Jan White

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since Dec 17, 2015
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BC Interior, Zone 6-7
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Recent posts by Jan White

Jesse Ray wrote:

Jan White wrote:You've got a wide range of materials in your beds, probably lots of fungi and microbes, so this might not be an issue for you, but those ferns you're using look like bracken.  Bracken has ptaquiloside which has allelopathic effects on other plants.  It's a very tough plant.  The ptaquiloside is released from rhizomes, stems, and leaves as they break down.  Three years in, there are still some plants that just will not grow in our soil where bracken was cleared - mostly root crops and ornamental bulbs.  Fruiting plants like tomatoes and squash were fine right from the start.  Our irises struggled on pathetically and this year started to look okay.  Our soil is extremely poor to begin with, so you may not have any problems.  I'd go easy with it though :)




Oh dang... well I didn’t put a ton... only about an inch or two layer underneath the maple leaves. Hopefully the chicken compost and worms I’ll be adding can help to them break down into something more inert. 🤞🏻



Yeah, I underestimated their effects and used them as mulch EVERYWHERE the first year here :(  Just couldn't pass up that much biomass.

You're putting a tonne of good stuff in your beds, so I bet it will be okay.  Maybe wait a year or two to see how it goes before adding more, though.
3 days ago
You've got a wide range of materials in your beds, probably lots of fungi and microbes, so this might not be an issue for you, but those ferns you're using look like bracken.  Bracken has ptaquiloside which has allelopathic effects on other plants.  It's a very tough plant.  The ptaquiloside is released from rhizomes, stems, and leaves as they break down.  Three years in, there are still some plants that just will not grow in our soil where bracken was cleared - mostly root crops and ornamental bulbs.  Fruiting plants like tomatoes and squash were fine right from the start.  Our irises struggled on pathetically and this year started to look okay.  Our soil is extremely poor to begin with, so you may not have any problems.  I'd go easy with it though :)
3 days ago

Pearl Sutton wrote:Good  topic Ms Lucrecia!
I am not comfortable with dogs, not familiar enough. I worked for a vet for a while, but was the cat tech, I am half cat, as far as anyone can tell, and cats know it and I am REALLY good with them. I will end up with a dog at some point, was talking to a friend, he recommended this book/system of dog training  HelpYourDog.com Ever heard of this? Is it worth looking up, since I'll be raising and training a dog on my own? I need to raise it from very little so I learn dog things too. Things like I'm not good with playing with a dog, as I'm never sure of what is play and when they are pissed off, etc. If I learn how a puppy plays, I'll understand more of how an adult plays.
Is this book etc a good resource?

I'll need a dog for security and animal assistance and guarding. I'm watching already (though I don't have space/time for a dog yet) for a mom dog I really like, to watch for her puppies. Of the dogs I meet, I like maybe 20% of them, and would have no problems taking in maybe 2% of them. Most dogs just aren't my thing, I'm a cat person. If I could keep a Bengal Tiger for security and goat herding I would :) Can't see that working well though!! So a dog it will be :)



Maybe old school, but I really like the Monks of New Skete.  This book of theirs and The Art of Raising a Puppy are the two that I own.  I grew up interacting with dogs in a way that really fits with their methods, so everything in their books was easy for me to apply.  I like that they don't rely on treats for training and that they use body language, vocal cues, and, if necessary, physical domination that imitate what dogs do themselves.
3 days ago

William Allendorf wrote:

I guess Grandpa was into freelance non-standard faggotry



Best laugh of the day!
Would leaves + plywood not just smother the grass anyway?
5 days ago
My parents have two big walnuts in their front yard. Most years the leaves don't get raked until late next spring. The lawn is fine. My mum's flower beds never get cleared of the leaves and they, too, are fine. The shade from the trees seems to be more of a limiting factor than anything else.

In case anyone thinks she's planting special juglone resistant plants...
English ivy
hostas
bleeding heart
Daylilies
lilacs
periwinkle

I know there's some other stuff in there but I can't picture it right now.
5 days ago
My husband has a habit of twisting his sleeve a bit when he leans his arm on something so the elbows don't wear out as quickly. He also airs his clothing out instead of washing it most of the time. I manage to get something on my clothing within ten minutes of putting it on it seems like, so I wash my stuff a lot more. His clothes are way nicer than mine.
5 days ago
Good suggestion, Sonja, if anyone else tries those crackers. I actually don't remember if I ever tried parchment or not. I used it for other things so always had t on hand, but who knows! Definitely worth a try.
5 days ago
Alice Friedeman's book Crunch! is awesome.  Her website has the basic cracker recipe (and lots of others) on it, and you can tweak it however you want, but the book has some good ideas.

Our favourite version was pretty close to the basic cracker, but with chickpea flour instead of wheat.  For seeds, mostly sesame, some flax.  Lots of black pepper.  I'd fill up a gallon jar with these every week or so  - back when we had an oven. Sigh.

The only thing with her crackers is you need a silicon baking sheet.  I really don't like using silicon baking stuff, but her crackers are so tasty and quick and easy, that I made my peace with it.

The basic Alice cracker

300° F    30 minutes total baking time, scoring after 10 minutes

2/3 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 Teaspoon salt
1/4 Teaspoon black pepper
1 Tablespoon black sesame seeds  (or flax, poppy, white sesame, or chia seeds)
3/4  cup water

Instructions

Preheat oven to 300° F.  Mix dry ingredients very well, add water and mix well.  Then immediately pour watery battery onto silicone mat, tilting pan, and using spatula to spread.
Bake for 10 minutes.
Remove from oven, score batter with spatula  or fluted pastry cutter
Return to 300° oven and bake another 20 minutes.
After 20 minutes, turn oven off, and wait 30 minutes before removing pan from oven.
Check to see if crackers done; done crackers will not be moist, soft, or bend.
If crackers are not done, reset the oven to 250°, put the crackers back in the oven and after 5 minutes, turn the oven off, waiting 30 more minutes before opening it and taking the crackers out to see if they are now done.

5 days ago
I like rye as a winter grain.  It will grow just fine in very poor soil. I planted a bed quite late this year, in November. After a couple weeks of below freezing it warmed up a bit and all the rye is coming up already. It's my most reliable crop at our new place.