Paul Cereghino

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since Jan 11, 2010
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South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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Recent posts by Paul Cereghino

Spring Field Station is almost here. Do you like to spend time outside exploring your relationship with ecosystems? Please consider joining us.  

Our field stations are dispersed camps on the Skykomish River, for learning about ecosystems, restoration, and agroforestry. This spring camp will revolve around tending old plantings and preparing sites for next winter's camps. The campsite is within a 100-acre tribally-owned river forest, where we are assessing and tending multiple sites, working closely with tribal crews, to restore biodiversity and increase the cultural value of these ecologically important areas. We aim to develop a replicable system by which any person can develop the relationships and skills to develop a bio-cultural stewardship relationship on conservation lands throughout the Salish Sea, as part of a network of stewards.  

The current site steward, Paul Cereghino has 35 years of experience in Salish Sea conservation, with a practical background in landscape construction, field ecology, and environmental horticulture, and professional work in cartography, regional restoration planning, river ecology, and salmon recovery. Representatives from the Snohomish Conservation District are our hosts. Teaching and learning are student-directed, organic, and often embodied. Participation is free in exchange for around four hours a day of your labor, tailored to your abilities.  

Field Stations attract a unique and interesting crowd for learning and networking, and the relaxed pace allows for the exploration of a range of practical and conceptual topics about the stewardship of our bioregion. Inhabiting a restoration site allows for a deeper connection with the place and deeper conversations about the meaning of ecological restoration in this context. We hope you will join us.  

REGISTRATION  https://forms.gle/N6gTNBNhUyodJ9Sv6

https://salishsearestoration.org/.../Skykomish_Field_Station
3 weeks ago
Thank you Riona,
There are groups such as Rewild Portland working on social forestry projects. I have also heard of group emerging around the Johnson Creek Watershed... I'd approach Quinn through the Regenerate Cascadia platform... looking to develop sites among the many restoration projects along that riverscape.

Paul
3 months ago
Please consider joining us,  
Our field stations are dispersed camps on the Skykomish River, for learning about ecosystems, restoration, and agroforestry. This winter camp will revolve around transplanting and layering shrubs. The campsite is within a 100-acre tribally-owned river forest, where we are assessing and tending multiple sites, working closely with tribal crews, to restore biodiversity and increase the cultural value of these ecologically important areas. We aim to develop a replicable system by which any person can develop the relationships and skills to develop a bio-cultural stewardship relationship on conservation lands throughout the Salish Sea, as part of a network of stewards.  
The current site steward, Paul Cereghino has 35 years of experience in Salish Sea conservation, with a practical background in landscape construction, field ecology and environmental horticulture, and professional work in cartography, regional restoration planning, river ecology, and salmon recovery. Representatives from the Snohomish Conservation District are our hosts. Teaching and learning are student-directed, organic and often embodied. Participation is free in exchange for your labor.  
Field stations attract a unique and interesting crowd for learning and networking, and the relaxed pace allows for the exploration of a range of practical and conceptual topics about the stewardship of our bioregion. Inhabiting a restoration site allows for a deeper connection with the place and deeper conversations about the meaning of ecological restoration in this context. We hope you will join us.  
Registration - https://forms.gle/tMqHCcNTQmrLNn9r8  
https://salishsearestoration.org/wiki/The_Ecosystem_Guild/Skykomish_Field_Station
3 months ago
Hello Dear Colleagues,

Join us Oct 20-23 at our last planned field station and retreat of 2023. We are continuing preparations in the "mother garden" along the Skykomish River, and will return in February for a winter camp or two and the propagation season. We will continue assessments of patches, and also start layering (and exploring root cuttings) on hazelnuts, one of the common shrubby tree species on the dry river edge soils and a great basket material.

https://forms.gle/tMqHCcNTQmrLNn9r8

We've have had an additional conversation with our hosts at the Tulalip Tribes Natural Resources Department, and they appreciated the work done and the direction we are headed, including the continued development of meadows and forest edge around railroad camp, as well as plan for a conservation thinning on a dense 20 year old conifer plantation 15 minutes downstream.

There are new properties coming into conservation along the river. Come become a site steward in our bioregional incubator and co-create the 250-year plan for stewardship and cultivation of Salish Sea river forests. Events involve dispersed camping without cost as part of a special volunteer training program with the Snohomish Conservation District.
https://salishsearestoration.org/wiki/The_Ecosystem_Guild/Skykomish_Field_Station
7 months ago
We still have a few camp sites and the river is calling. Join us for a long weekend on the Skykomish River, near Monroe, Washington. We are working as guests on tribal land to prototype a regional self-organized volunteer-led system for increasing the constructive human presence on conservation lands.  

What does a temporary regenerative residence look like? That's what we get to figure out.  

Here's the signup, with links back to other resources. We camp, assist in the regeneration of riparian forests, play, forage, and tell stories.  https://forms.gle/tMqHCcNTQmrLNn9r8  

In addition to a fun opportunity to get dirty and swim in the river, our prototype camp is an opportunity for co-education and apprenticeship to support future "site stewards".
 
We have started documenting our work in pictures on the Salish Sea Wiki (a sister project), our bioregional open knowledge network. Joining this effort is free and volunteer-led.  

https://salishsearestoration.org/wiki/The_Ecosystem_Guild/Skykomish_Field_Station
9 months ago
We are going out again at the end of August...

Join us for a long weekend on the Skykomish River, near Monroe, Washington. We are working as guests on tribal land to prototype a regional self-organized volunteer-led system for increasing the constructive human presence and regenerative tending of conservation lands.

What does all that mean?... we figure it out by doing it.  Here's the signup, with links back to other resources. We camp, assist in the regeneration of riparian forests, play, forage, and tell stories.

https://forms.gle/tMqHCcNTQmrLNn9r8

In addition to a fun opportunity to get dirty and swim in the river, our prototype camp is an opportunity for co-education and apprenticeship to support future "site stewards".

We have started documenting our work in pictures on the Salish Sea Wiki (a sister project), our bioregional open knowledge network.

https://salishsearestoration.org/wiki/The_Ecosystem_Guild/Skykomish_Field_Station

9 months ago
It is a good float... and our field station has a lovely swimming beach... Here's the flier...
9 months ago
Hello Folks,

Come join us for a long weekend on the Skykomish River near Monroe, Washington. We are experimenting with the "restoration" of useful native forests on conservation sites for foraging and harvest.
Here is the invitation. This is part of a larger vision of a semi-nomadic-land-access-and-distributed-gathering-places-in-exchange-for-stewardship vision.

https://ecosystemguild.org/2022/05/08/invitation-to-camp-skykomish/



9 months ago
In Daron and my neck of the woods, the natural development of soil following disturbance is often through fast growing nitrogen fixing trees like red alder.

Ecologists talk about primary succession (from rock) and secondary succession (colonization of empty spaces following a disturbance like wind, flood, or fire).  Theories like succession seem to suggest an orderly sequence, are currently replaced in the vegetation ecology literature by more complicated views of vegetation development, like "assembly theory" in which lots of different factors determine who comes, and what happens next.

In a permaculture design, the gardener becomes a source of continuous disturbance and dispersal.  So we are working within an ecological framework, and thinking about disturbance and colonization, but are no longer sitting by and waiting for things to happen.  We bring in abundant nitrogen fixers and tap rooted species, and accelerate the pulsing of growth and decay.

And yes... if you plant a fussy tree on bad soil with no subsidy of any kind, it will suffer.  Sometimes nutrients (manures etc...) are used to replace the services of healthy soil temporarily, until successional dynamics kick in.
7 years ago