Judson Carroll

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I am a certified Master Herbalist and Permaculturist from the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, USA. I began learning about herbs and their uses from the old Appalachian folks, especially the Hicks family of Beech Creek, when I was around 15.

Author of 4 books (so far):
The Herbs and Weeds of Fr. Johannes Künzle
The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guide
Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People
Christian Herbal Medicine, History and Practice

I host the Southern Appalachian Herbal Podcast: Southern Appalachian Herbs https://www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbs

I also write a weekly article on herbs and their properties: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com

My passion is being outside, enjoying the woods, the water and the garden. My mission is to revive the tradition of “folk medicine” in America, so families can care for their own ailments at home, using the herbs God gave us for that purpose. I am a moderator and contributor for The Grow Network.
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Recent posts by Judson Carroll



Pawpaw is another of our uniquely native plants. I’d love to tell you it has all kinds of impressive, medicinal properties… and it does have some… but its main value is its fruit. The Pawpaw is our native “tropical” fruit, that grows in temperate regions. It was long considered a variety of papaya, but it is a unique and distinct tree. Sometimes called the Custard Apple, this fruit has a tropical flavor, but grows best in the mountains and hills. It is a smallish tree, one that inhabits the under-story. It would be far more common were it not for the practices of real estate and forestry that clear the understory, in favor of tall trees for timber and landscape. Pawpaws like a mixed forest, not a park-like setting or a timber stand.

Two other factors have led to the Pawpaw falling out of favor as a favorite American fruit. The first is simply that knowledge of this fruit has not been passed down through the generations as 32 it was in earlier times. If only we still had intact families, where grandparents and parents took the kids into the woods and meadows to teach them about wild edible and medicinal plants! If families still spent such time together, foraging, hunting, fishing, trapping and gardening, we would likely have far more intact families! The second has to do with market forces. The fruit and vegetables we see in modern grocery stores are not offered for their flavor or nutritional value. No, modern produce is chosen specifically for its ability to withstand shipping long distances while still appearing fresh, and its shelf life. The tomato you buy was likely shipped thousands of miles. The fruit you buy may have come even further. The watermelon is by no means the full flavored, vitamin packed watermelon our grandparents enjoyed… it is chosen for its tough, thick rind and uniform appearance. That it has little flavor is of little concern to modern agri-business. Pawpaws are delicious fruit, but they will not stand shipping. Their shelf life is similar to a ripe banana. They make a fine fruit for local farmer’s markets and roadside fruit stands, but rarely, if ever, will you see them in a grocery store.

As for medicinal use, the fruit is laxative when eaten in large amounts. The leaves are diuretic, and make a good poultice for wounds, boils, infections and inflammations. The bark may be used as a digestive bitter. There is also some history of use as a wash in cases of head lice.

Of the seeds, Mrs. Grieve writes:

Emetic, for which a saturated tincture of the bruised seeds is employed, dose, 10 to 60 drops. The bark is a bitter tonic and is said to contain a powerful acid, the leaves are used as an application to boils and ulcers.

Pawpaw trees may be purchased from many nurseries that specialize in fruit trees or who cater to Permaculture folks. I hope my readers will consider planting Pawpaws. I’d love to see some of these natives that are becoming all too rare become popular – A Pawpaw, Persimmon and Passionfruit vine in every yard!

Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests states:

Grows in rich soils along streams. I have observed it in Fairfield and Spartanburg districts, South Carolina, and collected it in St. John’s; Mr. Elliott says it is found at Beck's ferry, Savannah river, and North Carolina. Fl. May. Diet, de Mat. Med par Mer and de L. tom. i, 311. The rind of the fruit of the A. triloba of Linn, possesses a very active acid; pulp sometimes employed as a topical application in ulcers. Lind. Nat. Syst. Bot. 69. "Juice of unripe fruit is a powerful and efficient vermifuge; the powder of the seeds answers the same purpose; a principal constituent of the juice is fibrin—a product supposed peculiar to animal substances and to fungi." " The tree has, moreover, the property of rendering the toughest animal substances tender by causing a separation of the muscular fibre—its very vapor even does this; newly killed meat suspended over the leaves, and even old hogs and poultry, when fed on the leaves and fruit, become ' tender in a few hours!' " Lind. loc. cit. The sap of the Papaw tree, {Carica papaya), which is extracted from the fruit by incision, is white and excessively viscous. In a specimen from the Isle of France, Yauquelin found a matter having the chemical properties of animal albumen, and lastly, fatty matter. Boussingault. This tree can be found in many parts of the South and I would invite examination into these very curious properties. For an excellent 33 description of the Papaw, see Hooker in the Bot. Magazine, 808. At Pittsburgh, a spirituous liquor has been made from the fruit. Michaux notices that the cellular integument of the bark, and particularly that of the roots, exhales in summer a nauseous odor so strong as to occasion sickness if respired in confined air. Am. Sylva.

