Nigel Wickenden

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since Dec 18, 2014
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Recent posts by Nigel Wickenden

D Graves wrote: Graciously, all were willing to share their efforts. Thank you Cam Wilson, Christian Shearer, and the local presenters from Stanthorpe who are happy to further share their specialties.

I've just started to learn about permaculture and this will be a great help. Thank you.

I will be doing a PDC up in Scotland in May so will use what I learn to get a head start on the course.
6 years ago

Charli Wilson wrote:*waves* I'm in the UK too, Derbyshire in the East Midlands.

I'll be in the White Peak area April 17th to 19th assessing two teams doing their expeditions for the Duke of Edinburgh Award.

Nigel.
6 years ago

Katy Whitby-last wrote:Is the course up at Tap o Noth?

Yes. May 19th to 31st. Quite a long trek from Spalding but the timing was convenient.

Nigel.
6 years ago

Michael Cox wrote:I suggest you add your location and climate details to your profile so it appear on the left when you post - it makes it much easier to spot each other!

What zone would I be in on the edge of The Wash?

Nigel.
6 years ago
I live in the fenlands of south Lincolnshire where it is very flat. We usually get mild winters and mild summers. Rainfall is a bit over 20" per year but the water table is quite near the surface because we're at or just below sea level. In winter if the wind comes from the East it can get well below freezing. The coldest I've experienced here is -19C or -2F but that really is unusual.

We have a small plot both front and rear of the bungalow. The front being on the North side and the rear being overshadowed by trees from the property ver the fence. We do get good light on the back wall of the building. We have paths all the way round close to the walls so as to clean the windows & doors with two patios by the back door and patio door.

I am also constrained by the fact that my wife wants to see a lot of flowers from the kitchen window and the garden seat under it. We also have a covered garden swing at the southwest corner of the back garden and she wants flowers around that too. The flower beds are against the back fence with lawn between them and the patios/path.

My immediate thoughts are to make a herb spiral near the kitchen door and garden seat under the kitchen window. Next I would turn the lawn into her flower bed and try to hide a few food plants in there. The empty flower beds would then receive perennial food plants with a couple of dwarfed fruit trees. One of the Hardy Kiwis will go up that warm back wall and the other against our East fence that faces West. As to the front garden, I will try and get it all to perennials with flowers close to the drive, bedroom windows and front door.

I'll save the real planning until after I have done the design course which finishes May 31st. It is up near Aberdeen at http://pri-tap.com/

6 years ago
I'm just starting to learn about permaculture and will be doing a 12 day design course in May. I understand that different parts of the world will have different "best value" plants and this is why I thought I'd try starting a thread for people in the UK and Eire to exchange information and ideas. Obviously I'm hoping I'm not the only person from the British Isles here.

My garden is laid out traditionally at present with lawns and flower beds. I was getting a bit fed up with it last year and put three apple trees and a plum on dwarfing root stock in the front lawn. Then I made a bed by a fence and added raspberries, blackberries, strawberries and currants.

We've already got a couple of bamboo plants so stakes are covered and I'v just bought two Hardy Kiwis, a Black Mulberry and a New Zealand Flax. Next item on the agenda is some Comfrey. Once I have done the design course I shall start looking at perennial veg to plant too. One thing I thought of is fertility and years ago I found spent mushroom compost to be excellent, so I think I'll invest in some and then cover with wet cardboard/newspapers to kill off the grass and stuff I don't want.

I would really appreciate any advice that seasoned permaculturalists can offer to somebody living on a dead flat land at sea level in the East Midlands.

Nigel.
6 years ago