• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Dan Boone
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
  • Mike Barkley
 
master steward
Posts: 9045
Location: Pacific Northwest
3363
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One thing I recently realized is that one could probably document building a smaller hugel and submit the pictures to the Oddball Badge. Maybe they submit a lazagna bed to that, too. Maybe planting some fruit trees with their guilds, too. Maybe they won't have the Gardening Badge, but they'll have the Oddball Badge.

I got my Oddball Badge by making a play gravel pit, a roundwood kiwi trellis, and small hugel garden bed. I may never have the gardening badge, but I do have a shiny badge.

I honestly think that if people posted pictures of their projects--pictures that they might already have on permies--there might be a LOT more people with badges...
 
Posts: 37
Location: Adelaide, Australia
3
tiny house cooking rocket stoves
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Does this count? https://permies.com/t/113245/Vegie-patch
 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
Posts: 9045
Location: Pacific Northwest
3363
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Honestly, Paul's the only one who decides what counts for that badge and what doesn't. I had no idea if my stuff would count or not. I say post your videos and a link to your thread in the OddBall badge thread https://permies.com/wiki/97787/PEP-Badge-Oddball and see what happens! It can't hurt, right?
 
pollinator
Posts: 1422
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
411
forest garden rabbit tiny house books solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm ready to create another hugelkultur "pit" and thought it would be a great project for my first badge efforts. My pit is already 5'-6' deep and plenty long enough. So I'd only need to build it up another foot or two above ground level to meet the required 7' depth. These hugelpits work great here, but not the hugelkultur mounds due to our aggressive tradewinds and tropical sun.

My question: Sepp Holzer grain. I have no access to such seed here in Hawaii. But oats grow here just fine and tends to be perennial. I've tried regular rye but it succumbs to fungus problems. Would oats be a suitable substitute for Holzer grain?
 
Posts: 58
Location: Southeast Missouri
13
hugelkultur forest garden cooking building woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

paul wheaton wrote:Point noted.  

I wish to stick with the 7 foot tall stuff for reasons.  

To make it a bit simpler, I wrote this thread describing making a hugelkultur that is physically just 3 or 4 feet high, but using material right next to the hugelkultur so that  by the time you are done, there is a path next to the hugelkultur that is 3 or 4 feet deep - thus making it appear to be a total of 7 feet.





Now that makes so much sense that it sent my head spinning.  We are building a homestead in a forest that was last cut for timber over 60 years ago.  There is a beautiful layer about 12-18" thick of beautiful topsoil full of organic material, fungus, and worms that I have been digging down to the clay to stack my logs on.  As I dig holes for foundation footings for our house I'm saving the topsoil for the hugulkultur beds.  I hadn't event thought about digging down through the topsoil to the clay between beds.  That will give me more beautiful topsoil to add to my beds, and it will create natural swales.  Also less bending and stooping.

Mind blown.
 
Su Ba
pollinator
Posts: 1422
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
411
forest garden rabbit tiny house books solar woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ok now.....I have everything lined up to do this project except for the Sepp Holzer grain. I've got problems with it.
1- Hawaii has strict agricultural import rules. So not just any old business can get seeds into this state.
2- I have not yet found this seed for sale here or from an approved seed vendor.
3- Rye does very poorly in my location. It gets attacked by some sort of fungus and dies before its seed can mature. Thus it won't be a perennial on my farm. I've tried growing a couple varieties of rye grain, but haven't successfully harvested but a few seeds, which didn't sprout when I planted them later. I suspect the seed I saved was already infected by the fungus, thus killing it so it wasn't viable.

On the other hand......oats will grow here, and it tends to behave like a perennial. I've had my sheep graze it for two years now and it's still green and growing. If I harvest the grain and then mow the remaining plant short like a lawn, it grows back. Is that perennial enough to make it a decent substitute for Sepp Holzer grain?

I'd really like to try working on badges for two reasons -- it looks like a fun challenge. And #2, I'd like to get a feel for this endeavor since I plan to incorporate the badge idea in our local farm school events. But being in the tropics poses some problems. There are some things that need to be adjusted to my area. Such as the Sepp Holzer rye.
 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
Posts: 9045
Location: Pacific Northwest
3363
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
From what I understand of Sepp's rye, it's only perenial if it's kept mowed, just like your oats. If it goes to seed, it dies. I'm thinking (and I am not Paul and the call is totally his), that your oats would count.
 
pollinator
Posts: 157
305
fungi books cooking building medical herbs woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Su Ba wrote:I'd like to get a feel for this endeavor since I plan to incorporate the badge idea in our local farm school events.



I'd love to attend or help out with your PEP event whenever you start. Or should I say PES event?

I lived in Holualoa For 7 months helping a family friend who owns some land over there. Loved it. Also have a few family members on that Island too. Most of them live on Oahu including my mom. I'd love to check out what you're doing and throw a shoulder in to help whenever I fly over.
It would also give me more of an incentive to visit BI again.
 
He was giving me directions and I was powerless to resist. I cannot resist this tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!