King's American Dispensatory, 1898 tells us of Pawpaw:

Action, Uses, and Dosage.—Emetic, for which purpose a saturated tincture of the bruised seeds is employed, in doses of from 10 to 60 drops. The bark is said to be a bitter tonic and has been used as such in domestic practice. The medical properties of this agent have not been fully investigated.

Peterson Field Guides Eastern and Central Medicinal Plants tells us:

Fruit edible, delicious; also a laxative. Leaves insecticidal, diarrhetic; Applied to abscesses. Seeds emetic, narcotic producing stupor. The powdered seeds, formally applied to the heads of children to control lice, having insecticidal properties. Warning: seeds toxic. Leaves may cause rash.



This article is an excerpt from The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guide: by Judson Carroll

His New book is:



Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else

Read About Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else: http://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9R



His other works include:

The Encyclopedia of Bitter Medicinal Herbs:

southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5



Christian Medicine, History and Practice:

https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTB



Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People

southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.html

Also available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25



Look Up: The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guide

http:///www.amazon.com/dp/1005082936



The Herbs and Weeds of Fr. Johannes Künzle:

https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/05/announcing-new-book-herbs-and-weeds-of.html



Author: Judson Carroll. Judson Carroll is an Herbalist from the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina.

His weekly articles may be read at judsoncarroll.com

His weekly podcast may be heard at: www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbs

He offers free, weekly herb classes: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325



Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or condition. Nothing on this site has been evaluated or approved by the FDA. I am not a doctor. The US government does not recognize the practice of herbal medicine and their is no governing body regulating herbalists. Therefore, I'm just a guy who studies herbs. I am not offering any advice. I won't even claim that anything I write is accurate or true! I can tell you what herbs have "traditionally been used for." I can tell you my own experience and if I believe an herb helped me. I cannot, nor would I tell you to do the same. If you use any herb I, or anyone else, mentions you are treating yourself. You take full responsibility for your health. Humans are individuals and no two are identical. What works for me may not work for you. You may have an allergy, sensitivity or underlying condition that no one else shares and you don't even know about. Be careful with your health. By continuing to read my blog you agree to be responsible for yourself, do your own research, make your own choices and not to blame me for anything, ever.
11 hours ago
In this episode, I discuss the fascinating and even mythical properties of the Bay Laurel.  This plant is powerfully medicinal and also an excellent culinary herb.  I also make the point that folks shouldn't lie about Hippocrates or act like gurus.



https://www.spreaker.com/user/13414994/bay

Read about my new book, Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else:  https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.html

Available for purchase on Amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9R

Visit my Substack and sign up for my free newsletter: https://judsoncarroll.substack.com/

Read about my new other book, The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Bitter Herbs: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5

and

Christian Medicine, History and Practice: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTB


Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.html

Also available on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25

Podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbs

Blog: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/

Free Video Lessons: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325
2 days ago
I don't know if it matters in terms pf practicality... but if I saw a pretty lady in a cloak, I would ask... "Are you single? May I take you to dinner?'  THere is something about a fresh face, long hair and a cloak.
6 days ago


I hope y'all will enjoy my new show on prepperbroadcasting.com - it is a big opportunity for me, and I am honored to be a member of the team.  Here is the link to episode 1:  https://www.spreaker.com/episode/49760381

This show, entitled Herbal Medicine for Preppers, is different from my regular Southern Appalachian Herbs podcast.  We are starting with short, 15 min +/- weekly episodes that will focus in on practical advice about Herbal Medicine and self-reliance.  Eventually, I will begin doing live shows so that we can interact, and I can answer your questions.

