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Jesse Fister

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since Dec 02, 2015
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forest garden hunting chicken
Missoula, MT
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Recent posts by Jesse Fister

Why not use as mulch? You can also get a paper log maker press which makes good fireplace kindling out of it: https://us.amazon.com/Northern-Tool-Equipment-09001007-Paper/dp/B00GTP5UQE. Or use as packing material for shipping.

Jesse
2 months ago
Hi there. Welcome to Permies. I have a three bedroom one bath unit coming up for rent here as soon as this week for about your price range. It’s on a 6 acre homestead a little outside of town and I make the daily commute for work. We practice permaculture and will be doing lots of gardening this season. I am also in grad school. Call me at 4o6-239- 8O2eight.
2 months ago
Ha! Kai, I'd pay you to live here!
3 months ago
Hello,

I will be renting out my 3 bed 1 bath single-level house on a six-acre homestead soon. Asking $1350, all utilities included. All appliances except dishwasher. Twelve-month lease. 25 minutes from Missoula. Fireplace. Barn. Icelandic chickens. Animals considered. I will be living in the attached studio. Require good references. Seeking solid, reliable, respectable, and ethical tenants.

I recently finished my PDC through Geoff Lawton's online course. I have attached the property design which I hope to work on this summer. Any permies interested?



Jesse
4 months ago
Hello,

My wife and I own six acres in Huson, MT, about 25 minutes west of Missoula.  We'd love some help on our property!

We're on our third summer out here with fruit trees planted.  We have lots of yarrow, ducks, arrowleaf balsamroot, pine, dandelions, chokecherries, sage, thyme, parsley and much more.  We also have Icelandic chickens, ducks, goats, alpaca.  We also have raised hugelkulture beds and mushroom logs growing.  We're open to your ideas and may need help, especially as I enter graduate school during the next four years.

Please send me a PM with your skills, interests, a bit about yourself, a picture, and three references.

Here's an old blog I don't post to anymore, that will show you at least what our place is like: http://sixmilehomestead.com/

Thanks!

Jesse
2 years ago
Angela,

We have six acres in Huson, MT, about 25 minutes west of Missoula, MT.  We're on our third summer out here with fruit trees planted.  We have lots of yarrow, ducks, arrowleaf balsamroot, pine, dandelions, chokecherries, sage, thyme, parsley and much more.  We also have chickens, ducks, goats, alpaca.  My wife and I would love to have you out and meet you.  Send me a PM and come visit!

Jesse
2 years ago
I wish I knew someone with a yeoman's plow.  There are affordable tractor subsoiler attachments, however.
2 years ago
Hey, Permies,

Interested in following this article to learn to make compost tea, but kinda wanna go bigger. I'm thinking of those 275 gallon totes. Any recommendations on the conversion of what we would need for pump size, etc?  Robust pump recommendations?  Any foreseen issues?

http://www.finegardening.com/article/brewing-compost-tea

Jesse
2 years ago
Hello,

We live in Montana and recently did a simple soil test.  It returned:

pH: 7.3 (alkaline)
Nitrogen: depleted
Phosphorus: sufficient
Potassium: surplus
We have heavy clay soil.
Growing Zone: 5b

We have several large hugel beds for vegetables and rotational grazing fields over several acres.  Alpacas (and all camelids) cannot eat high-nitrogen plants or they get sick, so no clover cropping the fields.  

How would you heal this?

I see that urine, diluted, provides a good 10:1:4 NPK ratio as fertilizer but with our high potassium I'm nervous.  I think I read that potassium keeps plants from accessing nutrients in the soil.

Recommendations?
2 years ago
Here's what we do.

Pluck it.  Gut it.  Make sure to get the Gizzard from the front.  We cook the organ meat that night and freeze the feet for stocks later.

Then we take our odd little bags of spices collected from throughout the year and mix them in a bucket of water to brine the Turkey overnight.  Then we smoke it.

We eat the dark meat for several meals and then turn the rest into smoked turkey rice soup.  Yum!
2 years ago