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Grapes are one of my favorite fruits!

They can be easy to grow and have such great flavor and texture!

I have a Triumph muscadine that is absolutely amazing to me when fully ripe for fresh eating. I bet it would make really good juice too. I'll have to try making some juice frome it this year!

I also hope to harvest my first crop from a bunch (pun intended ) of different table grapes this year!

What varieties do you enjoy the most and why?!

Favorite varieties based on the comments below...
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Catawba isn't much of a table grape but is a spectacular grape for wine and jelly. If I had to pick my favorite "all around" grape it would be Catawba.

My father started 2 vines when I was 7 years old. Those same two vines still produce year after year (a few years of no maintenance in there) and they are 43 years old.

I have rooted cuttings from those originals and propagated them at 3 different locations where I have lived over the years.

Catawba has a lot of history here in the United States.
 
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If I chose one grape it would have to be Interlaken...wait, no -- Swenson Red...  or an old fashioned seeded Concord?

 
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Choose? Why choose? Grow them all.

I honestly want at least two different table grapes, and probably at least one each red and white for wine, but hopefully two each. If these end up being fewer than six species because some do double-duty, I won't complain.

Also to be considered is your specific climate and the terroir of the soil you're planting in. You have little control over that, but it will impact the taste of whatever you plant there, and things like grapes and hops are especially affected.

The best thing you can do, in my opinion, to ensure great tasting grapes for whatever purpose is to feed your soil life. Boost it with compost extracts and fungal slurries. If your spot of land has the potential for an exceptional terroir, that's how you can best unlock it.

-CK
 
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Lon Anders wrote:Catawba isn't much of a table grape but is a spectacular grape for wine and jelly. If I had to pick my favorite "all around" grape it would be Catawba.



Very neat! Is it good for juice too?

My father started 2 vines when I was 7 years old. Those same two vines still produce year after year (a few years of no maintenance in there) and they are 43 years old.

I have rooted cuttings from those originals and propagated them at 3 different locations where I have lived over the years.



That is awesome, 43 years wow! I love that you've taken cuttings with you too, I plan to do that also if I ever move!
 
Steve Thorn
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Eric Thompson wrote:If I chose one grape it would have to be Interlaken...wait, no -- Swenson Red...  or an old fashioned seeded Concord?



It's hard to choose isn't it!

What do you like about those varieties and how do they taste?
 
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Steve Thorn wrote: Very neat! Is it good for juice too?


Yes it is a good juice grape and also decent champagne grape.

There was a time in U.S history when the Catawba grape was THE GRAPE from the Ohio River Valley to the east coast.

It's a "late" grape also so one can enjoy a late summer/early fall harvest.

 
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Lon Anders wrote:Yes it is a good juice grape and also decent champagne grape.



Good to know!

There was a time in U.S history when the Catawba grape was THE GRAPE from the Ohio River Valley to the east coast.



Very neat, I love hearing the history of old varieties!

It's a "late" grape also so one can enjoy a late summer/early fall harvest.



Always nice to have an extended harvest!
 
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Chris Kott wrote:Choose? Why choose? Grow them all.



I know right, wish I could!

I honestly want at least two different table grapes, and probably at least one each red and white for wine, but hopefully two each. If these end up being fewer than six species because some do double-duty.



I've done something similar to this, like you mentioned with different colors, and I have some that are supposed to have different flavors and different ripening times to have a large range of flavors and an extended harvest!
 
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