Grant Holle

+ Follow
since Jul 05, 2015
Utah
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
2
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
18
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
20
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Grant Holle

I like the idea of a scythe to replace my trimmer. It occurs to me it could also be used to clear sagebrush (with a brush blade, natch). Anybody have experience scything sagebrush?
1 month ago
About 15 years ago our NPR station reported on a study about how a good community library reduces petty crime. Basically,  if teenagers have a welcoming library to go to after school, they're less bored. The library in downtown SLC, which was just finishing when the radio did the report, is great, really more of a community center than just a library. So many wonderful events are held there on any given day.
7 months ago

Len Ovens wrote:

Grant Holle wrote:Didn't know where to put this idea, and this thread seems as good as any.

Would it be possible to take Walker's half barrel design and turn it into a pit roast alternative?

Here's what I imagine: the half barrel stratification chamber has a hinged door at the end so you can put in your meat to be roasted; the barrel is covered 8"-10" in cob and then insulated well (something like the easy-bake coffin only with plenty of mass in addition to insulation); the door at the end would then have to be covered in mass as well (could be as easy as berming earth against it). You'd of course  have thermometers in both the meat and the chamber. I'd imagine that you could heat up the mass in about 4-6 hours and the mass would stay sufficiently hot to cook the meat for twenty-plus hours. You'd start the fire around 8 pm the night before, keep it stoked until midnight, and feast the next day at around 6:00 pm. If the inside cooled too much during the night, you could always start a new fire in the morning for an hour or two.

I thought about this after watching some friends pit-roast some pork last spring. It was labor intensive digging the hole, building the bonfire, stoking the fire every couple hours during the night, and digging out the meat the next evening. Plus we used a massive amount of wood.

Most of the labor for this project would be on the front end--building the rmh, but that would be reusable. Aside from that, it's just a matter of berming and unberming the door and lighting and feeding the fire. Feeding the fire would actually be pleasant because you'd get nice warmth radiating  from the bell over the riser--the fire-feeder's seat would probably be the most popular. And it would use far less wood than a pit-fire.

Any problems with this design?



Most accurate answer is "please test this and let us know how it works"  

I think in this case I would want to use a whole barrel to allow for enough room for food as well as flue gas. The larger size would also allow easier ingress/egress. I assume it is ok that the food is slightly smoked. Assuming the door is on one end, it may be ok for that end just to be insulated well rather than piling dirt there. Mass and insulation on top of the barrel should be more than under and side. (under and side may be ok with mass only, but top might want insulation)

tilt the barrel slightly down towards the door as the bottom may collect water from your cooking and the flue gas as it will take longer for the mass around the chamber to warm up if it is warming up the food mass as well.

if it doesn't work you at least have a nice outdoor heated bench to sit on in the fall... if it does work you can cook in it and still have a nice outdoor warm bench in the fall.

Having played with stratification chamber flue gas heat extraction chambers like this, I personally feel these are much better than the long, long, long and bendy pipe solution. More heat is extracted with less flow resistance.

cook me some traditional Pumpernickel  (cooked overnight in a cooling bread oven, but this might work too.).




Len.

I really appreciate your advice and design modifications. I'm a newbie at this stuff--I've got one partially built, poorly thought out rocket stove under my belt. Right now, I'm concentrating on learning the science. I've read Ianto's book, and I'm presently reading Erica and Ernie's (great stuff), as well as watching Paul's and Matt's videos (also great). In short, I'm encouraged you don't think my idea is ridiculous.

As I've heard Paul, Erica and Ernie advise, my first real rmh project will be outdoors. With your modifications, maybe this roaster will be my first project. As you suggest, worst case scenario it doesn't work as roaster and I just use it as a butt warmer.

Thanks!
8 months ago
Didn't know where to put this idea, and this thread seems as good as any.

Would it be possible to take Walker's half barrel design and turn it into a pit roast alternative?