Please spread the word!
1 week ago


Now, this one is interesting! I would have considered it more of a shrub than a tree, but several sources list it as a native tree… so, who am I to argue? It is certainly a unique plant and a valuable herb. The Devil’s Walking stick grows throughout much of my region, from the mountains down to the piedmont, and even occasionally found in the coastal counties of NC. This Aralia is called Devil’s Walking Stick, because it not only grows straight and is the right size and shape for a walking stick, but the trunk is covered in wicked thorns. I have backed into a few, not paying attention in the woods…. NOT FUN! It may also be called Hercules’ Club, Prickly Ash or Prickly Elder.

This plant is in the same family as Ginseng. It has long been used medicinally. Early settlers found the berries useful for toothaches, as the plant has analgesic properties. The fresh bark is said to be emetic and purgative. The dried bark is stimulating, alterative, meaning it gradually brings one back to health., and diaphoretic, meaning it helps resolve a fever. The effects of the dried bark put it in the category of the other aralias and ginsengs, it is a mild adaptogen. Adaptogens help the body recover from stress.

Mrs. Grieve referred to Aralia spinosa as “Angelica Tree”, stating of its use:

Fresh bark causes/vomiting and purging, but dried is a stimulating alterative. A tincture made from the bark is used for rheumatism, skin diseases and syphilis. The berries in tincture form, lull pain in decayed teeth and in other parts of the body, violent colic and rheumatism, useful in cholera when a cathartic is required in the following compound: 1 drachm compound powdered Jalap, 1 drachm Aralia spinosa, 2 drachms compound rhubarb powder or infused in 1/2, pint boiling water and when cold taken in tablespoonful doses every half-hour. This does not produce choleric discharges. Also a powerful sialogogue and valuable in diseases where mouth and throat get dry, and for sore throat; will relieve difficult breathing and produce moisture if given in very small doses of the powder. The bark, root, and berries can all be utilized.

Traditionally, Aralia Spinosa has been used somewhat interchangeably with Arailia Hispida and shares many of the qualities of Sarsaparilla (smilax) as a mild adaptogen, alterative or general tonic…. In many ways, it is a larger, weaker version of American Spikenard. Aralia racemose, but still quite useful.

Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests states:

TOOTHACHE BUSH; ANGELICA TREE; PKICKLY ASH; PEICKLY ELDER, (Amlia spinosa, L.) Collected in St. John's; rich soils along fences; Charleston, Florida and North Carolina.

Plant often confounded with the Xanthoxylon ; properties somewhat similar. See JC. Fraxineium which is the true Prickly Ash. Ell. Bot. 373 ; Mer. and de L. Diet, de M. Med. i, 379; Coxe, Am. Disp. 100; Shcc. Elora Carol. 191; Frost's Elems. 20; Griffith, Med. Bot. 345.

It is a stimulating and very certain diaphoretic, " probably to be preferred to any emetic yet discovered among our native plants." This species is more stimulating than the A. nudicaulis. The infusion of the bark of the root is used in chronic rheumatism and cutaneous eruptions, also employed in lues venerea. Pursh states that a vinous or spirituous infusion of the berries is remarkable for 31 their power in relieving rheumatic pains, and the tincture is also given in Virginia in violent colics. See Dr. Meara's experiments. Merat says, it has been used to allay pain caused by carious teeth. Dose, of the saturated tincture, a tablespoonful three times a day. A decoction is often preferred in rheumatism, made by boiling an ounce of the bark in a quart of water; taken in divided doses several times a day. In South Carolina, this plant is the rattlesnake's master par excellence, according to the negroes; they rely on it almost exclusively as a remedy for the bite of serpents. I am informed that they use the bark of the fresh root in substance, taken internally, also applying it powdered to the wounded part. Dr. Meara advises that the watery infusion, when employed as a diaphoretic, should be made very weak, as it is apt to excite nausea, and cause irritation of the salivary glands.


