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Glenn Greenwood

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since Sep 13, 2021
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Recent posts by Glenn Greenwood

I know this is an old post but I liked your honesty.  Mathew had a lot of good advice. Meeting people on and off the internet is tricky for both males and females.  I stopped and gave an up vote right at the part you stated they better have their *****together. Best of luck to you.  
3 weeks ago
Emma, you made me laugh. Haha. I am the hermit you describe living off grid for years now on seven acres woods and fields.  It is great and I could not go back to living and working and Boston.  I had all the skills ( house building, welding, running equipment, logging etc.) and grew up on a tree farm which really helped me out. Go for it and see how you like it and at your age especially go for it with others. For the most part I like my hermit life and call my lifestyle my cocoon. I build and sell handy man (and women) type things so meet with people now and then. I also go into town to get supplies and groceries every two or three weeks and bump into people. With the internet, I can keep in contact with a bunch of people.  With all the chores and work plus a schedule I keep and periodic socialization, I have not gone totally feral yet...although my beard seems to be growing bushier and faster!  I think that is very smart for you to realize about the loneliness factor because it is a major factor most people do not consider.  No need to be a hermit. Get some friends and go for it and stay out of debt. Staying out of debt is a biggy for me. Good luck.
4 weeks ago
I had a Santi best electric toilet commercial unit in a rental unit that pumped all the gray water and sewer  for bathroom and kitchen sink in a rental unit that was located in the basement.  They sell gray water tanks etc also.  You might want to look at what they offer That would give you a lot of options. I bought two units for about $4000 so if one failed I could switch it out. They can pump water through a garden hose really far. When I sold that building, I sold the two units to a couple that wanted to pump grey water from their house to a greenhouse project they had a ways from their house. Good luck and get the biggest ruggedest unit you can afford (better yet do what I did and get two).
4 weeks ago
Old post but your line...as an introvert I like doing things in my house or yard ...made me smile. My married sister with five kids and always a bunch of yard projects and I call this introvert behavior , similar to your phrase, our cocoons.  I have to bust out of my cocoon and go into town and buy groceries and supplies tomorrow and then be good for a few weeks.  As I have grown older, I like my cocoon. Lots of things to do in my house and seven acre woods and field...like cut and stock up a bunch of firewood.  I do not see how people can live in skyscrapers with no yards.  I do not sit in the house all day long on TV and Internet but do enjoy periods of that to balance working outside doing things like welding, building things, running my chainsaws etc..   I say..enjoy your cocoon. I just asked my sister how things were in her cocoon...she has planted 33 trees.
4 weeks ago
The  method is to take off all valves and fill with soapy water drain and refill a couple of times. Use a portable sawzall with fine blade after drilling a hole to put blade in (this is while tank is full of soap water mixture).  You can use an angle grinder with cut off wheel but is less safe due to sparks.   Propane is orderless and a chemical is added to give it a smell. The odor can stay in tank even when no propane. Propane settles to bottom of tank. Propane also will form various residue that will fire up.  Propane will permeate into steel in of tank.   The tools you use for cutting should be air tools or portable so you do not electrocute yourself instead of blowing yourself up. Best thing is not to cut propane tanks...weird things happen sometimes...just saying.
1 month ago
Yes yes yes..very possible.  I have scrapped lots of things and have welders and cutting torches.  If I think there is the possibility of a fuel explosion I do not bother with it.  I have a dozen or more tanks headed to the scrapyard now (out of code) and I just take the fill valve off and junk them or exchange them at Walmart and pay a fee to get an in code tank that is full. I then take the Walmart tank to a local place that charges propane by the gallon and actually fills the tank.  Buying propane by the tankful vs by the gallon is an unbelievable rip off most people are not aware of.  I knew one guy that thought a gas tank off a car was empty and he threw a burning rag in it to make sure...it looked like a bomb went off with a big mushroom.of fire and smoke. The fire dept rushed over cause people saw the fire. No one was hurt luckily.  I am not going to weld or torch fuel tanks.
1 month ago
Agree with you.  In fall and late spring I take the firebrick out of my stove and save a bunch of firewood not heating up the bricks and get quicker heat.  Firebricks are meant to cause a hotter fire to have less emissions and not necessarily for getting a room heated quickly which is all that is needed during chilly times as opposed to days on end at near or below zero like it can get here in Maine. It has not hurt my stove with no firebricks and ashes protect the bottom of the stove. A woodboiler used like a battery charger with a large water storage tank as the battery is the best set up I have had. The fire can burn at a good efficient high rate with little or no smoke and your house gets steady heat like a normal boiler. The fire is almost separate from the heat load...no more getting roasted out and opening windows and doors or smoldering a fire in an "all nighter air tight stove".
1 month ago
I believe in KISS.  Keep it simple stupid I tell myself.  Wood stoves do not make efficient heaters because of the fire cycle.  I had an outside woodboiler that worked efficiently because I used the woodstove fire like a battery charger and had a big water tank as the battery. Then I got good even heat in the house controlled by a normal thermostat and got all the btus out of firewood by burning at full bore and little to no smoke. The draft, water temp, circulator pump etc was all controlled ...all I had to do was throw in big chunks of wood. I run a woodstove now because of a change in living circumstances....the woodboiler was way better. I have to open windows from overheating or I am smoldering the fire. Luckily I have triple wall metalbestos straight ss chimney pipe going straight from top of stove to over 2' above roof and it has a cap on it so I get no downdrafts, great draft no matter the weather (like when it is raining and in most stoves next to impossible to have a fire) and I do not have to deal with creasote.  I like things that are as reliable and simple as possible even if not as efficient as a complicated unit. Your woodstove set up as original should be able to roast your house I would think...maybe add mass to store heat? Hook up a hot water exchanger and a water storage tank and make it into a wood stove boiler combo?
1 month ago
What others have said and if you have baffle closed by door you will be getting a houseful of smoke when you open the door.  My wood boiler had a firebricked box and the door had a metal reflector plate.  On top of the firebricked box it had a tank with vertical tubes that the smoke and heat passed through to heat the water in the tank.  What a pain in the butt it was to have to take the top cover off and clean those tubes that would want to creasote up when the smoke hit the water cooled tubes.  I built a 16" long drill bit to fit my electric drill.  I saw a wood boiler at a business that had a better design that had the tubes horizontal making it much easier to clean. The key to woodboilers is to have the biggest water tank possible. Use the woodboilers like a battery charger and the tank as the battery. The woodboilers can burn for the most part at a very high and efficient rate and with little to no smoke. It's operation should be almost separate from your heat load. A normal thermostat hooked through circuitry to circulator pump/s to piping and the storage tank gives good steady heat that is not what you get with wood stoves (including "all nighter air tight stoves).
1 month ago
Here is an opposite way of thinking.  I read where a guy took out all the firebrick and put metal shields up to protect his stove. He then saved a whole lot of wood and got heat a lot quicker for fires needed to take the chills out of his house in the climate he lived in. EPA wood stoves with firebrick are designed to burn wood efficiently and hot to reduce pollutants and not necessarily to throw out the most heat. I do the same thing the guy recommended and it works perfectly. When it gets to constant heating with the fire burning all the time I just slip the firebricks in. It saves a lot of firewood in the fall and late spring because it takes way less fuel to get the stove throwing out heat without having to heat firebricks that are actually insulating the fire.  He had a lot of naysayers but it works for me.
1 month ago