting down the weeds with my scythe and leaving them in place. Here is the think to my latest video on the subject:  
These are from the greenhouse and the backyard. Used strawbale beds and it took a lot of rabbit manure to 'neutralize' the pesticides and herbicides in the bales...but eventually they take off.
2 years ago
art