King's American Dispensatory, 1898 tells us:

Action, Medical Uses, and Dosage.—The fresh bark will produce vomiting and purging; but when dried it is a stimulating alterative, producing a determination toward the surface. The tincture has been used in syphilitic and rheumatic affections, and in some diseases of the skin. The warm infusion, especially when strong, is apt to induce vomiting. The berries in tincture have been found useful in lulling the pain from a decayed tooth; also in various painful affections of other parts. Much use was made of this bark by physicians in Cincinnati during the cholera of 1849-50, in cases where cathartics were required, but where the action of every purgative was difficult to control; the preparation was composed of 1 drachm of compound powder of jalap, 1 drachm of aralia spinosa, and 2 drachms of compound powder of rhubarb. Given in powder, in half-teaspoonful doses; or the powder was infused in half a pint of boiling water, of which infusion, when cold, a tablespoonful was given every half hour. In no case in which it was given did it produce a tendency to looseness or choleraic discharges. It is a powerful sialagogue, and is valuable in diseases where the mouth and throat are dry and parched, as a very small portion of the powder will produce a moisture and relieve difficult breathing; also useful in sore throat. The dose of tincture (bark ℥viij to dilute alcohol Oj) is from 5 to 60 drops, of the infusion (℥ss to aqua Oj) a tablespoonful to a wineglassful.

- Photo credit: By Eric Hunt - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=93180157



This article is an excerpt from The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guide: by Judson Carroll

His New book is:



Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else

Read About Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else: http://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9R



His other works include:

The Encyclopedia of Bitter Medicinal Herbs:

southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5



Christian Medicine, History and Practice:

https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTB



Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People

southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.html

Also available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25



Look Up: The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guide

http:///www.amazon.com/dp/1005082936



The Herbs and Weeds of Fr. Johannes Künzle:

https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/05/announcing-new-book-herbs-and-weeds-of.html



Author: Judson Carroll. Judson Carroll is an Herbalist from the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina.

His weekly articles may be read at judsoncarroll.com

His weekly podcast may be heard at: www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbs

He offers free, weekly herb classes: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325



Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or condition. Nothing on this site has been evaluated or approved by the FDA. I am not a doctor. The US government does not recognize the practice of herbal medicine and their is no governing body regulating herbalists. Therefore, I'm just a guy who studies herbs. I am not offering any advice. I won't even claim that anything I write is accurate or true! I can tell you what herbs have "traditionally been used for." I can tell you my own experience and if I believe an herb helped me. I cannot, nor would I tell you to do the same. If you use any herb I, or anyone else, mentions you are treating yourself. You take full responsibility for your health. Humans are individuals and no two are identical. What works for me may not work for you. You may have an allergy, sensitivity or underlying condition that no one else shares and you don't even know about. Be careful with your health. By continuing to read my blog you agree to be responsible for yourself, do your own research, make your own choices and not to blame me for anything, ever.
1 week ago
https://www.spreaker.com/user/13414994/announcements-injuries-and-artichokes

In this episode, I announce my new collaboration with prepperbroadcasting.com, give some social media updates, mention that I dislocated my shoulder recently and discuss how I treat such injuries with herbs and get into the medicinal and culinary properties of the Artichoke.



https://www.spreaker.com/user/13414994/announcements-injuries-and-artichokes



Read about my new book, Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else:  https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.html

Available for purchase on Amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9R

Visit my Substack and sign up for my free newsletter: https://judsoncarroll.substack.com/

Read about my new other book, The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Bitter Herbs: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5

and

Christian Medicine, History and Practice: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTB


Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.html

Also available on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25

Podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbs

Blog: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/

Free Video Lessons: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325
1 week ago
Saturday night when I was 24... go out, play some music, maybe sit in with a band, have a few drinks, try to meet girls.
Saturday night at 44... cooking burritos for me and my dog, dislocate shoulder stretching in a doorframe.

Rachel Lindsay wrote:1) My mother loves Mimosa trees for their looks--now she'll love them even more when I send her this post!

