Anthony Saber

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since Jun 01, 2017
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Noosa Hinterland QLD, Australia
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Recent posts by Anthony Saber

I am toying with the idea of improving the quality of the water I use for irrigation. There seems to be some evidence that
it can improve yield and improve soil structure.

Looking at the three possibilities –

1) Aerating the water source by simply pushing air and oxidating the water.
Need to see what the current  dissolved oxygen is at present and then increase the oxygen level
To see if this will have any effect.

2) Magnetised water. Running the water through a pipe encased with magnets.

3) Dose the water with Hydrogen Peroxide. Need to know the dose needed and the method of delivery.

From what I have researched so far there does seem to be a benefit of the above three methods.

I would like feedback if anyone has done this and their findings.

I will most probably be doing some simple trials with each and doing some mix and match of the three.

My logic is for a minimal expense, if the yield and the soil improve it’s a no-brainer.

Cheers
Anthony
2 years ago
Hi Lesley,

The procedure is, you take a soil - compost sample and examine it under a microscope 40X to 400X where you can see
bacteria, protozoa, fungal hyphae, nematodes and arthropods.

I have been doing this for years but now would like to measure a before and after to see if the soil food web is improving in the soil.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eG5eQroUSGo

Cheers
Anthony
2 years ago
Need help finding the procedure on how to analyze the microbial life count in a soil sample.

It seems Elaine Ingham's course provides the information but I am not prepared to pay the high price for the course
for finding out basic information and I believe the information is already out there.

Interesting that persons who have done the course are unwilling to share information.

Anyway, if anyone can steer me in the right direction it would be appreciated.

Cheers
Anthony

2 years ago
Hi Steve,
You will find Johnston Su info here - https://www.csuchico.edu/regenerativeagriculture/bioreactor/
or do a search on youtube.

In my opinion it makes compost at another level but you do need patience. 6 to 9 months.
2 years ago

Rufaro Makamure wrote:I did some thinking on what could be more beneficial profit wise, either buying seedlings ready for transplanting or nursing my own and l ended up chosing to nurse my own. The advantages of buying seedlings would have been l would be guaranteed of an available plant to put in the ground and in the present moment i.e (giving me some lead time advantage). But nursing my own seeds, though it will cost me a little bit of time which in my position does not have that much significance, and is risky in terms of having something to plant, if done right it might get me around double the amount of seedlings that I would get if l were to buy seedlings instead. So l divided l will change most things that l feel affected our first nusery. I am nursing the seedlings myself at home and l am using dug out kitchen compost we dug last year ( it transformed into beautiful soil). I think if I give the nursery enough attention we might win.

I am now aware of things that l never even used to consider or think about. When l opened the onion seeds packet l couldn't help but laugh to myself. The amount of seed was almost about 2 tablespoons at most or even something just over 1 spoon. Now that l know there is not much that goes in making onion seeds, l honestly think humans are their own monsters. The process of making the packet and probably packing could be what's making things so expensive and those are the two things we can find our way around. It now seems so many things considered normal and important are a joke and life could be so much simpler if we ourselves uncomplicated our ways.



Why Seed Saving is so Important.

A grower's first, priority is to be able to have seed for the next two seasons.

Let me explain how the Seed Industry works –

The seed company gets either other growers or themselves to grow a crop for the sole purpose of obtaining seed to sell.

Once the seed is harvested it is sorted-sieved by the largest down to the smallest seed.

The large seeds go back to the seed growers and the next size down goes the larger buyers.

What remains is all the small seeds that ends up in seed packets and are sold to gardeners.

So from the start as a gardener/ small grower, you are at a disadvantage as you have inferior seed.

How to fix this problem, Is to save your own seed.

When you are growing a crop try and identify the best-strongest plants and leave them to go to seed, this will become the seed for next year's crop.

The advantages are that you have seeds that have adapted to your growing conditions and next year's seed will be free if stored correctly.
Let seed dry completely and keep seeds in a glass jar with a secure lid. Mark the date and year on the jar and keep them in a cool spot or refrigerator.

In practice, if done year after year and choosing the best seed from your current crop,  your seed will improve year on year.

Cheers
Anthony

2 years ago
Hi Rufaro,

Have you heard about the 3 sisters plantings that was used by the North American  Indians. It consisted of growing corn, beans and a pumpkin/squash. You start with the corn and when its up about 2 feet you can plant three beans at the base of the corn and a small type pumpkin/squash in between the  corn. The corn acts as a stake for the beans and the pumpkin/squash provides a ground cover to keep in the soil moisture in the ground. Three crops in the same space as one, and each one giving and getting something it needs from each other. A true monoculture in one bed.  You could try sweet potato for the ground cover as the young leaves are edible.

Cheers
Anthony

2 years ago

Rufaro Makamure wrote:Selling of the green mealies is going great. We decided not to go to the market with the mealies and we have been reaching out to people in the neighborhood and it's working perfectly. We have been going with the maize to the customers, and now some know that we are selling and they are now coming to the plot.

From this test we are glad because we can still maintain a very low carbon footprint from growing the maize up to when it gets to the customers' plate. We have not used any form of transport other than a wheelbarrow and our muscles so there was no fuel to burn, the maize grew from grass and a little bit of compost as any form of feed to the soil eliminating our contribution to greenhouse gases that could have been as a result of the application of artificial/human made fertilizers (minute contribution but worth it). We had no pests to worry about at all this time. Then there was no packaging, we get back our bags as we deliver. So it's an achievement worth celebrating.



Hi Rufaro,

The Mealie / Corn looks great keep up the good work. Remember to keep the biggest cobs for next years seed.

By the way a lot of people have never seen or eaten white corn, all they know is sweet corn.  When ever I have a BBQ - Braai I make
up some pap and sauce to go with the meat.  Standard fare in the bottom part of Africa.

Cheers
Anthony
2 years ago
Hi There,

If you want a cheap alternative, just use rock dust from any quarry, its dead cheap and great for the soil.

If you can access rock dust from various quarries all the better as there is normally a different make up the minerals.

Cheers
Anthony

3 years ago
Hi Roger,

I would recommend a soil test using the Albrecht methodology. Not all soil tests are the same.

This test works on telling you what the present minerals are in the soil and then balances the ratios of so-called
idea soil.  In this way, you are not guessing and know exactly your starting point and the way forward to improving the soil
to enable you to grow nutrient-dense produce.

Once you have the results you should get a soil prescription of what minerals are needed, which you should apply and start
your soil regime by feeding the soil with organic matter and biological life.

There are a lot of cheap and effective preparations that can be utilised to improve any soil.

By the way, I do this type of soil test and advise on how to improve the soil by organic means. Message me if you are interested.

Be warned, to do this correctly you need patience and perseverance. The results are so satisfying and rewarding for your soul and health.

Cheers
Anthony








Hi Rufaro,

Not sure if cow pea leaves are so called normal food in Zim. You may need to educate the locals by making up a pot and giving them a tasting. If they like it they will buy it, if not it may be a crop not to grow in the future. I believe it could also be feed to life stock. Ignore all  negative comments you hear and just get on with producing food.

Cheers
Anthony
3 years ago