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Neil Moffett

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since Feb 04, 2020
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Recent posts by Neil Moffett

There's a Foxfire Book on this subject.  I don't have it in front of me, but there you go.
2 months ago
It may not add many calories but there's a lot for the pig to eat in the ground there.  They're omnivores.  My concern on a slope would be erosion, after they root up the soil and if it rains.  As you'll have plenty of tree roots to mitigate that, you ought to do well.
2 months ago
t posts are fine but you may want to get 6 ft posts and drive them in so the tops are level with the hog panels.  If they're happy, as thomas says they're unlikely to try to get out.  But you'll likely want to remove any electric in there when you're loading (unless you want a shock!) and a 300 pound pig leaning up against a t post that's only 1 foot in the ground can bend it over without really trying.
2 months ago
You got a great deal AND you let your soft heart have its way and gave the pig a nice comfy last few days.

Tip of the cap to you pal.  
4 months ago
This isn't how electric fencing works.

The way that electric fencing works is that the fence is on ALL THE TIME so that when a young animal touches the fence, it gets a shock.  Depending on how smart the animal is, it learns not to touch the fence.

After that, the animal won't touch anything that looks like the fence.  It doesn't matter if it has a charge or not.  You can unplug it if you want.

If the animal accidentally touches the fence too many times and doesn't get a shock, depending on how smart it is, it will learn that the fence doesn't work any more.

If you want to make a "smart" fence, develop a herd that learns quickly not to touch the fence, and is risk-averse to testing the fence later on.

You're treating the animal like a cog in a system, and trying to engineer the system.  The animal has a brain, and can easily game whatever system you devise. You need to work on animal psychology, not electronics.
4 months ago

Anj Herrem wrote:If I am planning on having 2 and rotating them weekly or bi-weekly how big of a pen would be sufficient?



If you're planning on MOVING all the hog panels weekly...I would ask why.  

I wouldn't put any number of pigs on less than 1/8 of an acre.  They like to explore, they're not ruminants that just chew cud all day.  Limit their space too much and they'll try to get out.  That said, you can keep quite in a 1/4 acre at a time if you move them frequently.

I'm trying to figure out why you would move hog panels weekly instead of just using electric.  You can run a charger off a 12 volt battery.  Get 2 deep cycle batteries and change the battery every day to be safe, while one is on the fence the other is charging.  For pig electric you just need 2 polywires.  We use fiberglass posts but heck, you could cut your own from wood and a bag of plastic clips for the polywire is like $10, that's all you need.

Yes the charger is going to cost you a few hundred dollars, but I would think you could resell it if you don't want to keep it and it's going to be cheaper than hog paneling 1/8 of an acre.

Use the 16x32 hog panel pen to train your piglets to the fence.  Put the polywire right next to the panel so they bump into the wire, get a shock, and then bounce off the fence.  If they're happy where they are (food, water, stuff to root around in) they'll learn fast to respect the fence.
4 months ago