2) In a perennial-buying frenzy at Tractor Supply last spring I grabbed a tiny Serviceberry plant, although I had no idea what it was or what to do with it. Well, now I know! ✔ Thanks!



They are very pretty trees, and they smell great too!
2 weeks ago


Albizia, Mimosa

Two Mimosas have been naturalized in my region, though neither grow at my elevation. Mimosa is a very important herb, so I make a point of scouting for trees during my travels throughout the summer and gathering flowers from those trees in the spring. Mimosa has the unique ability to reduce mast cells, which are the receptors for histamines in an allergic reaction. In that way, Mimosa is almost a reverse antihistamine that is more effective than most antihistamines, long term. Mimosa is also a mild narcotic, that can reduce pain and relax the body. Although the leaves and bark may be used, a tincture of the flowers is sweet smelling and tastes reminiscent of watermelon – it is not only among my favorite medicinal herbs but finds its way into the occasional cocktail!

Plants for A Future states: Medicinal use of Mimosa:

The flower heads are carminative, digestive, sedative and tonic. They are used internally in the treatment of insomnia, irritability, breathlessness and poor memory. The flowers are harvested as they open and are dried for later use. The stembark is anodyne, anthelmintic, carminative, discutient, diuretic, oxytocic, sedative, stimulant, tonic, vermifuge and vulnerary. It is used internally in the treatment of insomnia, irritability, boils and carbuncles. Externally, it is applied to injuries and swellings. The bark is harvested in spring or late summer and is dried for later use. A gummy extract obtained from the plant is used as a plaster for abscesses, boils etc and also as a retentive in fractures and sprains



Amelanchier, Serviceberry

Twenty six varieties of Serviceberry are used medicinally or for fruit: Amelanchier alnifolia – Saskatoon, Amelanchier alnifolia cusickii - Cusick's Serviceberry, Amelanchier alnifolia semiintegrifolia - Pacific Serviceberry, Amelanchier arborea - Downy Serviceberry, Amelanchier asiatica - Korean Juneberry, Amelanchier bartramiana, Amelanchier basalticola, Amelanchier canadensis – Juneberry, Amelanchier confuse, Amelanchier humilis, Amelanchier huroensis, Amelanchier interior, Amelanchier intermedia, Amelanchier laevis - Allegheny Shadberry, Amelanchier lamarckii - Apple Serviceberry, Amelanchier obovalis - Southern Juneberry, Amelanchier ovalis - Snowy Mespilus, Amelanchier ovalis integrifolia, Amelanchier pallida - Pale Serviceberry, Amelanchier parviflora, Amelanchier sanguinea - Roundleaf Serviceberry, Amelanchier spicata, Amelanchier stolonifera - Quebec Berry, Amelanchier utahensis - Utah Serviceberry, Amelanchier weigandii, Amelanchier x grandiflora

Of these, four grow in my region: Amelanchier arborea (Common Serviceberry), Amelanchier canadensis (Canadian Serviceberry), Amelanchier laevis (Allegheny Serviceberry), Amelanchier sanguinea (Roundleaf Serviceberry)

Although there are a couple pf varieties of Serviceberry that grow outside of North America, this is predominately New World medicine. Serviceberry was much used by Native Americans.

According to Plants for a Future:

Saskatoon was quite widely employed as a medicinal herb by the North American Indians, who used it to treat a wide range of minor complaints. It is little used in modern herbalism. An infusion of the inner bark is used as a treatment for snow-blindness. A decoction of the fruit juice is mildly laxative. It has been used in the treatment of upset stomachs, to restore the appetite in children, it is also applied externally as ear and eye drops. A decoction of the roots has been used in the treatment of colds. It has also been used as a treatment for too frequent menstruation. A decoction of the stems, combined with the stems of snowberry (Symphoricarpos spp) is diaphoretic. It has been used to induce sweating in the treatment of fevers, flu etc and also in the treatment of chest pains and lung infections. A decoction of the plant, together with bitter cherry (Prunus emarginata) has been used as a contraceptive. Other recipes involving this plant have also been used as contraceptives including a decoction of the ashes of the plant combined with the ashes of pine branches or buds. A strong decoction of the bark was taken immediately after childbirth to hasten the dropping of the placenta. It was said to help clean out and help heal the woman's insides and also to stop her menstrual periods after the birth, thus acting as a form of birth control. A tea made from the root bark (mixed with other unspecified herbs) was used as a tonic in the treatment of excessive menstrual bleeding and also to treat diarrhoea. A bath of the bark tea was used on children with worms. An infusion of the root was used to prevent miscarriage after an injury. A compound concoction of the inner bark was used as a disinfectant wash. A compound infusion of the plant (Downy Serviceberry)has been used as an anthelmintic, in the treatment of diarrhoea and as a spring tonic. An infusion of the bark has been used in the treatment of gonorrhoea.

