Tommy Wilder

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since Apr 29, 2018
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Recent posts by Tommy Wilder

If the boxes aren't closed on top, provide roofs over the compost boxes. Torrential rains cools the composting too much.
9 months ago
Living 30km from the nearest city, surrounded by farmland and national park, in the tropics, i have a need for protection from snakes, giant centipedes and the very occassional (often very poor) stranger. Carrying a large knife on my belt and a stick is very advisable here.
The knife, being a clearly visible deterrent is also very helpful in gardening (a bowie kind of model) and the stick (at least 1.5mtr!!)  is for carrying away the snakes if they do not move out of my vicinity by themselves. Another "weapon" is noise and stamping feet.
11 months ago
Having gone recently through land surveys and made A-frame, and bought a cheap chinese laser-level (around 50usd from a company called rowel), I have to admit that the laser was the right investment. It has to be usedin early morning or early evening, but itis readable up to 50mtrs. One of the surveys was so difficult because the land was so uneven due to previous agriculture tilling etc, that I ended up using trees on the site to get the elevations. For assist I taped an old measure tape onto a pvc pipe with a T-joint on the bottom. It is easy to find the laser on that tape. For reference I took the nearby road elevation from google-maps.

Hope this helps
11 months ago
Double post
1 year ago

Jeremy Torquoize wrote:

Tommy Wilder wrote:I've tried the setup with a solarpanel (40w) on  9ah gell batteries. Works ok, no heat.
In the near future I will research this more but a general way of thinking is this: monitoring of batteries is indeed a must! This i will approach with arduino/raspberry eleftronics. An arduino can monitor one or more batteries (don't know now) and a raspberry monitoring the data of the arduinos and decide which batteries needs charging. During charging that battery will be disconnected from the batt-bank, so the high charging voltage will be not exposed to connected electronics. So every battery will get it's own "address". Its probably already somewhere on the internet.
Further research will go into supercapacitors connecting to solarpanels as they should be very helpful in starting electromotors, which often require almost double the power during startup (need less panels and better for connected batteries).
Also, a 3rd aspect will be small setups. Panels near point-of-use. Cuts costs on cable.

Anyway, i'm in the process of building my home now. Probably move there in september, so then the thinkering starts....


I'd that the controlled overcharge setup or the BLS setup that "works okay, no heat..."? I'd be interested to know how it works out, especially if you're monitoring it with a raspberry pi. i was thinking of doing something similar where the collected data could be gathered and recorded in ascii. I was particularly interested in the universal battery charging system from earlier in this forum. But I might just keep it simple and use a voltage meter periodically.

After hearing this discussion about controlled overcharging, I'm even more convinced about the battery life saver now. If it's just a matter of breaking down the extra crystals, I can imagine how overcharging the plates can accomplish this. That being said, it makes even more sense how sending specific ripples into the battery can also shake off the deposits. There's an entire feild of physics about wave form energy across the various sciences, and how frequencies effect the results of things in various circumstances. A waveform technology may be all the controlled overcharge we need in a system. I'm definitely going to try it out now.



The "works okay, no heat" method was just a coarse setup, only a voltmeter and my hand was used, about every 15min or so. I assume too, that cristals can be solved if you hit them with some superimposed pulses of their resonance frequency (probably in the MHz range) on your dc. DC only is not enough, unless your batteries are new and do not have any cristals formed.

Soon as I have more info I will post it here. Again, good luck with the thinkering! Tom.
1 year ago

Jeremy Torquoize wrote:

Tommy Wilder wrote:I've tried the setup with a solarpanel (40w) on  9ah gell batteries. Works ok, no heat.
In the near future I will research this more but a general way of thinking is this: monitoring of batteries is indeed a must! This i will approach with arduino/raspberry eleftronics. An arduino can monitor one or more batteries (don't know now) and a raspberry monitoring the data of the arduinos and decide which batteries needs charging. During charging that battery will be disconnected from the batt-bank, so the high charging voltage will be not exposed to connected electronics. So every battery will get it's own "address". Its probably already somewhere on the internet.
Further research will go into supercapacitors connecting to solarpanels as they should be very helpful in starting electromotors, which often require almost double the power during startup (need less panels and better for connected batteries).
Also, a 3rd aspect will be small setups. Panels near point-of-use. Cuts costs on cable.