Here's what I imagine: the half barrel stratification chamber has a hinged door at the end so you can put in your meat to be roasted; the barrel is covered 8"-10" in cob and then insulated well (something like the easy-bake coffin only with plenty of mass in addition to insulation); the door at the end would then have to be covered in mass as well (could be as easy as berming earth against it). You'd of course  have thermometers in both the meat and the chamber. I'd imagine that you could heat up the mass in about 4-6 hours and the mass would stay sufficiently hot to cook the meat for twenty-plus hours. You'd start the fire around 8 pm the night before, keep it stoked until midnight, and feast the next day at around 6:00 pm. If the inside cooled too much during the night, you could always start a new fire in the morning for an hour or two.

I thought about this after watching some friends pit-roast some pork last spring. It was labor intensive digging the hole, building the bonfire, stoking the fire every couple hours during the night, and digging out the meat the next evening. Plus we used a massive amount of wood.

Most of the labor for this project would be on the front end--building the rmh, but that would be reusable. Aside from that, it's just a matter of berming and unberming the door and lighting and feeding the fire. Feeding the fire would actually be pleasant because you'd get nice warmth radiating  from the bell over the riser--the fire-feeder's seat would probably be the most popular. And it would use far less wood than a pit-fire.

Any problems with this design?
8 months ago
When I learned Hungarian, my primer was an old communist era textbook. It contained one example of a joke. Here it is (translated):

A farmer calls up the ministry of agriculture. "What's wrong with my chickens? When I went to check on them this morning they were lying on the ground not moving." The clerk from the ministry answers, "I'll tell you what's wrong with them. They're dead."
1 year ago
I wear a straw hat to keep the sun off my neck, face, and bald spot; I like a good straw cowboy hat. It's dry and sunny wear I work in the summer, and I try to keep my skin covered if I'm working all day, so I like long-sleeve shirts and pants (plus the pants protect my legs from abrasion). I teach at a university fall through spring, so my professional clothes are mostly khakis and cotton dress shirts. Once they're too worn for teaching, I use them for working outside in the summer. I find khakis are lighter and looser than jeans, and cotton dress shirts are cooler than t-shirts. Sure they wear out quickly, but then I just throw them out (saves doing laundry).
A friend was running in one of the canyons near Salt Lake City some years ago. He had his two dogs with him, one of them strong and fast, one of them partially lame from a birth defect. They came upon a moose up in the trees. The fast dog ran and barked at it. Of course, the moose charged, but the fast dog got away leaving her lame (and innocent) sister in harm's way. The moose came down on the lame dog's back with its front legs, then sauntered away. With the moose safely away, my friend ran to his dog thinking it was dead for sure. His dog popped back up and shook herself off, totally unharmed. Apparently, moose can pull their punches.

I've heard stories of grizzlies doing similar things to people--basically saying, "I could kill you but just don't feel like it today"--but this is the only one I've heard of from a moose.
1 year ago
I have to give a nod to the good old American cowboy hat. I wear felt in colder weather (a second-hand Stetson) and straw in hot weather. Cowboy hats keep the sun out of your face and off your neck, and when it rains they channel the water away from you (just tilt your head forward occasionally to drain it). Quality matters, and I've found it's essential to get one that fits. If it fits correctly, the wind shouldn't take it, even without a stampede cord (where I come from only dudes wear stampede cords).

Admittedly, I feel like a poseur wearing a cowboy hat, seeing as how I hardly ever ride a horse and wasn't raised ranching. I'm old enough now not to care. It's such a practical hat.
1 year ago

Roberto pokachinni wrote:HI Joseph:  

It's the wind chill that gets me during winter biking. I wear multiple layers of gloves and still feel cold.

 The thing about gloves is that there is a compromise between insulation and dexterity.  In order to have dexterity, you must have a certain level of tightness, and that compromises insulation; even with high quality gloves.  With layers, one especially has to have tightness to have the dexterity.  The link to the hand covers that I gave in one of my previous posts shows something very different.  These go on your bars and  allow you to have the lighter gloves with dexterity inside the insulated and very shielding cover.  Although these are pricey, a guy of your talents could fashion something similar for a minimum cost.    



I've seen diy versions using plastic milk bottles.
1 year ago
My advice: get out and do it. I find my imagination is worse than reality. It's never as bad as I think it'll be.
1 year ago