Peterson Field Guides Eastern and Central Medicinal Plants tells us:

Chippewas used root bark tea with other herbs as a tonic for excessive menstrual bleeding, a female tonic and to treat diarrhea. Cherokees used in herb combinations as a digestive tonic. Bath of bark tea used on children with worms.

George Washington is said to have planted Serviceberry at Mount Vernon, but we can only assume his reason for doing so was the fruit. Overall, Serviceberry is a much-underutilized native fruit. Recent research has shown that it may have anti-viral properties that could be useful in combating such viruses as COVID-19.



This article is an excerpt from The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guide: by Judson Carroll

His New book is:



Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else

Read About Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else: http://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9R



His other works include:

The Encyclopedia of Bitter Medicinal Herbs:

southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5



Christian Medicine, History and Practice:

https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTB



Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People

southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.html

Also available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25



Look Up: The Medicinal Trees of the American South, An Herbalist's Guide

http:///www.amazon.com/dp/1005082936



The Herbs and Weeds of Fr. Johannes Künzle:

https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/05/announcing-new-book-herbs-and-weeds-of.html



Author: Judson Carroll. Judson Carroll is an Herbalist from the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina.

His weekly articles may be read at judsoncarroll.com

His weekly podcast may be heard at: www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbs

He offers free, weekly herb classes: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325



Disclaimer

The information on this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or condition. Nothing on this site has been evaluated or approved by the FDA. I am not a doctor. The US government does not recognize the practice of herbal medicine and their is no governing body regulating herbalists. Therefore, I'm just a guy who studies herbs. I am not offering any advice. I won't even claim that anything I write is accurate or true! I can tell you what herbs have "traditionally been used for." I can tell you my own experience and if I believe an herb helped me. I cannot, nor would I tell you to do the same. If you use any herb I, or anyone else, mentions you are treating yourself. You take full responsibility for your health. Humans are individuals and no two are identical. What works for me may not work for you. You may have an allergy, sensitivity or underlying condition that no one else shares and you don't even know about. Be careful with your health. By continuing to read my blog you agree to be responsible for yourself, do your own research, make your own choices and not to blame me for anything, ever.

2 weeks ago
https://www.spreaker.com/user/13414994/anise

In this episode, I discuss the Weston A. Price Foundation, Sally Fallon and her excellent cookbook, Nourishing Traditions, and the surprising truths about the food we eat.  Then, I talk about Anise, an herb that was once so valued it could be used to pay taxes.





Read about my new book, Growing Your Survival Herb Garden for Preppers, Homesteaders and Everyone Else:  https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/04/growing-your-survival-herb-garden-for.html

Available for purchase on Amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X4LYV9R

Visit my Substack and sign up for my free newsletter: https://judsoncarroll.substack.com/

Read about my new other book, The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Bitter Herbs: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-encyclopedia-of-bitter-medicina.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09V3WCJM5

and

Christian Medicine, History and Practice: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2022/01/christian-herbal-medicine-history-and.html

Available for purchase on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09P7RNCTB


Herbal Medicine for Preppers, Homesteaders and Permaculture People: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/2021/10/herbal-medicine-for-preppers.html

Also available on Amazon: www.amazon.com/dp/B09HMWXL25

Podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/show/southern-appalachian-herbs

Substack: https://judsoncarroll.substack.com/

Blog: https://southernappalachianherbs.blogspot.com/

Free Video Lessons: https://rumble.com/c/c-618325
2 weeks ago