Anyway, i'm in the process of building my home now. Probably move there in september, so then the thinkering starts....


I'd that the controlled overcharge setup or the BLS setup that "works okay, no heat..."? I'd be interested to know how it works out, especially if you're monitoring it with a raspberry pi. i was thinking of doing something similar where the collected data could be gathered and recorded in ascii. I was particularly interested in the universal battery charging system from earlier in this forum. But I might just keep it simple and use a voltage meter periodically.

After hearing this discussion about controlled overcharging, I'm even more convinced about the battery life saver now. If it's just a matter of breaking down the extra crystals, I can imagine how overcharging the plates can accomplish this. That being said, it makes even more sense how sending specific ripples into the battery can also shake off the deposits. There's an entire feild of physics about wave form energy across the various sciences, and how frequencies effect the results of things in various circumstances. A waveform technology may be all the controlled overcharge we need in a system. I'm definitely going to try it out now.



The "works okay, no heat" method was just a coarse setup, only a voltmeter and my hand was used, about every 15min or so. I assume too, that cristals can be solved if you hit them with some superimposed pulses of their resonance frequency (probably in the MHz range) on your dc. DC only is not enough, unless your batteries are new and do not have any cristals formed.

Soon as I have more info I will post it here. Again, good luck with the thinkering! Tom.
1 year ago

Troy Rhodes wrote:

Tommy Wilder wrote:

Jeremy Torquoize wrote:New guy, new year! What's up? Has anyone here heard of the battery life saver? (BLS)
https://youtu.be/wtXhV4Qxk6g
It's said to salvage and maintain lead acid batteries by breaking up the crystal deposits that build up inside. I'll summarise the main points about it from what I've gathered.
•~$100
•Works in parallel with the battery bank (yes, all the batteries, all at once)
•Available for various voltage base Banks: you have to get one that matches the voltage range of your system.
•uses patented square wave technology to break up leftover crystal deposits inside the batteries.
•works upon full charge and discharge cycles
•uses a small amount of the batteries' own power, and often comes with a switch.

"It discharged my golf cart battery in one or two weeks!" Says one review. "We don't even use the golf cart that much." (I'm just paraphrasing)

Here's some Amazon reviews
https://www.amazon.com/Battery-BLS-48N-System-Desulfator-Rejuvenator/product-reviews/B006X26YA4

It has mixed reviews on Amazon, but I doubt they're all educated on how it actually works. One review mentioned frying someone's charger, which makes sense since it pumps square waves into the circuit. At least that's how I understand it.

That being said, I wonder how it would get along with certain kinds of charge controllers and other sensitive moderators. Late mention, I've never done solar in my life. I'm in the research phase, but I have a basic understanding of electronics. The science makes sense and I'm willing to try it. If it can extend the life of lead acid batteries like the claim said, it could be a major game changer.



Jeremy, you might want to research the chemical reactions in lead-acid batteries: it's a bit of a public "secret" that lead-acid batteries are slowly damaged, hence the short lifetime, by never let the battery control thecharging voltage. It is usually limited at 14 - 14.5v. Try hooking up a healthy lead-acid battery to a 12v solar panel and monitor the voltage. (Solarpanel should be able to handle the charge current). You will notice that the voltage rises until often 15.8-16.2v, and then settles around 15v later on. This is super important as at that moment of the top-voltage, ALL sulfate is back into the h2so4 solution, thereby bringing the battery in new condition.

In other words, allmost all chargers are slow killers, including the car charging system. If you could design or buy a charge system which has this option, your lead-acid battery might last you double, if not triple it's lifetime (speculation on my side!)

Happy researching!
Tom



A "controlled overcharge", which is pretty much what Tom described, is certainly a useful tool for prolonging the life of deep cycle lead acid batteries.  But it comes at a cost.  Shoving the last few percent of capacity into a battery becomes inefficient and will consume a disproportionate amount of electricity compared to what you actually store.  Plus, the battery will start to warm up and produce hydrogen gas in excess.  This will generally cause faster loss of electrolyte, so you'd have to watch it carefully.  Pushing too hard for too long can also start to cause material to be lost from the plates.

