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Bobby Wynn

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since Oct 14, 2014
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Recent posts by Bobby Wynn

Thanks, Mike and Al; welder is from Michigan so that might explain it-I was thinking in F* and didn't ask. 1200-1300 F did seem a little low. I've seen stove and pipe get red hot in wood stoves and knew that structural damage can occur by repeated overheating, hence my original questions. I THINK that the temp of iron/steel can be gauged by it's appearance(color) and that's how blacksmiths do it. I am going to a renaissance fair tomorrow where they have blacksmithing and glassblowing demonstrations, so I'll be asking questions. Let you know what they say. Got to run.
5 years ago
THanks Al will definitely read the book and check out dragonheaters. If there are any doubts about flu liners, I'll build riser out of firebrick. Have only got dry stacked "J" at this point to see how things will lay out. I live in Western North Carolina and would be very interested to know if there is anyone in this area with a functioning RMH willing to let me have a peek at it. Thanks again!
5 years ago
First many thanks for your speedy replies. Have had about 30 years experience burning wood in the conventional way (started splitting wood behind my grandfather's woodworking shop at 6 or 7 yrs of age) ; and so my initial response to a RMH design on the screen was " that's not going to work, there's WAY to much horizontal run in proportion to the rise" (and etc , etc ) However, understanding the theory and principles involved, and that, apparently , the things actually work, this would be the greatest advancement in wood heat in a long time. And so I have already started to build one since seeing this 5 days ago. This led to my next concern that the top of a common 55 gal drum, at those temperatures, would soon burn out. I saw a utoob vid where they used sand between two pipes to construct the riser. While this would provide excellent insulation, these pipes would burn out too, leaving you with a pile of sand for a riser. In order to resolve these issues, I plan to make the outside(vertical) part of the barrel of masonry and cap it with a round heavy steel plate. This would allow for some quick heat and allow the "lid" to be lifted for inspection,cleaning, or repair, should it be needed. I've been told by a welder that the melting temp of steel is about 1200-1300 degrees, which conflicts with some of the estimated temperatures I've been seeing online, hence my questions. I also discovered that a piece of 6" chimney flu liner, sold at masonry supply, fits nicely inside a piece of 8" flu liner giving a 2" thick column with an ID of 6" and OD of 10" which should work nicely for the riser. Again thanks for being there. I'm really stoked (!?) about RMH's and have interested friends.
5 years ago
Hi can someone tell me where the hottest part of the burn is in a RMH and what temperatures to expect there ?
5 years ago
Hi can anyone tell me where to get a hand powered pump for a deep well already in place? Well is 6" dia and abt 300 ft deep but water starts at abt 70 ft. Would like to be able to get water if power goes out.
5 years ago