Jordan Harder

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since Jan 07, 2017
I'm in the beginning stages of starting my homestead /small farm. So most all aspects of horticulture and building ideas are of interest to me, as well as alternative transportation. Cheers to you all! I'm loving this sharing space.
Cocolalla ID
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Recent posts by Jordan Harder

Hey things are going well, thanks! I've been gone working in Alaska most of the summer, so progress has been slower. I got my road in this spring though. And I'll be putting in a well and pond when I get home in a few weeks. I have some seedlings and grafted fruit trees that I got started in my dad's fenced orchard, but I probably won't transplant them till next spring. Building  out a little school bus home too ha
1 year ago

Though not a groundcover or interplanting candidate, vetiver grass can handle the pH and can provide a close by, perennial and very valuable source of chop and drop mulch/compost material. Its columnar root system won't compete with the blueberries, and it can provide a host of other benefits depending on your situation. Might be good edging for uphill on contour water infiltration?

Why is the vetiver grass not a candidate for a ground cover? Too much competition for nutrients?
2 years ago
I have similar plans for next year, so really appreciate all of your input in this thread. I need to do a soil test, but feel the spot will grow them well. It is a meadow close to the water table, downhill from pine and cedar woods. Keen for more ideas for preparatory green manures and cover crops. Thanks!
2 years ago
Very cool tho see what you guys are doing! I like the combination of tecniques. Excited to see more progress of the project.
2 years ago
Hi Brandon, very cool to hear!
The job scene can be a bit more difficult here, but at the same time there are quite a variety of industries for such a small town. I work as a carpenter on a small crew, 2-4 guys. We've been plenty busy this year and I expect this summer to be quite busy around here. There are quite a few job postings here on Craigslist right now. You won't be likely to earn the wages you might be used to in Seattle, but you won't pay Seattle rent or be driving in traffic.
I'd be happy to help you if I can be of assistance. And I would be happy to talk to you about dreams and possible collaboration as well.

-Jordan
2 years ago
Hi my name's Jordan, I'm 25 and I am starting a farmstead. I am definitely keen on the eco village/communal living thing, and would like to team up with some other folks however that comes about.

Here's a little about my situation and lifestyle:

A recently purchased 10.5 acres 12 miles south of Sandpoint and 30 miles north of Couer d'alene Idaho. I think it's very lovely. My projects when the snow melts include finishing my driveway, fencing, planting some trees (chestnuts, walnuts, hazels, apples, pears. . .), and building a shop with a living space and a good project space that can double as overflow living space. And if I can find time, I'm planning a dirt jump line on one side of the property. I love riding bikes and don't feel like I'm outgrowing my enjoyment of being in the air.

I also love skiing, mountain biking, rock climbing, sailing, and chilling out with slacklining and hacky sack. This is a really sweet area to do these things.

I love music and am just getting back into playing the banjo a little.

I want to practice permaculture, or I think that's the best term to describe what I envision. I'm not big into the guilt thing as a motivator though.

Shoot me a moosage or whatever if you might be interested or would like to talk.

Cheers!
-Jordan

2 years ago
Hey Shaun and Olivia I think I have similar visions as you guys. I'm 25, working doing carpentry and getting going on a farmstead when the snow melts. I just bought 10.5 acres that I really like here in the fall. I'm definitely open to teaming up. I'm located 12 miles south of sandpoint idaho in the north panhandle.

Would love to talk at least and see what you guys are hoping for.

Here's a picture from the place in the fall

https://goo.gl/photos/aHqpQdY5JQstY6SL8

Best to you!

-Jordan
2 years ago
I'm 25 and just last summer moved back to North Idaho where i grew up after some years of travel, sailing and short term work gigs. I've been dreaming of starting a little farm for quite some years. I kept my eyes on the real estate around and ended up making a friend who specializes in raw land and prepper kind of real estate. Towards the end of the summer I found 10.5 acre piece that was pretty much exactly what I wanted. I offered $60 with ten down. And the owner accepted. Scraped together the ten thousand including borrowing 2 from my little sister and bought my piece of land. I got a motorhome for free that I drug out there and put a wood stove in. Come spring I'll dig in, build my road, shop/house, some fencing and trees and whatever i can get done. I work as a carpenter, but I'm trying to transition to something less physically demanding, to have more energy leftover for my projects. I'm also open to the idea of teaming up. I have a few friends that have been talking about it, but we'll see. Contact me if you might be interested. I also love to mountain bike, climb, ski and surf, and this place is wonderful for all but one of those!
Best to you!

-Jordan
2 years ago
I really enjoyed everyone's ideas and experiences in this thread. I've lived for times with seven other friends. A big house but most had their own rooms. Three of us were very close and shared one room but had our own bathroom. It was perfect for us, and i look forward to returning to shared living situation with friends.

One of the biggest standout pros to me on a farm scenario is freedom. We all come from varying backgrounds of stability, but I imagine many of us have had extended chapters of free drifting and travel. Once you begin creating a farm, especially once you become responsible for year round animals, you have to pretty much be there almost every day. This isn't bad but can feel a bit limiting from a previous free lifestyle. The involvement of more people allows for travel weeks or months for any of the team, and I think this would be a huge benefit for sustainability on the personal level.
2 years ago