It's all a big balancing act.  The more sophisticated battery charging systems will have an input to monitor battery temperature for exactly this reason.



I've tried the setup with a solarpanel (40w) on  9ah gell batteries. Works ok, no heat.
In the near future I will research this more but a general way of thinking is this: monitoring of batteries is indeed a must! This i will approach with arduino/raspberry eleftronics. An arduino can monitor one or more batteries (don't know now) and a raspberry monitoring the data of the arduinos and decide which batteries needs charging. During charging that battery will be disconnected from the batt-bank, so the high charging voltage will be not exposed to connected electronics. So every battery will get it's own "address". Its probably already somewhere on the internet.
Further research will go into supercapacitors connecting to solarpanels as they should be very helpful in starting electromotors, which often require almost double the power during startup (need less panels and better for connected batteries).
Also, a 3rd aspect will be small setups. Panels near point-of-use. Cuts costs on cable.

Anyway, i'm in the process of building my home now. Probably move there in september, so then the thinkering starts....
1 year ago

Jeremy Torquoize wrote:New guy, new year! What's up? Has anyone here heard of the battery life saver? (BLS)
https://youtu.be/wtXhV4Qxk6g
It's said to salvage and maintain lead acid batteries by breaking up the crystal deposits that build up inside. I'll summarise the main points about it from what I've gathered.
•~$100
•Works in parallel with the battery bank (yes, all the batteries, all at once)
•Available for various voltage base Banks: you have to get one that matches the voltage range of your system.
•uses patented square wave technology to break up leftover crystal deposits inside the batteries.
•works upon full charge and discharge cycles
•uses a small amount of the batteries' own power, and often comes with a switch.

"It discharged my golf cart battery in one or two weeks!" Says one review. "We don't even use the golf cart that much." (I'm just paraphrasing)

Here's some Amazon reviews
https://www.amazon.com/Battery-BLS-48N-System-Desulfator-Rejuvenator/product-reviews/B006X26YA4

It has mixed reviews on Amazon, but I doubt they're all educated on how it actually works. One review mentioned frying someone's charger, which makes sense since it pumps square waves into the circuit. At least that's how I understand it.

That being said, I wonder how it would get along with certain kinds of charge controllers and other sensitive moderators. Late mention, I've never done solar in my life. I'm in the research phase, but I have a basic understanding of electronics. The science makes sense and I'm willing to try it. If it can extend the life of lead acid batteries like the claim said, it could be a major game changer.



Jeremy, you might want to research the chemical reactions in lead-acid batteries: it's a bit of a public "secret" that lead-acid batteries are slowly damaged, hence the short lifetime, by never let the battery control thecharging voltage. It is usually limited at 14 - 14.5v. Try hooking up a healthy lead-acid battery to a 12v solar panel and monitor the voltage. (Solarpanel should be able to handle the charge current). You will notice that the voltage rises until often 15.8-16.2v, and then settles around 15v later on. This is super important as at that moment of the top-voltage, ALL sulfate is back into the h2so4 solution, thereby bringing the battery in new condition.

In other words, allmost all chargers are slow killers, including the car charging system. If you could design or buy a charge system which has this option, your lead-acid battery might last you double, if not triple it's lifetime (speculation on my side!)

Happy researching!
Tom
1 year ago

Nathanael Szobody wrote:Thanks for some informative replies guys. It looks like some people would be interested in contributing to a sort of 'testimonial' database in herbal tropical remedies. The next question would be, what platform to use for this sort of thing?



By platform you mean software?  If you go the linux way and then for instance use joomla or something like it, it is free of software licenses. I do not have much experience but I use linux on my pc and have looked into some web creating software packages for a future setup on a raspberry pi (low power computer). It does not have to cost much moneywise, it will however eat time....

1 year ago
Maybe some added info:
Having at one time, in an emergency repair used thin cardboard to seal carburators (which will work for a short period of time), i like to add that the choice for gasoline-resistant sealant is limited. There is something in the market which does the work fine. It is called hylomar blue. Works ok and is a lot cheaper than dedicated gaskets from the manufacturer (mostly neoprene or viton).
1 year ago