carltonh Hatfield

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since May 02, 2010
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Scavenger Hunt
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Recent posts by carltonh Hatfield

I'd like more details.  If for no other reason, I named one of my daughters Acacia.
If you had a dense hawkweed area, could you put some chickens on it, do what you normally wouldn't and leave them fenced there till the hawkweed is gone?

I bet a salcata tortoise would eat them, we have one as a pet that eats pretty similar weeds, and one lives for 100 years, they might eat a lot.
6 years ago
I have no idea about the process, but I'm pretty sure declawing is more than clipping, because they don't grow back.  I'm not defending the process and would never have it done, I'm just saying the cat was that way when we it adopted us.
6 years ago
So we toss some chicken feed to the chickens in the morning.  Chickens eat it, but also the wild birds come.  The cat finds her hiding spot.  It scares away many birds and so less hen scratch is wasted.  The chickens are unafraid of the cat, the cat is afraid of them.  When the chickens are full, the wild birds come, and the cat catches one occasionally., usually doves  This is more impressive than normal because when we got the cat it already had the front claws de-clawed.  The cat eats a little of the dove and then the chickens come and steal the dove from the cat and eat it.

Once the cat ran away from the chickens, got in the house with a dove in its mouth. Them my wife yelled at the cat, the cat dropped the dove, the dove started flying around in the house, eventually shewed out with a toy light saber.  Should have got that on camera.  Today, instead the cat more or less gave the dove straight to the hens as soon as she killed it.
6 years ago
The last one looks like a purslane relative.

I want to know what the first one is too, because I feed it to my tortoise all the time.
6 years ago
I found what I think is "broad-leaved dock" or a close relative in the alley behind my house.  I dug up some and transferred it to my backyard and the chickens loved it.  Probably too much for it to survive unless I spread a bunch of seeds.
6 years ago
First, I think this could go in 2-3 subforums, so hopefully it is ok to put this here.

I'm trying to devise the most realistic game plan for how I could transition to a rural agriculture permaculture lifestyle from a suburban lower middle class life. Household income in ~10,000 per person, so options are limited.  Kids are currently ages 3-9, so in a few years I'll have lots of helping hands, but definitely not yet.

I'd like thoughts to improve this, as well as specifics.  I'll be looking at land in Texas east of the Dallas Fort Worth metroplex.  A little ways west of the area is cactus land, and east of us is agriculture land and 100 miles east is pine forest.

Here is a super rough strategy for my case.

First, find and buy cheap land when I can afford it, that is cheap because standard agriculture would not be easy without terraforming.  Around North Texas, that usually means land in flood plains, but also hilly areas.  Such land is often zoned, taxed, or used as timber land, recreational land, or hunting land. I don't know the precise differences, but no average person can afford taxes on land without some type of agricultural exemption.  I'm not sure if timber land is a subset or separate.

Next:  What minimalist permaculture terraforming would be appropriate for a flood plain to become a food forest?  Maybe intentionally deepening some of the land to make ponds and add aquaculture?

Third, seed the land with permaculture appropriate self sustaining crops, especially food trees.  One of the common area food trees as common as weeds are pecan trees, but I have no idea how they would do in a flood plain.  Supposedly they put taproots down as deep as they are tall. For 10 years I've been chopping one down at the ground because it is too near our pool and it keeps coming back.  Beehives could also be established early.

Those stages above are where I'd like the most advice.  What all would you plant on such land and environment, that you can let it grow on land you can hardly visit for several years while I continue the cubicle rat race?  Start the land on the process of preparing itself unattended.

Maybe after a few years, build a low cost barn that could double as rough housing and prepare the land for livestock.  Occasional longer stays by the wife and kids as I run the cubicle rat race to pay for it.

Eventually I should have enough savings to make a move and abandon the cubicle, build a house, and be mostly self sufficient and productive enough to make an income.

Other risks: The DFW metroplex will require more lakes to be created for urban water needs.  They "eminent domain" land and if the land is already low and in a flood plain, there is more risk that land I buy would be taken.
6 years ago
dfw-tx,

Do you have information on the times & places mentioned where there were some more free meetings for those who couldn't sign up for the permaculture design course?
7 years ago
Wow, Carrollton is only 3 miles away from me. I'll definitely have to check out that website.

I won't say where I am because my chickens aren't technically allowed. (A don't ask don't tell law.) But it is a place that has no farmers left, despite the city name.
7 years ago
That worked. I no longer have to remotely access my home PC from work to see the forum.

No clue on the spam, 10s of 1000s of PCs with the same IP can be hard to control. Hopefully any virus bots are gone if that was the cause.