Abe Coley

pollinator
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since Nov 13, 2010
Missoula, MT
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Recent posts by Abe Coley

Saw this today on Craigslist. 7000 yards of free wood chips would go a long way toward getting some epic plantings installed at Wheaton Labs. https://missoula.craigslist.org/zip/d/saint-regis-wood-mill-mulch/7308246156.html
12 hours ago
A chipper/grinder would be good to have, as well as some sort of blower and pipe system throughout the piles to aerate them instead of having to turn them.

Here's an article about my city buying the local compost facility and doing some upgrades: garden city compost
1 month ago
in this vid they make some flatbreads out of pine bark and chaga http://www.woodlanders.com/blog/2017/8/31/episode-13-inigenous-sami-tree-traditions
1 month ago
For the oaks and the hickories (and anything else with larger seeds), i like to stratify them in lightly moistened sphagnum moss, which really works well for deterring mold. Sphagnum is too coarse for smaller seeds though, so for them I use a lightly moistened paper towel in a ziploc.

Your fridge should be kept as close as possible to just a few degrees above freezing (34 is perfect). Put several thermometers in your fridge to find out where the coldest/warmest places are. Often the place right next to where the cold comes into the fridge from the freezer unit will be too cold and you will freeze any seeds that you put there. Additionally, sometimes the very bottom of the fridge will be a couple degrees warmer than the top of the fridge, as the compressor in the bottom gives off heat.

If seeds get moldy, you can give them a misting of hydrogen peroxide and put them in a new paper towel. I usually have to change out the paper towels ever 4 to 6 weeks, but some seeds get moldy a lot faster than others, some don't really get moldy at all. A little mold doesn't hurt them, and you can usually tell seeds that have gone bad because they go soft and squishy. A good pair of tweezers really helps for working with seeds in paper towels.

As for time required for different species, I usually go by the listing on sheffields.com. Often seeds will start germinating in the fridge, so you will need to check them every couple weeks at first and then at least once per week later in the spring, to pluck out the germinating seeds and place them into your growing medium.
1 month ago
I would take them to the self-service car wash, and bring a scrubber with a long handle so you can scrub out the bottom without having to stick your arm way down in there.
1 month ago
I have learned by experience that whole eggs in compost have a magical ability to stay unbroken until their smell reaches the maximum possible nastiness level.
1 month ago
Right next to my house is a narrow corridor under some power poles where there are two 4 foot chainlink fences really close to each other. The deer just hop the first fence, walk down the corridor to wherever they want to jump the second fence, and then they're in my neighbors' yard enjoying their bushes.

Deer will just step over something 12 inches tall and they will lazily hop over something 24 inches tall.

Jay Angler wrote:So I used our rock drill (think hammer drill on hormones) and drilled a hole in the bedrock



If possible I would go this route and put in a serious permanent fence and be done with it.
1 month ago
The quality of greenhouse is a huge variable. For the excavated area, the ratio of depth / surface area probably has a magic number that is just right for whatever latitude. I think a good starting point for figuring this out is looking up the maximum frost depth for your area.
2 months ago