Mary Saunders

+ Follow
since Nov 26, 2010
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
2
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
25
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
21
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Mary Saunders

It might have been quicker to dry summer, as less dense solids in them. Also, easier to work with. I say this because cutting a 30-pound winter can be kind of a samurai/sumo experience. I had some whopper volunteers one year. It was a job to cut them to use-size.
1 year ago
You should also be aware that aquifers are often very close to the surface here, which, as my acupucturist, Xavier Peralta, points out could be why wanting to do projects is a thing. The aquifers move underground. It makes having a cellar mostly unrealistic, though. I like the idea of cordwood. It might wick moisture and breathe a bit.termites could be interested, but you would see. I doubt it though. Things can dry out quickly when it is not raining, even in rainy season. The museum at Felipe Carillo Puerto has some traditional Maya examples, and my favorite building at Coba is elliptical. It is called the observatory and must be a great design for here, as it shows so little degradation over eons.
1 year ago
I love daikon. Even if you do not get edible roots, on account of hardpan, you will open corridors down for the water to flow, and bees and children love the flowers. I am also fond of water cress, which takes care of itself well. Rocket is the same or very close to arugula. Arugula may wilt in snow but comes back as soon as it warms, and I love it, especially the flowers. Violets can somewhat get away from you, but they are lovely to have around. Both flowers and greens are edible, and they are quite cold-hardy. Garlic cannot be held down in my Portland garden, even surviving quite cold periods, poking its strong green leaves up. There are many kinds of garlic. Some of them "walk" which is to say, the flowers will make very cute little bulblets, if left to do so. I really like perennial collards, if you can find them. They look like strong palm trees in the winter, and the leaves are good to make minimal-hassle wraps with, if you are into high-fiber, low-carb wraps. I also like mallows to have around, if they are a choice for your area. Common mallow stays close to the ground. There is a small, wild-type strawberry with good though small fruit and bright pink blooms. It is decorative and it will travel. It is called lipstick. I like it a lot. Pineapple sage is not very cold hardy, so if you want a mint choice that will not take you over and that has pretty red blossoms late in the season, I would go for some of this. I am happy to have regular mints around, despite their bad rep for taking over. They do till, and if and when you have to wrestle with them, at least you are pleasantly fragrant afterwards. I like orange mint a lot, but it is out-competed by spearmint, lemon balm, and peppermint. Some of the worts are kind of stickery and not so much fun, but some people like them. I have some motherwort that planted itself, and I let it stay. Some people like docks. I find them rude, but I put up with them. They do send deep roots that help you to keep water on site, I guess. I am in favor of keeping the ground covered. If you have mulch, say a passion vine that will die down, you can cover an area and put potatoes underneath. One Thanksgiving when potatoes ran out, I ran out, pulled up the mulch and harvested a few. I do like to grow potatoes that way or in sacks because I don't like having to dig for them or cutting straight through some pretty ones. The rainbow chards are nice. I like how neon the colors can be. I like that in winter.
2 years ago
The first one may be yellow or curly dock. Here is a link. The only way to tell may be to let it go to seed. Here is a very conservative link about it. Other links list more uses. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-651-yellow%20dock.aspx?activeingredientid=651&activeingredientname=yellow%20dock

I just chop and drop it. It is prolific though, and the roots do not especially like to come out easily of clay soil.
2 years ago
I would vote for violets in shadyland. I have mowed them, and you can use the leaves in salads if you want, high in C. Short bloom season, and I do not recall seeing bees on them even then. You can also get some dwarf yarrows. I don't know if you can mow arugula, but it is very hardy. Most kids probably would not like the taste. The flowers are divine for most adults though--a great mix of spicy, sweet, and nutty. Some cresses stay low. Purslane is absolutely no care, high in omega-3's and very useful especially in Mexican cooking and salands. Chives might not be bad. I also like chamomiles. Lipstick strawberry is really cute, small, and tasty and minimal care. I would not try to make a monoculture of this. Just try things you like to use, and see what does the best.
2 years ago
Yes, Derrick! This is it! I watched it late at night, all the way through, which I seldom do, and then neglected to note where I found it. Thank you so much for posting the link. I recommend this video highly. If it were music, it would kind of be Variations on a Theme, with homage to Fukuoka. It is so great when we get the nitty-gritty on changing things up in response to changes in observation and experience.
3 years ago
I found this among the listings in a search for dryland rice. I found it amusing, especially the part about having to consult two recent immigrants about how to de-hull his rice once he grew it.

http://www.sherckseeds.com/pages/2013/good-yields-for-rice-here-in-northern-indiana/

I also found it interesting that one source was from Russia, and the other from Belize.
3 years ago
Plants can pull both nitrogen and carbon out of the air and sequester these underground. The video I just watched from South Dakota made this point. Beyond that, there is a goose farmer in Portugal who sets a feast for geese and entices them out of the air. By doing this, he is keeping the gene pool of his own geese constantly refreshed, and birds will bring in phosphorus and calcium for you, although you will have trouble if you entice too many starlings and not enough hawks for a while. The farmer in Portugal does not force-feed his geese and still he won a foie-gras contest in France (which irritated the French). There is a TED talk on this by Chef Dan Barber. It is fascinating. You would think you would lose soil quality from exporting, but if you have the mix right, you do not, necessarily, from what I have gathered as a perm-obsessive over many years. While complaints about wildlife sometimes abound in permie circles ("I was a vegetarian until I moved to the country to grow vegetables." Larry Santoyo), there are examples of wildlife adding to the mix in constructive ways and with an entertainment in place value (e.g., fox babies jumping on trampolines). I have digressed. Fukuoka's rice varieties made it all over the planet I believe. It is likely you can buy rice here in the U.S. that has been dryland grown. You may even be able to grow rice from the organic bulk bin at a coop. I have done that with lentils, on accident, but it came out well.
3 years ago
My mom always put coffee grounds under her lime in the Florida Keys. She made a lot of pies with those limes. I read on another thread that some ants do not like coffee grounds. Pool-quality diatomaceous earth also discourages many insects and might please your lime. I have a lime I have kept for 30 years in Oregon, but I have to pull it in in the winter. It is a dwarf Bearss lime in a pot. They like a lot of fertilizer, and my citrus trees also get worms and pill bugs, who aerate, when the plants are outside in warm weather. I can say that worms like coffee grounds a lot. Anyway, worms up here do. Humans here drink coffee like some places drink sweet tea, and many coffee shops give out the spent grounds to customers as a courtesy, rather than having to pay to have them taken in trash. Citrus trees will also need phosphorus to bloom and bear fruit. The cheapest source of that is Vitamin Pee, for which there is a very entertaining thread here on permies. I highly recommend it when you have time. I found it to be hilarious, the famous Women Peeing Outside.
3 years ago
He grew vegetables with fruit trees, and you can see from the pictures in A Natural Way of Farming what it looked like--quite wild. It is my understanding that vegetative waste did not leave his farm and was always used to feed the soil. He had clover in rotation in his grain fields. He was successful enough in feeding the soil and in increasing its ability to sequester water that he did not flood his rice fields and did not add water beyond what it held from rain. Even doing this, he got remarkable rice yields and shared seeds that were helpful in China. I recently watched a presentation by a farmer in South Dakota who is able to get remarkable yields with dryland farming using similar methods to obtain more life forms in soil. I wish I remembered more details from that presentation. Perhaps someone here knows of it.
3 years ago