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Summary

Paul Wheaton and Alan Booker continue their review and discussion of the big black book, Bill Mollison's Permaculture - a designers' manual.

Figure 1.1 Evolution from contemporary agriculture to permaculture p 4, 5
(introductory discussion)

Ideas for all kinds of technology can be designed with permaculture. This diagram is applicable to more than just farms and gardens.  90 to 95% of people who come to permaculture from horticulture, 5% from things like natural building and alternative technology. Maybe 5% from people interested in design. Less linear, more ecological design

Permaculture includes any form of human technology. The permaculture mindset engages with complex systems rather than quashing them - work with nature, rather than against. Energy and resource waste is not viable. Sustainable and regenerative systems of human habitation. All ultimately will have to work with nature to be sustainable, let alone regenerative.

What about cell phones? Can they be re-imagined to be more in line with permaculture? Or can we just ignore that aspect? Hard to draw boundaries about what is in and out of permaculture.
Heating homes is now part of permaculture. Can now be even warmer while reducing global footprint, but 20 years ago there wasn't a good answer. Maybe in 20 years we'll have a more permaculture answer to cell phones.  Can't let the perfect be the enemy of the good, so get good stuff done and don't worry about 1% not being perfect. "No true Irishman" or "no true permaculturist" rhetorical, aggressive fallacy. Let's improve technical solutions, not use thought-stopping rhetorical attacks.

Relevant Threads

"Permaculture - a designers' manual" forum

The Big Black Book - summary, reviews,and where to buy

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This podcast was made possible thanks to:

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COMMENTS:
 
master pollinator
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Hi Paul and Alan. I enjoyed listening these two podcasts. It was really nice, you two not having the same opinion, but quietly discussing your different opinions. Why can't everyone talk this way, while 'agreeing to disagree'?
If I lived on your side of planet Earth, I would love the be in a PDC course taught by Alan and hosted by Paul. I hope someday I will find such a practical course here in the Netherlands. I do have the PDC, but it was an online course. I don't have all the hands-on-experience I'd like to have.
 
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I think Alan makes a great point in this podcast about not letting "perfect" get in the way of getting stuff done and making the best of what we can with what we have and know at the time.
 
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not letting "perfect" get in the way of getting stuff done and making the best of what we can with what we have and know at the time



The world of science has a well-known quotation for this situation.

In the late 1930s, a few years before World War 2 began, Britain began building an air-defense warning system using the recently discovered concept of radar. The leader of the project, a physicist named R.A. Watson-Watt, pushed ahead with the construction of what became known as the "Chain Home" system -- a network of radar stations based upon primitive, balky low-resolution technology. When asked why he was deploying "third best" technology when more advanced systems were already being designed, Watson-Watt replied:

"The best never comes, and second-best comes too late."
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