charlotte anthony

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since Mar 12, 2010
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Recent posts by charlotte anthony

in reading about gut health and body healing, i am reminded that growing food with microbes whether by innoculating with microbes or not tilling, keeping all gound covered at all times, planting with 20 to 30 different plants.  too much feeding of the plants stops the microbes and mycorrhizals.   in short  regenerative agriculture, gives us gut health, stops diseases chronic or acute in their tracks.
8 months ago
as a cranioscral therapist i worked successfully (meaning their symptoms cleared quickly) on a lot of folks with concussion.  i also had a major stroke and got help from both acupuncture and homeopathy.
8 months ago
john kempf head of  AEA, has a consulting firm, which has 5 million acres of farm land in the u.s. (and rising) where food is  grown  without bugs and diseases.  Also the growing costs are significantly less than commercial ag and the yields signficantly improved, so they can earn the money from their farming to pay the consultant.   they  are a front  runner in regenerative agriculture.  the theory behind what they do is that when all the needs of the plants are met  bugs and disease are rare. some one has observed that when you look in nature many of the plants seem to have holes etc.  this could be caused by all the toxins being used in the air.      when we add what we think the plants need is is a) expensive and b) does not meet the plants needs.  the microbes woring with the plants know what "their" plants need.

you can google regenerative ag and find lots of good stuff about this.  some basics are a)no till  b) no bare ground, 3) significant diversity (like 20 different plants together), d) high microbial activity,  including animals in the systems.

very important is that when you add too much off site materials, you actually lose microbial input.  

one thing i really like about regenerative agriculture  is that when these methods are used CO2 is taken out of the air and turned into carbon in the ground.  this of course is the #1 job of plants.   food grown in this way feeds our microbiome which means that most of our diseases chronic and acute will disappear,   (just lke with the plants).  we need for this to happen on a large percentage of our farm land for these benefits to .occur.

i was traveling around various places in the world to demonstrate these methods.  i am getting too old to travel comfortably and would love to work with a group of people helping farmers to convert to these methods.  if any of you know of anything like this please tell me.  many thanks.

i was up visiting a group which trains and supports homeless folks in getting jobs in the system.  i got the idea to have a CCC group again where we repair our watersheds which will stop of the fires, and work to convert farms to regenerative agriculture.
8 months ago
am working on construction of replacement housing (for fire destroyed) in the mckenzie river area.

someone told me that the wissner's had gotten building dept approval for at least one rocket stove.  where can i find out about this.
9 months ago
it looks like i would have to buy the bricks from the company.  not that a lot of hemp is available locally this seems a shame.  
9 months ago
i am wanting to reply to this thread and not just to this post.  thank you all for some great things to consider.  i am right now working in the city of eugene on a property where we will build both temporary and permament housing.  a great idea you might be interested in where homeless folk help build their own temporary sturcture, participate in other ways to earn money which will be created on site, as well as be involved in building a permanent structure.   i am interested in very inexpensive specific ways of permanent construction.  are there other treads on permies that have ways of building, meaning the actual building materials that would work for nonskilled labor.

many thanks.
9 months ago
We held a permablitz on the 13th, 14th and 15th of december.

Many of us learned to make clay slip that we then stuffed into pallets which can be used for the walls of a building.

We learned how to use sho sugi ban, a japanese technic where we burn, in our case with a blow torch, wooden pallets that we will use for a foundation for a building.  After scaping off excess burned material we coated the pallets with used motor oil, again not the traditional japanese technic.  They used this technic to preserve wood, lasting sometimes 1000 years.

We also learned to take the bark off of posts that we gleaned from a nearby forrest.  These posts were for a roundhouse that we are building.

My hope for the weekend was that we get the roundhouse constructed.  Huckleberry who was to show us how he constructed one in 2 hours could not come.  Instead he sent a video and parts of his book.

My hope for the permablitz movement we are starting is that people will learn from an emerging paradigm in a present moment to construct the round house and more

see theory  https://www.presencing.org/aboutus/theory-u   these methods have been used for millium by indigeneous peoples.  

This first of the permablitz  did not work as desired.    I had done this practice while creating more than 650 gardens in Eugene Oregon.  There was no explanation beforehand.  People in small groups seemed to rapidly respond to me doing the process with them.  The down side was that with no debriefing.  Folks grocked that they were involved in something amazing but did not have a language for it.  Many people returned again and again to drink from the well of people working and creating together in this way.  

Folks had a great time, formed new friendships and many even told of extraordinary creativity.  So a taste of what could be did happen.

I have spent the preceding week visiting both folks who attended and other friends who did not.  This is where I learned of theory U.  The indigenous methods do not require any words or explanations.  One friend says though that it does take time.  I am reminded of the story of a war council of some plains indians.  They spoke around the fire for 18 hours.  They were not stragegizing about how to do war.  More they were listening to their guides and speaking from their hearts.  At some point, an elder stood up.  The council was over.  It was clear that the speaking had done its work and it was time to begin.  

We had a large group with many scattered parts.  Now I see we needed maybe to have a preceremony the week before where people had a council to clear themselves to open to a sacred space.  Or maybe we just need to start small, most folks to not want to come to ceremonies to make way for the sacred.

So our next permablitz will be open to a small number of women.  We hope to be able to form a group that we can then add to.

I feel strongly that our current paradigm of fear is paving the way for us all to become paralyzed noodles where we give away our power to join a glorious future of love.

I and my partners are going forward with our vision to have a practice for action where we are alive in the presence of joy and fulfillment of our needs.

please see permablitz pacific northwest on facebook if you want to learn more.
this video of a portable round house building was done by huckleberry several years ago.  the round house was done by huckleberry.  do not know who did the video.  this is great.  it could be covered with canvis much like a teepee inside at the end.  

brendan mcnamara, part of requirements to receive a permablitz is that you contribute to at least one permabliz  we have a team coming from shelton huckleberry is near shelton and several other folks are coming from there including julie.  consider joining them if you want to learn and receive a permablitz yourself.
we will more likely build the walls from pallets filled with cob and straw.    this will most likely be dryable with an inside heater.  there will be a large roof overhang, so we can also put the heater outside for the outside walls.  i like the cordwood thickness so we might put on over time 2 or even 3 layers of cob pallet wall.

i tend to push the envelope, finding ways to make things work with what we have.  it does not need to last 100 years.

we may not get the "tea house" finished.  we know we will get the portable round house finished.  this is something we might form a coop to build for people on the land who have access to forest gleanings to make an incoime for themselves.